Special Solar Eclipse Day Coverage on August 21

Aug 17, 2017

It’s not a giant toad, wolf or even a dragon eating the sun but millions will see it disappear at least briefly on August 21st.

Dr. Richard Gelderman Professor Extra-Galactic Astrophysics Western Kentucky University, told our Eastern Standard listeners, "The sun disappears in the middle of the day, one of the transformational phenomena that is going to be one of the top memories you will ever have in your life." 


While we won’t experience “totality” in Central and Eastern Kentucky, we’re still expecting and impressive spectacle.

WEKU invites you to join us for our special coverage for much of the afternoon of August 21, including a special edition of Eastern Standard “live” from the EKU observation deck Monday afternoon at 2:00.

We'll be the guest of Dr. Mario Ciocca of the EKU Department of Physics and Astronomy. 

Below is the notice from Eastern Kentucky University, inviting the public to take part in a campus "viewing event."  

That's where we'll be and we'll look forward to seeing you there, maybe even talking to you on the air if you're interested.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE, AUG. 4, 2017

EKU TO HOST SOLAR ECLIPSE VIEWING EVENT AUG. 21

RICHMOND, Ky. – Eastern Kentucky University will host a free solar eclipse viewing event on Monday, Aug. 21.

The public is invited to the University’s observation deck across Kit Carson Drive from the Perkins Building and behind the Granny Richardson Springs One-Room Schoolhouse. Some parking is available at the deck (turn at the schoolhouse), and some additional parking will be available in the Perkins Lot.

Large telescopes (with solar filters) will be available for use, and each attendee will receive special eye ware for safely viewing the eclipse, which will be 95 percent in Madison County, according to Dr. Marco Ciocca, professor in the Department of Physics and Astronomy, who will be available to answer any questions.

The eclipse will start at approximately 1 p.m., reach its maximum at approximately 2:30 p.m. and conclude shortly before 4 p.m.

After the eclipse, Hummel Planetarium will offer a free viewing of its show, “Exploding Universe,” which targets those middle-school age and up.