With Career Spanning Six Decades, Graham Nash to Perform in Lexington

Jul 31, 2017

If any artist can be called a musical icon, it’s got to be Graham Nash.

The career of the British-born singer, songwriter and instrumentalist has spanned six decades. 


Graham Nash (on right) performs in an NPR Tiny Desk Concert with Shane Fontayne March 14, 2016
Credit NPR Music

We first heard of him when he was performing with the pop group, The Hollies.

The 75-year-old two-time Rock n Roll Hall of Famer says he sometimes starts his show with the acoustic version of the classic Bus Stop.

“I’ve got a lot music to play.  (John) “And so, every show, is the set list a little different for every show? (Graham) “Absolutely. That usually happens at sound check, when we go at like 4:00 and we make sure the equipment’s all plugged in and sounds right.  And then me and Shane start talking about, ‘Well we did this last night, let’s not do this tonight and let’s move on and do a different song.’ And so we set the set list at sound check.”   :28

Shane is electric guitarist and vocalist Shane Fontayne who’s traveling with Graham Nash on this tour.

That set list is certain to include songs from the 2016 album…This Path Tonight.

As a member of the Hollies, over fifty years ago, Graham Nash was part of a music revolution known as the "British invasion."

Their bright and peppy tunes began hitting the American top 40 charts in 1966.  But, a couple of years later, Nash came to America to team up with David Crosby and Stephen Stills.

“I’m just a guy from the north of England who escaped doing what his father did and what his grandfather did. You were supposed to go down into the mine or you were supposed to go into them mill.  My parents saw my passion for music and encouraged me instead of forcing me to get what people would call a real job.”

This guy from the north of England has written some of the songs that entertained and inspired a whole generation of music lovers…and beyond.

Songs such as, “Our House,” “Teach Your Children,” “Immigration Man,”  “Chicago”

Graham Nash is still creating new music today.

 “When you play in front of hundreds, sometimes thousands of people and they’re all applauding and the show’s over and you get on your bus and you make a cup of tee and nobody applauds, what do you do with that energy of having been adored for two hours? You get out your guitars and you start playing until you go to bed. And that’s what we do, we create music on the bus as we travel from city to city.

I’m just an antenna, really.  There’s music coming through. I don’t quite know how to explain what creation of music is. I’m not quite sure I understand it myself. I know that it happens to me and I know that I do produce music but, how I do that, I don’t know what that process is.  But it definitely starts with feeling something deeply.”

Graham Nash performs as part of the Troubadour Concert Series, Tuesday evening at 7:30 at the Lexington Opera House.