All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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3:00pm

Sat April 14, 2012
NPR Story

Three-Minute Fiction: Judge's Current Favorites

Transcript

(SOUNDBITE OF CLOCK TICKING)

GUY RAZ, HOST:

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3:00pm

Sat April 14, 2012
NPR Story

Storms Threaten Great Plains With Hail, Tornadoes

Originally published on Sat April 14, 2012 6:49 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

From NPR News, it's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Guy Raz.

Our cover story today: the GOP's gender gap. We'll get to that in a few moments, but first to the severe weather in much of the Great Plains. The National Weather Service is warning that today's outbreak of tornadoes could be a, quote, "high-end, life-threatening event." Several confirmed tornadoes have already touched down across Kansas and Oklahoma, and more are expected in Nebraska and Iowa.

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3:00pm

Sat April 14, 2012
NPR Story

The Week In News: A Rough Cycle For N. Korea, China

Originally published on Sat April 14, 2012 6:49 pm

Transcript

GUY RAZ, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Guy Raz.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: It's simple. If you make more than $1 million every year, you should pay at least the same percentage of your income in taxes as middle-class families do.

(SOUNDBITE OF MUSIC)

RAZ: President Obama from his weekly Saturday video address talking taxes and his proposal for a millionaire's tax, the so-called Buffett Rule. James Fallows of The Atlantic is with me now for more on this story and others we're following. Hello, Jim.

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5:23pm

Fri April 13, 2012
Three Books...

Permanent Siesta: 3 Books To Whisk You Away

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 5:55 pm

iStockphoto.com

One doesn't necessarily associate spring travel with heavy reading. For one, books are bulky luggage, the weighty enemies of economical packers; even an e-reader takes up precious space in one's overflowing duffel. And two, escapist migration to mountaintops or flowery fields or seaside locales for sun worship and meditative communion with nature connotes a markedly book-free environment, an escape from the office or the solemn halls of academe.

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4:32pm

Fri April 13, 2012
Jazz

Alfredo Rodriguez: 'Crossing The Border' To Meet A Legend

Originally published on Fri April 20, 2012 6:06 pm

Alfredo Rodriguez's new album is titled Sounds of Space.
Courtesy of the artist

In 2009, jazz pianist Alfredo Rodriguez showed up in Laredo, Texas, with only a suitcase, some sheet music and one aim: to collaborate with Quincy Jones. A Cuban seeking amnesty in the U.S., Rodriguez ended up arrested by Mexican border officials. He says they questioned him for hours and demanded money.

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4:04pm

Fri April 13, 2012
Television

'Airbender' Creators Reclaim Their World In 'Korra'

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 5:55 pm

Korra demonstrates fire- and water-bending in The Legend of Korra, a new series from the creators of Avatar: The Last Airbender. It premieres April 14 on Nickelodeon.
Nickelodeon

When M. Night Shyamalan's fantasy film The Last Airbender — panned by both critics and fans of the wildly popular TV series on which it was based — flopped majestically at the box office, it looked like the end of a valuable franchise.

But now, with The Legend of Korra, which premieres Saturday on Nickelodeon, the creators of Avatar: The Last Airbender have been given a rare chance to rebuild a world that was taken away from them.

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4:00pm

Fri April 13, 2012
The Record

Kraftwerk In New York: Decades Of Influence On Display

Ralf Hutter (left) and the other members of Kraftwerk in performance at the Museum of Modern Art in New York on Tuesday.
Peter Boettcher Courtesy of MoMA

Imagine an era when mainstream music wasn't filled with synthesizers. When electronic music wasn't a force propelling everything from pop and hip-hop to music from the underground. There was a time when this world existed. Then Kraftwerk emerged, and the world we knew changed.

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11:16pm

Thu April 12, 2012
Movie Reviews

An Inspiring Teacher, Exactly When He's Needed

Originally published on Tue January 29, 2013 5:55 pm

Mohamed Fellag, an Algerian comedian and humor writer, plays the title character in the Oscar-nominated Monsieur Lazhar, who steps in to teach a class of middle school students at exactly the right time.
Music Box Films

At the start of a bright, sunny day that seems otherwise like any other day, a popular teacher is found dead in her classroom. It was suicide.

The school is traumatized, especially that teacher's students. By the next day, the principal is at her wits' end trying to find someone willing to take the class. So when Bachir Lazhar (Mohamed Fellag) offers to teach, it comes at just the right moment.

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8:00pm

Thu April 12, 2012
Asia

North Korean Rocket Launch Reportedly Fails

Robert Siegel talks to Louisa Lim in Seoul about North Korea's rocket launch on Friday morning.

5:55pm

Thu April 12, 2012
Latin America

Some Latin Leaders Want New Approach To Drug War

Some Latin American leaders want to talk about the possibility of legalizing some drugs, a move the U.S. strongly opposes. Here, a Mexican soldier stands guard at a huge marijuana plantation that was uncovered in San Quintin, Baja California state, near the U.S. border, last year.
Antonio Nava AFP/Getty Images

When President Obama travels to Colombia this weekend for the Summit of the Americas, he'll be stepping into a vigorous debate about the drug war that could be awkward for the United States.

Some Latin American leaders, who also happen to be strong U.S. allies, say the American-sponsored war on drugs is failing and that new options need to be considered.

One proposal they want to discuss is legalizing some drugs — a move the U.S. strongly opposes.

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5:20pm

Wed April 11, 2012
Election 2012

Romney And Ryan: A Budding Political Bromance

Originally published on Wed April 11, 2012 8:51 pm

Mitt Romney jokes with Wisconsin Rep. Paul Ryan during a pancake brunch on April 1 in Milwaukee.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

One of the sharpest dividing lines emerging between President Obama and GOP presidential front-runner Mitt Romney is the budget introduced in Congress by Rep. Paul Ryan, R-Wis., with its sharp cuts in domestic spending and lower tax rates.

Both sides see it as a winning issue for the fall campaign. The Obama campaign likes to call it the "Romney-Ryan budget" — and Romney hasn't objected.

On the campaign trail in Wisconsin, Ryan was a constant presence with Romney before that state's April 3 Republican primary, which Romney won.

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7:26pm

Tue April 10, 2012
Around the Nation

Zimmerman's Attorneys Withdraw As Counsel

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

It's ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Audie Cornish.

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

And I'm Robert Siegel.

In Sanford, Florida, there's been a new development in the Trayvon Martin shooting case. Late today, attorneys for the admitted shooter, George Zimmerman, said they are no longer representing him. Attorney Craig Sonner says they haven't spoken to Zimmerman since Sunday.

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4:35pm

Tue April 10, 2012
Theater

Encore! Encore! Applauding The Literal Showstopper

Originally published on Wed April 11, 2012 2:26 pm

Actress Pearl Bailey during curtain call for the 1967 Broadway production of Hello, Dolly!
John Dominis Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images

Earlier this month, tenor Juan Diego Florez made headlines when he sang the aria "Una furtiva lagrima" in the Donizetti opera L'elisir D'Amore at the Metropolitan Opera — not once, but twice.

The audience responded so enthusiastically that after well over a minute of applause and shouts of "Encore!" he sang the whole thing again — all five minutes of it.

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4:15pm

Tue April 10, 2012
The Record

Everybody Wants To Be A K-Pop Singer

South Korean girl group Girls' Generation onstage during the Seoul Music Awards in January.
Chung Sung-Jun Getty Images

3:00pm

Tue April 10, 2012
NPR Story

Legal Definitions Of Hate Crimes Vary

Audie Cornish talks to Chris Benson, associate professor of journalism and African American studies at the University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign, about what constitutes a hate crime and what role it's playing in recent headlines.

3:00pm

Tue April 10, 2012
NPR Story

Critics: Suspending Marlins' Manager Not Enough

The manager of the Miami Marlins, Ozzie Guillen, apologized for comments praising Fidel Castro on Tuesday. Guillen has been suspended for five games because of the remarks. He now says he'll do whatever he can to repair relations with angry Cuban-Americans.

4:30pm

Mon April 9, 2012
The Record

How To Succeed In The Music Business (By Trying Really, Really Hard)

Originally published on Wed April 11, 2012 2:43 pm

Raka Dun (left) and Raka Rich of the Oakland, Calif., duo Los Rakas.
Laura Sydell via Instagram NPR

It's never been easy to make a living as a musician. But there was always a dream: to become a star on the strength of your talent and your music. The Internet is a rude sandman, however, and today that dream is a lot more convoluted.

No longer can a would-be rock star follow the once-accepted checklist: (1) sign with a big label, (2) get a hit, (3) buy mansions and cars. The number of ways a musician can make money is now varied. The question, for many musicians still trying to make a go of it in the industry, is whether those many sources can add up to something sustainable.

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12:44pm

Mon April 9, 2012
Music Interviews

Adam Cohen: On Intimacy, Antagonism And Influence

Originally published on Mon April 9, 2012 5:14 pm

Adam Cohen says he's proud to be the son of singer Leonard Cohen.
Courtesy of the artist

During the course of his career, singer-songwriter Adam Cohen says he has twisted himself into creating commercially successful music — but not this record, not this song. "What Other Guy," from his third album Like A Man, didn't seem likely to generate mainstream popularity. And yet it did, more than any other song he has ever recorded.

The son of iconic singer Leonard Cohen, Adam Cohen says his latest record is a celebration and demonstration of his father's influence on his music.

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12:28pm

Mon April 9, 2012
Music Reviews

The Toure-Raichel Collective: A Collaboration By Accident

Originally published on Mon April 9, 2012 5:14 pm

Vieux Farka Toure (left) and Idan Raichel, collaborating as The Toure-Raichel Collective, released The Tel-Aviv Session on March 26.
Nitzan Treystman

Idan Raichel is one of Israel's top-selling pop musicians. Vieux Farka Toure is a virtuoso guitarist from Mali. The two met by chance in a German airport, and when Toure played a concert in Tel Aviv, Raichel sat in. He enjoyed himself so much that he invited Toure and two other musicians to come to a studio the next day and jam. The music they created is now an album called The Tel Aviv Session.

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4:57pm

Sun April 8, 2012
Monkey See

Lena Dunham's 'Girls': Still Sex, Still The City, Different Show

Originally published on Mon April 9, 2012 8:15 am

Lena Dunham stars in HBO's new series, Girls, premiering April 15.
Jojo Whilden HBO

Lena Dunham's new series Girls debuts on HBO on April 15. Dunham, who got quite a bit of attention for being the star, director and writer of the 2010 indie film Tiny Furniture, fills the same three roles in this ensemble show about four young women in New York.

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3:37pm

Sun April 8, 2012
Author Interviews

Ignore 'The Mama's Boy Myth': Keep Your Boys Close

Originally published on Sun April 8, 2012 7:16 pm

Author Kate Stone Lombardi is the recipient of six Clarion awards. She has written for The New York Times and The Wall Street Journal.
Nancy Borowick

There are plenty of pop culture references to the dangers of a close mother-son relationship. From the myth of Oedipus to the movie Psycho, narrative after narrative harps on the idea that mothers can damage their sons, make them weak, awkward and dependent.

But for millions of men, the opposite has turned out to be true, author Kate Lombardi tells NPR's Laura Sullivan. Lombardi — a mother herself — is the author of the new book, The Mama's Boy Myth: Why Keeping Our Sons Close Makes Them Stronger.

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3:00pm

Sun April 8, 2012
Books

Three-Minute Fiction

More than 6,000 original stories were submitted to this round of Three-Minute Fiction. To see these stories and others, visit npr.org/threeminutefiction.

4:00pm

Sat April 7, 2012
Music Interviews

Rosie Thomas: Restarting A Musical Life 'With Love'

Originally published on Sun April 8, 2012 5:32 pm

Rosie Thomas' latest album is titled With Love.
Courtesy of the artist

With Love is singer Rosie Thomas' first full-length album in four years, and she's experienced many ups and downs in that time. One of the downs was an injury: Her thyroid broke, causing her to take a hiatus from music.

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3:00pm

Sat April 7, 2012
Around the Nation

A New Turn In Calif. 'Shaken Baby' Case

Weekends on All Things Considered guest host Laura Sullivan speaks with NPR reporter Joseph Shapiro about the sentence of Shirley Ree Smith's "shaken baby" case. California Gov. Jerry Brown has commuted Smith's sentence. Despite her claims of innocence, Smith was convicted in December 1997, and has been free since 2006 awaiting the results of her appeals.

3:00pm

Sat April 7, 2012
Analysis

Week In News: Obama, Romney Eye General Election

Originally published on Sat April 7, 2012 6:25 pm

Transcript

LAURA SULLIVAN, HOST:

It's WEEKENDS on ALL THINGS CONSIDERED from NPR News. I'm Laura Sullivan.

PRESIDENT BARACK OBAMA: Businesses created another 121,000 jobs last month in the unemployment rate ticked down. Our economy has now created more than four million private sector jobs over the past two years.

MITT ROMNEY: A record number of Americans are now living in poverty. And the most vulnerable are the ones that have been hurt the most. Thirty percent of single moms are now living in poverty.

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3:00pm

Sat April 7, 2012
World

For India, An Unclear Visit From Pakistan's President

Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari is scheduled to make a one-day visit to India on Sunday, April 8. It's the first visit by a Pakistani president since 2005. However Zardari's trip is being described as a personal visit in an attempt to keep expectations low and to allow both sides room to avoid confronting difficult issues, such as Indian demands that Pakistan do more to fight terrorism. Elliot Hannon reports from New Delhi.

4:42pm

Fri April 6, 2012
Movie Reviews

To Be Or Not To Be (The Pope) Is The Question

Originally published on Fri April 6, 2012 7:01 pm

IFC Films

When the College of Cardinals gathers in the Vatican to choose a new church leader — formally the Bishop of Rome — it announces its selection with the Latin phrase "Habemus papam" ("We have a pope").

But suppose that, when a cardinal steps out onto a balcony in St. Peter's Square to utter those fateful words, the gentle soul in white sitting behind him, out of sight of the crowd, develops stage fright.

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4:23pm

Fri April 6, 2012
Music Interviews

Gotye: 'Less Of A Musician, More Of A Tinkerer'

Originally published on Wed April 11, 2012 10:47 am

Australian pop singer Wouter "Wally" De Backer is better known as Gotye.
Courtesy of the artist

The Australian artist Gotye has been big in his home country for several years, but this winter, one particular song started an avalanche. "Somebody That I Used to Know," from the album Making Mirrors, has been a massive hit everywhere it's landed: the U.K., Germany, South Africa, Israel and now here in the U.S. It even inspired a YouTube cover that's become a runaway hit all its own.

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3:00pm

Fri April 6, 2012
Remembrances

Doctor Blazed Trails For Women In Medicine

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

Dr. Leila Denmark led an exceptional life. She fought hard to become a doctor when women were largely shut out of the profession and helped research and test the whooping cough vaccine. She then opened her own practice and spent the next 71 years caring for child patients and their parents. Dr. Denmark died this week at the age of 114. That's right, 114.

Charles Edwards of member station WABE in Atlanta has this remembrance.

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2:03pm

Fri April 6, 2012
Book Reviews

100 Years Later, The Titanic Lives On In Letters

Originally published on Fri April 6, 2012 6:23 pm

The ill-fated Titanic rests at Harland and Wolff's shipyard, Belfast, in February 1912.
Topical Press Agency Getty Images

When I hear the word "Titanic," I picture a tuxedoed Leonardo DiCaprio, waiting at the bottom of a gilded staircase while the voice of Celine Dion swells in my mind. It's all Edwardian glitz and glamour, decadence and passionate love, the kind best enjoyed in a dark theater with plenty of popcorn. And then I quickly remember that the ship sinks, and that Titanic is more than just an epic film from my youth. On April 15, a century will have passed since the ship plummeted into the icy Atlantic, and it is the tragedy we should remember, not just the mythology surrounding it.

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