All Things Considered

Weekdays 4-7pm and Weekends 5-6PM
Robert Siegel, Michele Norris, Melissa Block
Jonese Franklin

Since its debut in 1971, All Things Considered has delivered in-depth reporting and transformed the way listeners understand current events and view the world. Every weekday, hosts Melissa Block, Michele Norris, and Robert Siegel present two hours of breaking news mixed with compelling analysis, insightful commentaries, interviews, and special -- sometimes quirky -- features. Guy Raz hosts a one-hour edition of the program on Saturday and Sunday.

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6:33pm

Sun April 26, 2015
Africa

South Africa's Xenophobic Attacks 'Vile,' Says Zulu King Accused Of Inciting Them

Originally published on Mon April 27, 2015 12:36 am

Zulu King Goodwill Zwelithini, center, arrives at a Zulu gathering at a stadium in Durban, South Africa. Six people have died in anti-immigrant violence in the city in recent weeks, and another death has been reported in Johannesburg; Zwelithini is accused of inciting the attacks with incendiary comments, but says his remarks were taken out of context.
AP

Goodwill Zwelithini is the influential king of South Africa's Zulu nation. Comments that he made last month — when he reportedly said head lice should be squashed and foreigners should pack their belongings and leave the country — have been blamed for igniting attacks on foreigners, resulting in at least seven deaths. But Zwelithini denies inciting the violence.

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5:27pm

Sun April 26, 2015
Asia

A Day After Earthquake, Nepal Struck By Aftershocks

Originally published on Sun April 26, 2015 8:51 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

5:27pm

Sun April 26, 2015
Sports

How Will 'Off-The-Field' Issues Affect Jameis Winston's NFL Prospects?

Originally published on Sun April 26, 2015 6:34 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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5:27pm

Sun April 26, 2015
World

Malta's Coast Guard Rescues Migrants — And Feels The Strain

Originally published on Sun April 26, 2015 6:34 pm

Soldiers in Malta carry coffins during a funeral service for 24 migrants who drowned while trying to reach southern Italy.
Alessandra Tarantino AP

This week, the bodies of 24 unidentified migrants were laid to rest in Malta, the European island nation in the Mediterranean Sea. They were among more than 800 people who lost their lives last weekend off the coast of Libya when their ship capsized as they were trying to cross the Mediterranean to reach a better life.

Lieutenant Keith Caruana of the Armed Forces of Malta spoke with NPR's Arun Rath about the situation in the Mediterranean — and the toll it has taken on rescuers after more than a decade of trying to save the lives of desperate people seeking safety.

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6:23pm

Sat April 25, 2015
U.S.

The Armenian Diaspora Remembers And Mourns

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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5:27pm

Sat April 25, 2015
World

Solving Crimes With Pollen, One Grain Of Evidence At A Time

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 6:23 pm

Dallas Mildenhall, New Zealand's forensic pollen expert, peers at samples through a microscope.
Courtesy of David Wolman

Some murder cases are harder to solve than others. The investigation into the killing of Mellory Manning — a 27-year-old woman who was assaulted and murdered in 2008 while working as a prostitute in Christchurch, New Zealand — confounded police.

They conducted an investigation and interviewed hundreds of people, but months later, they still had no solid leads.

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5:27pm

Sat April 25, 2015
World

Turkey's Armenian Artists Honor Their Community's Past

Originally published on Sat April 25, 2015 6:23 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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5:27pm

Sat April 25, 2015
Music

Beauty Pill's 'Steven and Tiwonge' Is And Isn't A Protest Song

Originally published on Sun April 26, 2015 12:49 pm

Chad Clark of Beauty Pill wrote "Steven and Tiwonge" around how the two characters viewed a single object of affection.
Jon Pack Courtesy of the artist

On Sunday's All Things Considered, you'll hear Beauty Pill's amazing story of how close Chad Clark came to dying before a single note of Beauty Pill Describes Things As They Are could be recorded.

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6:05pm

Fri April 24, 2015
U.S.

What's That Smell? The Beautiful Tree That's Causing Quite A Stink

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 10:33 pm

Callery pear trees in Pittsburgh. The smell of the invasive trees has been compared to rotting fish and other stinky things.
Luke H. Gordon Flickr

It's springtime in Pittsburgh, and throughout the city, Callery pear trees are sprouting beautiful, white blossoms.

But that's just the problem. Simply put, these trees stink.

"This whole place smells like dead fish," says Sheila Titus. "I mean everywhere. Everywhere you see one of these trees with the white on them."

Titus has lived in her home in the now-hip neighborhood of Lawrenceville for 49 years. Two decades ago, her grandson and his 7th grade class planted a row of Callery pears across the street from her house.

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6:05pm

Fri April 24, 2015
Africa

Lawless Libya: The Jumping Off Point For Migrants Heading To Europe

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 6:55 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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5:55pm

Fri April 24, 2015
Parallels

Clearing The Tangled Path For Land Ownership In The West Bank

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 6:55 pm

One of the first homes going up on land bought and sold as part of a Canadian-Palestinian investment firm's effort to properly register plots. Much land in the West Bank is not registered and has no title deed, creating problems for economic development.
Emily Harris NPR

High on a West Bank hilltop, the extended Dissi family gathered on a recent weekend for a day out in the Palestinian countryside.

Aunts, uncles and cousins came to see the half-built weekend home of Taysier Dissi, an electrician and father of three. The concrete-block shell, with windows set and stairs roughed in, is placed just right for the view.

This will be the family's getaway from their home in the cramped confines of Jerusalem's often tense Old City. Dissi paid about $30,000 for one-third of an acre here, bought from a Palestinian-Canadian company, UCI.

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4:44pm

Fri April 24, 2015
U.S.

LGBT Activists Push States To Expand Anti-Discrimination Laws

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 8:27 pm

Same-sex marriage is legal in most states but so is discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in the areas of employment, housing and public accommodation.

Gay-rights activists say this creates a contradiction because in many states someone can legally marry a person of the same gender and then get fired for being gay. They are lobbying state legislatures to add LGBT people to anti-discrimination laws that already include things like race, age, religion and disability.

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4:40pm

Fri April 24, 2015
Around the Nation

Protests Continue In Baltimore Over Death Of Freddie Gray

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 6:55 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:40pm

Fri April 24, 2015
Health

HIV Outbreak In Indiana Grows With Nearly 140 Confirmed Cases

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 6:55 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

5:44pm

Thu April 23, 2015
All Tech Considered

Biometrics May Ditch The Password, But Not The Hackers

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 7:03 pm

Biometrics are increasingly replacing the password for user identification.
iStockphoto

Passwords get hacked — a lot. In an effort to move beyond passwords, big companies are embracing biometric technology: the use of fingerprints, iris scans or voice recognition for user identification.

To heighten security, smartphones are being outfitted with biometric features. But, ditching passwords for biometrics may not make the hackers go away.

Selfie Security

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5:06pm

Thu April 23, 2015
Space

'That's What Hubble Can See': A Tribute To The Space Telescope

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 7:29 pm

NPR has this tribute to the Hubble Space Telescope — a parody of Iggy Azalea's "Trouble."

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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5:06pm

Thu April 23, 2015
Politics

Lawmakers Urge Boehner To Act On Obama's Use Of Force Request

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 7:03 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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5:06pm

Thu April 23, 2015
Planet Money

'We Built A Robot That Types': The Man Behind Computerized Stock Trading

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 7:03 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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6:47pm

Wed April 22, 2015
The Salt

Buzz Over Bee Health: New Pesticide Studies Rev Up Controversy

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 11:58 am

A honeybee forages for nectar and pollen from an oilseed rape flower.
Albin Andersson/Nature

It has been about a decade since beekeepers and scientists began documenting a decline in honeybee populations and other important pollinators.

Even if you're not a lover of bees or honey, you should know that bees are critically important to our food supply. They help pollinate billions of dollars of crops each year, from apples and carrots to blueberries and almonds.

So if bees are threatened, ultimately, the production of these crops will be threatened, too.

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6:41pm

Wed April 22, 2015
Music Interviews

The Nearly Lost Story Of Cambodian Rock 'N' Roll

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 9:25 pm

Cambodian band Baksei Cham Krong.
Mol Kamach Courtesy of Argot Pictures

The tragic story of Cambodia in the '60s and '70s is well-known: It became engulfed in the Vietnam War, then more than a million Cambodians died under the Khmer Rouge regime. Doctors, lawyers, teachers — educated people — were targeted in the communist takeover. So were artists and singers.

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5:59pm

Wed April 22, 2015
Environment

White House Climate Change Policy Faces Legal Hurdle

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 7:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

5:59pm

Wed April 22, 2015
World

Yemen Crisis Creates Even Tougher Challenge For U.S. In Middle East

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 7:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

Where does Washington figure in all of this? Well, we're going to ask Nicholas Burns. He's professor of the practice of diplomacy and international politics at Harvard's Kennedy School. Welcome to the program once again.

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5:59pm

Wed April 22, 2015
Remembrances

Julian Koenig, Well-Known Adman, Named Earth Day

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 7:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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4:51pm

Wed April 22, 2015
Business

Comcast, Time Warner Push For Merger Approval Amid Opposition

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 8:17 am

Federal regulators are considering whether to approve the proposed $45 billion merger of Comcast and Time Warner Cable.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

Officials of Comcast and Time Warner Cable met Wednesday with federal regulators to discuss the companies' proposed $45 billion merger. The deal would create a single company that would control large parts of the cable TV and broadband Internet markets.

A published report said recently that Justice Department staff members have decided to oppose the deal on antitrust grounds. But company officials are using a lot of firepower to get the deal approved.

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4:31pm

Wed April 22, 2015
Performing Arts

Actors' Equity Implements $9 Minimum Wage For LA's Small Theaters

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 7:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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4:31pm

Wed April 22, 2015
Politics

California Senate Committee Approves Bill Removing Vaccine Exemptions

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 7:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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6:33pm

Tue April 21, 2015
The Salt

At Last: Kentucky Authorities Bust Ring Behind Great Bourbon Heist

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 12:56 pm

Pappy Van Winkle bourbons at Bourbons Bistro in Louisville, Ky. The spirit was pricey even before a heist at the distillery.
Noah Adams/for NPR

Finally, the great Kentucky bourbon mystery has been solved.

Back in 2013, more than 200 bottles of aging Pappy Van Winkle bourbon vanished from a locked, secure area of the Buffalo Trace distillery in Frankfort, Ky. Even before the heist, the bottles were rare — some fetched as much as $1,000 in private sales.

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5:47pm

Tue April 21, 2015
Law

Too Often, Some Say, Volunteer Officers Just Want To Play Cop

Originally published on Thu April 23, 2015 6:21 pm

Robert Bates (left), a Tulsa County, Okla., reserve deputy, leaves his arraignment Tuesday with his attorney. Bates fatally shot a suspect who was pinned down by officers, raising alarms about volunteer police officers who wear badges and carry guns.
Sue Ogrocki AP

Bob Ball is a real estate investor in Portland, Ore., but that's just his day job. For the past 20 years, he has also been a volunteer cop.

"When I was new, it was the best time of my life. I got to go out there and wear a white hat and help people and make a difference in my community, one little piece at a time," Ball says. "That's a very, very fulfilling thing to do."

This is real police work. On one occasion, Ball had to pull his gun on a guy threatening a woman with a knife.

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5:47pm

Tue April 21, 2015
NPR Ed

Teaching Students To Hear The Music In The Built World

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 9:31 am

Architecture professor Diana Agrest evaluates her students' work during a class critique at Cooper Union in New York.
LA Johnson NPR

What makes a great teacher great? That's the question at the heart of 50 Great Teachers, from the NPR Ed Team.

Diana Agrest believes architecture is so much more than a marriage of form and function. For more than four decades, she's been trying to get her students to believe that too.

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5:47pm

Tue April 21, 2015
The Salt

Millions Of Chickens To Be Killed As Bird Flu Outbreak Puzzles Industry

Originally published on Wed April 22, 2015 1:08 pm

Chickens stand in their cages at a farm near Stuart, Iowa, in 2009. This week, bird flu hit a large poultry facility in Iowa. It's not clear how the virus is evading the industry's biosecurity efforts.
Charlie Neibergall AP

Bird flu has been striking chicken and turkey farms in parts of the West and Midwest. This past week, it hit a flock of millions egg-laying chickens in northeastern Iowa. Update 4/22/2015: The USDA now says that around 3 million birds were affected in the Iowa facility — down from a previous estimate of 5 million.

Our original post continues below.

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