All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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3:59pm

Sun February 12, 2012
Author Interviews

When The Bankers Plotted To Overthrow FDR

Originally published on Mon February 13, 2012 8:08 am

The Plots Against the President

It was a dangerous time in America: The economy was staggering, unemployment was rampant and a banking crisis threatened the entire monetary system.

The newly elected president pursued an ambitious legislative program aimed at easing some of the troubles. But he faced vitriolic opposition from both sides of the political spectrum.

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3:51pm

Sun February 12, 2012
Science

Virtual Penguins A Prescription For Pain?

Originally published on Tue February 14, 2012 3:44 pm

Snow World was designed specifically with burn patients in mind-- its icy river and comical snowmen are the furthest thing imaginable from fire.
Ari Hollander Hunter Hoffman

For troops injured in Iraq and Afghanistan, the deepest physical pain often comes much later — weeks, or even months, after the incident. That was the case for Sam Brown, whose story appears in this month's GQ magazine.

Brown graduated from West Point in 2006. In the late summer of 2008, he was deployed to southern Afghanistan to lead a platoon. He did security for base construction and made sure the local villagers had enough food, water, and medicine.

It was hot, often mind-numbingly dull, and dusty.

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3:00pm

Sun February 12, 2012
NPR Story

American's Arrest In Cuba Could Have Impact

A U.S. contractor working to provide Internet service to Cuba's small Jewish community was charged with spying and sentenced to 15 years in a Cuban prison. Alan Gross was reportedly working for the U.S. Agency for International Development.

12:51pm

Sun February 12, 2012
Deceptive Cadence

From Hyperpianos To Harmonious Handel: New Classical Albums

Lisa Smirnova studied Handel's suites for five years before recording them.
ECM

What's the saying — the more things change, the more they stay the same? It seems that's how it goes in the ways we make music. MIT futurologist Tod Machover rethinks traditional instruments, coming up with new things like the hyperpiano; Pianist Michael Chertock gives it a go in an explosive excerpt below.

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9:15pm

Sat February 11, 2012
The Record

Whitney Houston: Her Life Played Out Like An Opera

Originally published on Thu November 8, 2012 4:32 pm

Whitney Houston performs in 1988.
David Corio Getty Images

3:00pm

Sat February 11, 2012
NPR Story

Week In News: A Week Of Deals For Obama

James Fallows of The Atlantic talks to weekends on All Things Considered host Guy Raz about President Barack Obama's compromise on providing reproductive services mandated by health care law after resistance from religious institutions and his latest cover story for The Atlantic on Obama's demeanor and a recent deal reached with five of the biggest banks in the country to pay back individuals whose homes were wrongly foreclosed on.

3:00pm

Sat February 11, 2012
NPR Story

Oklahoma Opts Out Of Foreclosure Deal

Originally published on Sat February 11, 2012 5:23 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

Well, every single state in the country will get a piece of that $26 billion to help troubled homeowners keep their homes, every single state except Oklahoma. The attorney general in Oklahoma decided to opt out of the multistate settlement to hold banks accountable for questionable lending and foreclosure practices.

Scott Pruitt is Oklahoma's attorney general, and he joins me now on the line. Attorney General, welcome.

SCOTT PRUITT: Well, thank you, Guy.

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3:00pm

Sat February 11, 2012
Around the Nation

Hard Times Familiar in Okfuskee County, Okla.

Okfuskee County in Oklahoma is the birthplace of Woody Guthrie, who would have turned 100 this year. Much of the economic problems Guthrie sang about were from what he saw in the county, which was once the largest all-black community in the country. Guthrie's music still resonates there, especially in the town of Boley, where hope is hard to come by. Logan Layden of State Impact Oklahoma reports.

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7:57pm

Fri February 10, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

With Contraceptive Coverage Plan 2.0, Obama Pleases Allies, But Not Everyone

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 8:44 pm

President Obama, flanked by Health and Human Services Secretary Kathleen Sebelius, announces the revamp of the contraception-care policy on Friday.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

President Obama's latest proposed change in how contraceptives are covered by employer health insurance may not have ended the controversy that has raged for the past three weeks. But what the administration is calling an "accommodation" for religious employers has apparently mollified key allies who had opposed his original plan.

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4:44pm

Fri February 10, 2012
Religion

Catholics Split On Obama's Birth Control Decision

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 10:21 pm

Archbishop Thomas Wenski, shown celebrating Mass at the Cathedral of St. Mary in Miami last month, says the new birth control policy is a "smoke screen."
Lynne Sladky AP

Reaction from the Catholic community to the Obama administration's decision to revise its birth control policy was swift and mixed.

Under the new rule, employers with a religious objection to offering contraceptive coverage as part of their health care plans wouldn't have to provide it directly. Instead, the requirement to provide that coverage free of charge would fall on the insurance companies.

Some Catholics believe the president's new rule resolves the religious liberty issues. But others, including key bishops, say it is smoke and mirrors.

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4:13pm

Fri February 10, 2012
Animals

Saved From Extinction, Darwin's Crocs Are Now King

Crocodile ranger Tom Nichols stands beside the crocodile traps used in Darwin Harbour. Nichols' left hand was mangled by an irate "salty" nine years ago.
John Burnett NPR

It's appropriate that Darwin, the tropical capital of Australia's Northern Territory, is named for the English naturalist.

The massive, powerful and deadly saltwater crocodile — the world's largest living reptile — is the evolutionary triumph of 50 million years of natural selection. And in Darwin, the crocodile is equally dreaded and beloved.

Crocodylus porosus was hunted to near extinction in the last century. But in 1974, the Australian government put the species, known affectionately as the "Australian salty," under federal protection.

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3:00pm

Fri February 10, 2012
NPR Story

A Year After Revolution, Tensions Rising In Bahrain

Tensions are growing in the tiny Persian Gulf kingdom of Bahrain. Protests by Shiites in outlying areas are growing ahead of next week's anniversary of the uprising. There are daily clashes between protesters and police and some fear that the violence will escalate as the anniversary approaches on Feb. 14, perhaps spreading to the streets of the capital, Manama.

3:00pm

Fri February 10, 2012
NPR Story

How Will Banks Divide $25 Billion Settlement?

Audie Cornish talks to Chris Arnold about how money from the robo-signing agreement will be spent. The settlement — worth about $25 billion — will bring a huge increase in loan modifications and provide small checks to people who lost their homes to foreclosure.

11:26am

Fri February 10, 2012
Planet Money

The Undertaker Who Helps Big Banks Write Death Plans

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 6:03 pm

Nobody lives forever.
iStockphoto.com

The nation's big banks are writing death plans — living wills that spell out how, in a future crisis, they could be safely dismantled. The idea is that the death plans will help avoid another government bailout of the banks.

"You're technically writing your own funeral, down to the color of the flowers" says Dolores Atallo.

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5:41pm

Thu February 9, 2012
Economy

Birthplace Of 'Robo-Signing' Eyes Deal Critically

Originally published on Thu February 9, 2012 6:57 pm

A for-sale sign hangs in front of a Homestead, Fla., home. In 2009, Florida lawyer Tom Ice deposed a bank employee who admitted to signing hundreds of mortgage documents in a day without reading them.
J. Pat Carter AP

From the beginning, Florida lawyer Tom Ice says he realized the mass signing of mortgages was more than just a paperwork problem.

"I suspected then, and I suspect now, that we were really just touching the tip of the iceberg," he says.

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5:04pm

Thu February 9, 2012
Music Interviews

Sharon Van Etten: Hypnotically Complicated

Originally published on Thu February 9, 2012 8:58 pm

Sharon Van Etten's third album, Tramp, comes out Feb. 7.
Dusdin Condren

Like most pop singers, Sharon Van Etten seems to love repetition — a technique used aggressively in ad jingles and Top 40 hits, but also in more hypnotic and emotionally complicated ways. Van Etten's new record, Tramp, is full of repeated riffs, drones and phonemes, and they're more intense and emotionally packed than ever. Songs like "Serpents" display her expansive voice and coiled songwriting, and are earning Van Etten a good deal of attention.

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5:00pm

Thu February 9, 2012
NPR Story

Comparing The Candidates Tax Plans

Originally published on Thu February 9, 2012 5:00 pm

GOP presidential candidates (from left) Rick Santorum, Newt Gingrich, Mitt Romney and Ron Paul place their hands over their hearts during the national anthem at the start of a debate in Florida last month.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Cutting taxes is part of the DNA of the modern Republican Party. All four of the remaining GOP candidates for president have proposed steep cuts in business and personal taxes, and it sometimes seems like Republicans are competing to show the most enthusiasm for tax cuts.

At a debate last month, former Sen. Rick Santorum said tax cuts were needed to get the economy thriving again — even if they benefit the wealthy.

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4:30pm

Thu February 9, 2012
Movie Reviews

'Chico And Rita' And All That Jazz

Havana Heat: The title characters meet cute and swing hard in Chico and Rita, an animated love story with an infectious Latin groove.
GKIDS

In the 11 years since the Oscars introduced an award for Best Animated Feature, the category has been dominated by children's movies, often with computer-animated pandas, penguins and ogres at their center. This year's a little different. Two of the animated films are subtitled, and one is definitely aimed at adults: the Spanish film Chico and Rita, an animated love story steeped in jazz.

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4:29pm

Thu February 9, 2012
Monkey See

George Clooney On Acting, Fame, And Putting Down Your Cellphone Camera

Originally published on Fri February 10, 2012 1:04 pm

George Clooney as Matt King, Shailene Woodley as Alexandra King, and Nick Krause as Sid in The Descendants.
Universal Pictures

George Clooney is nominated for two Oscars this year — for his lead role in The Descendants and for co-writing the adapted screenplay for The Ides Of March, which he also directed. He speaks to Robert Siegel on today's All Things Considered about film, but also about the life he lives as one of Hollywood's most famous men.

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4:01pm

Thu February 9, 2012
Winter Songs

Winter Songs: Paul Simon, The Bard Of Bad Weather

Originally published on Tue February 14, 2012 3:22 pm

Paul Simon.
Mark Seliger

4:46pm

Wed February 8, 2012
Music Reviews

On 'Karimba,' Peruvian Band Melds World Sounds

The band Novalima is undeniably Peruvian, but the music on their new album Karimba is infused with sounds from around the world including dub, salsa and club music.

3:00pm

Wed February 8, 2012
NPR Story

Letters: Is The Middle Finger Offensive?

Audie Cornish and Robert Siegel read emails from listeners about whether giving the middle finger is offensive.

3:00pm

Wed February 8, 2012
NPR Story

Sectarian Violence Rising in Syria

What happened in Karm al Zeitoun? Over the past week, reports have emerged of at least three Sunni families were brutally slaughtered by regime-backed Allawite thugs known as "shabiha." Stories of a brief but brutal campaign of ethnic cleansing in the mixed neighborhood of Homs, means some people's worst fears are coming true: The conflict is becoming sectarian. Allawites, too, report killings of their own by Sunnis. Each side says the other is pushing the people toward the brink of sectarian war.

3:00pm

Wed February 8, 2012
NPR Story

Hamas, Palestinians Sign Unity Agreement

Robert Siegel speaks with Daoud Kuttab, director general of a Palestinian media organization and the Community Media Network in Amman, Jordan, about the unity agreement between Hamas and the Palestinian Authority.

3:00pm

Wed February 8, 2012
Election 2012

Santorum Takes His Victory Lap In Texas

Former Pennsylvania senator Rick Santorum won Tuesday's caucuses in Minnesota and Colorado, as well as the non-binding primary in Missouri. On Wednesday, he took a victory lap in Texas.

3:00pm

Wed February 8, 2012
Election 2012

Ron Paul Supporters Look Ahead

Republican presidential candidate Ron Paul has yet to win a primary, but his supporters remain enthusiastic. Robert Siegel speaks with Ron Paul supporters Christa Leonard in St. Paul, Minn., and Ken Stanton in Fort Collins, Colo., following the caucuses in those states about what's keeping them committed.

6:26pm

Tue February 7, 2012
Election 2012

Obama Changes Tone On SuperPACS, Endorses Own

Originally published on Tue February 7, 2012 6:31 pm

As a candidate and as president, Barack Obama has disparaged the role of big money in politics. At his 2010 State of the Union address, he even called out the Supreme Court for a ruling that opened the door to unlimited personal and business contributions. But, faced with a Republican opposition that's raising millions from a handful of sources, President Obama let his fundraisers loose to play the game too.

6:00pm

Tue February 7, 2012
Health

Poll: Many Catholics Support Birth Control Coverage

A new federal policy would require most employers, including Catholic hospitals and universities, to include birth control in their employees' health insurance.
Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

Republican presidential hopeful Mitt Romney has joined the chorus criticizing President Obama over a controversial policy that would require most employers, including Catholic hospitals and universities, to include birth control in their employees' health insurance.

Catholic opinion leaders have denounced the policy as an assault on their religious freedom.

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5:46pm

Tue February 7, 2012
Opinion

Cabaret Wanes As The Oak Room Is Felled

Originally published on Tue February 7, 2012 7:13 pm

American comedy duo Jerry Lewis (left) and Dean Martin (right) with the English playwright and actor Noel Coward at an unknown location in 1953. Lewis and Martin were famous for their cabaret acts in the 1940s and 1950s.
R. Mitchell Getty Images

One of New York City's most famous cabaret clubs, the Oak Room at the Algonquin Hotel, is closing. At least one person will feel the loss — Murray Horwitz, the author of two Broadway musicals and numerous cabaret acts.

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4:40pm

Tue February 7, 2012
Music Interviews

Search For A Singer To Hit 'Low E' Spans Globe

Welsh composer Paul Mealor, who scored the music for Prince William and Kate Middleton's royal wedding, has a new composition in the works. For it, he's seeking a rich and low singing voice — one capable of reaching the "low E" note. And as he's learning, reaching the low E is no easy feat. To find a singer up to the task, Mealor has had to embark on an international search. Robert Siegel catches up with Mealor to hear how his search is going.

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