8:33am

Sun July 22, 2012
Kentucky Arts and Culture

Cars for Kids at Concours d'Elegance

Hundreds of classic automobiles and thousands of people gathered over the weekend at the Keeneland Race Course for the annual Concours d’Elegance.  Besides celebrating the history, engineering and artistry of vehicles like the Packard, the event was a fundraiser for Kentucky Children’s Hospital.  Staffing the first aid tent was pediatric physician Erich Maul. Maul says the funds will buy high tech mannequins that can be used in training exercises.

“What we’ll be able to do with these simulators is be able to simulate critically ill children either on the floor, in  back of ambulances, in the emergency department and allow our nurses and technicians and physicians to be able to practice resuscitating the fake patients without having any bad outcomes come towards real patients,” said Maul.

In the past, Maul says they could only learn by doing, while working with live patients.

Among the judges in the car show’s contemporary sports car class was Pamela Trautner of Commerce Lexington. Trautner says all-volunteer events like the Concours are essential to a strong community.

“The Keeneland Concours is such a wonderful example of how people in Lexington do volunteer, how they embrace causes, or events that help worthy causes, such as the Children’s Hospital,” said Trautner.

Classic vehicles, from a World War Two era half-track to a canvas covered micro-car, were on display over the weekend at Keeneland Race Course.  The Concours d’Elegance car show attracted about 150 entries.  Winning in the micro-car class for his 1958 Heinkel Kabine was Bjorn Golberg.

“They had a place in automotive history. When you look at how difficult it was to buy fuel in Europe in the late 50s…these cars get about 90 miles per gallon. So, they’re just really unusual. This one in particular because it was made by the Heinkel Aircraft Company, and you can see a lot of the aircraft technology in keeping the vehicle very light. It only weighs a little over 600 pounds,” said Golberg.

Winning best of show was a 1930 Stutz Lancefield Coupe, while the judges choice award went to a 1936 Delehaye.