Letters: Greek Yogurt; Summer Sounds

Originally published on August 23, 2011 6:23 pm
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MELISSA BLOCK, Host:

Today's letters are all about food. First up, Greek yogurt.

ROBERT SIEGEL, Host:

As we reported yesterday, it is growing in popularity. And we heard about the Greek yogurt demographic from David Palmer, who is a packaged-food industry analyst with UBS.

DAVID PALMER: You know, it's sort of what I would envision to be the Starbucks crowd. It's a higher-educated, higher-income user that resides in the Northeast.

BLOCK: Wait a minute - that's from Heather Kahn(ph) of Baton Rouge. She enjoyed our story, but she could have done without Mr. Palmer's comment. She writes this: I love Greek yogurt. I'm highly educated, and I live in the Deep South. Can that be right? In case Mr. Palmer forgot, Starbucks began in Seattle, about as far from the Northeast as you can get, not to mention that there are higher-educated, higher-income users all across this country. I could have done without the jab about the education and income level of consumers across America.

SIEGEL: Well, on to our next course: grapes. In what we thought would have been one of his less controversial commentaries, Andrei Codrescu brought us his "Summer Sound," his two dogs panting.

BLOCK: As he explained, both dogs get special treats. There's Sally Marie and then there's Lula.

ANDREI CODRESCU: Carefree Lula is practically a hippie. She'll gobble apple, grapes, peach and nuts. But they pant. They pant like overexerted athletes.

(SOUNDBITE OF PANTING)

BLOCK: Well, a number of you wrote in expressing concern for Andrei's dogs - not because of the panting, but because of the grapes.

SIEGEL: That's right. Alison Foucault(ph) is a veterinarian in San Diego. And she writes this: I just wanted to convey a message to Mr. Codrescu regarding giving grapes to Lula. Grapes and raisins can cause fatal renal failure in dogs, and we're not sure why nor exactly at which dose. Dogs seem to have different levels of sensitivity to them. And some have lived their whole life eating small amounts of grapes and been fine, but I have also seen too many die with ridiculously small amounts.

BLOCK: Well, we did pass that message along to Andrei. And he told us he was very grateful - or was it grapeful? - for the information.

SIEGEL: And we're grateful for your comments. Keep writing. Go to npr.org, and click on Contact Us. Transcript provided by NPR, Copyright NPR.