Your Goose Is Cooked

Jun 4, 2011
Originally published on June 5, 2011 6:29 pm

On-Air Challenge: Every answer is a compound word or familiar two-word phrase, in which the first word has a long O for its vowel sound and the second word has a long U. For example, given the clue "a traditional Christmas entrée," the answer would be "goose."

Last Week's Challenge: Think of two five-letter words that are exact opposites, in which the first two letters of each word are the same as the first two letters of the other, only reversed. Hint: The fourth letter of each word is A. What two words are these?

Answer: Urban and rural

Winner: Phil Jacknis of Dix Hills, N.Y.

Next Week's Challenge: From Mike Reiss, a former writer and producer for The Simpsons: Take the two-word title of a TV series. The first word contains a famous actor's first name in consecutive letters. The second word is a homophone for this actor's last name. Name the series and the actor.

Submit Your Answer

If you know the answer to next week's challenge, submit it here. Listeners who submit correct answers win a chance to play the on-air puzzle. Important: Include a phone number where we can reach you Thursday at 3 p.m. Eastern.

Copyright 2017 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

JACKI LYDEN, Host:

And joining us is puzzle master Will Shortz. Hello again, Will.

WILL SHORTZ: Hi, Jacki. Welcome back.

LYDEN: Thank you. So nice to hear you and Liane together last week, by the way.

SHORTZ: Yeah. It was bittersweet.

LYDEN: It was. So, what was the challenge you gave - I'll say the English thing - a fortnight ago, two weeks ago?

SHORTZ: Yes. I said think of two five-letter words that are exact opposites of each other, in which the first two letters of each word are the same as the first two letters of the other, only reversed. And I said the fourth letter of each word is A. What two words are these?

LYDEN: Two special words. What's the answer?

SHORTZ: Rural and urban.

LYDEN: Well, about 800 listeners submitted answers this go-around. And the winner is one Phil Jacknis of Dix Hills, New York. Hello there, Phil.

PHIL JACKNIS: Good morning, Jacki.

LYDEN: It's a great pleasure to have you with us. What do...

JACKNIS: Thank you. It's wonderful to be here.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

LYDEN: Your first time on the air with the puzzle.

JACKNIS: Oh, yes.

LYDEN: Good. So, what do you do in Dix Hills, Phil?

JACKNIS: Well, I'm an engineer. I work to support the software that the other engineers use to design my company's products.

LYDEN: So, it sounds like one of your hobbies might be the kinds of things that involve puzzles, puzzle design, puzzle complications?

JACKNIS: Well, I think an interest or aptitude in puzzles really is helpful in the work that I do. And I do enjoy solving puzzles.

LYDEN: So, are you ready to play with Will Shortz.

JACKNIS: I think I am, yes.

LYDEN: OK. Well, Will, meet Phil Jacknis.

SHORTZ: All right, Phil and Jacki. Today's puzzle is called O-U. Every answer is a compound word or familiar two-word phrase in which the first word has a long O for its vowel sound and the second word has a long U. For example, if I said traditional Christmas entree, you would say roast goose.

LYDEN: All right. Phil, are you set?

JACKNIS: I'm set but don't go away, please.

SHORTZ: Number one is: a mushroom.

JACKNIS: Mushroom.

SHORTZ: So, another term for a mushroom.

JACKNIS: I'm blanking on that.

LYDEN: I have it. I have it. Can I...

JACKNIS: Go for it.

LYDEN: ...can I tarry forth? Toad stool.

SHORTZ: Toad stool is it, good. Area in a building to hang hats and other outerwear.

JACKNIS: Cloakroom.

SHORTZ: Cloakroom or coatroom - either one works. To teach as kids not in a public institution.

JACKNIS: To teach as kids?

LYDEN: As kids?

SHORTZ: Uh, yes. If you...

JACKNIS: Home school.

SHORTZ: Home school is it.

LYDEN: Oh wow, excellent.

SHORTZ: A basic jump in figure skating.

JACKNIS: Basic jump. Well, we have an axle, we have...

SHORTZ: Simpler than that.

LYDEN: I'm thinking...

SHORTZ: You know this one...

LYDEN: ...about all those days and nights.

SHORTZ: ...Jacki....of watching the Winter Olympics.

JACKNIS: Yeah.

LYDEN: Yeah, this should come in.

SHORTZ: All right. I'll tell you this one. It's a toe loop.

LYDEN: Toe loop. All right. That's right.

SHORTZ: Try this one: a pithy sign held by someone opposed to atomic weapons.

JACKNIS: No nukes.

SHORTZ: That's it. Songs from Broadway.

JACKNIS: Show tunes.

SHORTZ: Good. Footwear for walking in the arctic, say.

JACKNIS: Snow shoes.

SHORTZ: Snow shoes, snow boots - either way works. Nickname for Snoopy in Peanuts when he's wearing dark sunglasses.

JACKNIS: Joe Cool.

SHORTZ: Joe Cool. Place to pay to cross a bridge, for example.

JACKNIS: Toll booth.

SHORTZ: That's it. If it takes a long time for you to explode in anger, you're said to have this.

JACKNIS: Slow fuse.

LYDEN: Yep.

SHORTZ: That's it. And your last one - the first word has two long O sounds. And your clue is: A session for taking pictures.

JACKNIS: Photo shoot.

SHORTZ: A photo shoot, good work.

LYDEN: Great job, Phil.

JACKNIS: Thank you.

LYDEN: You were awesome.

JACKNIS: Thanks for the help.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

LYDEN: And for playing our puzzle today, you'll get a WEEKEND EDITION lapel pin, a few other puzzle books and games that you can read about on our website, NPR.org/Puzzle. And before we let you go, tell us what member station you listen to.

JACKNIS: WNYC in New York.

LYDEN: And Dix Hills, is that on Long Island?

JACKNIS: Yes, it is. About 30 miles east of the city.

LYDEN: OK. I thought so. You're in Suffolk County. So, Phil Jacknis of Dix Hills, Suffolk County, New York, thanks for playing the puzzle this week.

JACKNIS: Thank you very much. Thank you, Will.

SHORTZ: Thanks, Phil.

LYDEN: That was fun. What's the challenge for next week?

SHORTZ: Yes. It comes from listener Mike Reese, who's a former writer and producer for "The Simpsons." Take the two-word title of a TV series. The first word contains a famous actor's first name in consecutive letters. The second word is a homophone for this actor's last name. Name the series and the actor. So again, the two-word title a TV series. The first word contains a famous actor's first name in consecutive letters. The second word is a homophone for this actor's last names. Name the series and the actor.

LYDEN: Have you been on that series?

SHORTZ: Yes, I have.

LYDEN: I thought so.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

LYDEN: Hope that this doesn't get us in any kind of trouble.

(SOUNDBITE OF LAUGHTER)

LYDEN: Will, thanks a lot. I'm looking forward to next week.

SHORTZ: Thanks a lot, Jacki, me too. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.