Stu Johnson, WEKU

Reporter/Producer - Lexington

Ways to Connect

Two of the most politically powerful men in Frankfort begin their battle for the governor’s mansion today.   Last night’s primary election results made it official. It was a given incumbent Democrat Steve Beshear would campaign to maintain his position as governor.  Beshearr had no primary opposition.  But, the other piece of the political puzzle...his Republican opponent... fell into place last night.

Highway construction is typically considered a part of the summer season.   This year is expected to be no different.  There are a number of projects in central Kentucky either underway or about to begin.  One which will begin in early June is the re-configuration of the Harrodsburg road-New circle interchange. 

Most politicians steer clear from discussions about ‘taxes.’ That’s particularly the case if the talk is about a new tax or a tax increase.  Still, ongoing concerns over Kentucky’s budget have some candidates in Tuesday’s primary talking about potential reforms.

Final preparations are being made for what’s believed to be Lexington’s first downtown chicken coop tour.  It’s called ‘Tour De Coops’ and the Sunday afternoon event is sponsored by Cooperative of Lexington Urban Chicken Keepers or Cluck.


Early next month, workers at Georgetown’s Toyota plant will be back on a full-time schedule.  The flow of supplies from Japan are moving now after a spring earthquake and tsunami slowed distribution. The March earthquake and tsunami in Japan caused a break in the automotive company’s system for distributing parts.  The resulting shortage resulted in fewer hours on the job for employees at the Scott County Toyota Assembly Plant.

During next week’s primary, as they have done for decades, members of the Democratic Party will choose their candidates and Republicans will do the same.  The system is called a ‘closed primary.’  It excludes voters without a party affiliation.  It also means voters registered in one party cannot vote in another party’s primary.  Now, there’s been discussion in one statewide office race about the pros and cons of opening up the Kentucky primary a bit.

An environmental group is investigating a potential chemical spill in a waterway near Jenkins, Kentucky.  On Tuesday evening, Clary Estes with Headwaters Incorporated says she saw four to five feet of foam in a southeast Kentucky stream.

Many charitable groups across the region collect donations at traffic lights.  But,  Lexington’s prohibition of such fundraisers will continue.  The Bluegrass Domestic Violence Program and Bluegrass Rape Crisis Center thinks fundraising at busy intersections is a good idea.  They want to model their Lexington effort after a highly successful campaign waged in Louisville.  However, councilmember Bill Farmer joined the majority in rejecting the proposal.


The three Republican candidates for governor gathered for a KET forum last night.  There were a few instances of argumentative disputes,  but the candidates also sought to identify their strengths. Louisville businessman Phil Moffett says his tea party candidacy is different from Rand Paul’s, another tea party member, who now serves in the US  Senate.


As temperatures warm, more motorcyclists are travelling Kentucky Roads.  Eastern Kentucky University played host Monday to the first International Rider Education Training System conference.

The primary election is just over a week away.  So, expect aggressive campaigning this week by the three Republican candidates for governor.  It may begin tonight’s during a gubernatorial forum on Kentucky Educational Television.    Political scientist Joe Gershtenson, who teaches at Eastern Kentucky University, says the primary seems to be ‘creeping up under the radar.’

Officials in charge of fixing Fayette County’s sewer problems are discussing potential costs.   City officials are examining three different options with three different rate plans.

Picking a winner from among the 20 horses in the Kentucky Derby is always a tough task.  This year is no different.  Keeneland’s President offered a little insight to Lexington Rotarians on Thursday.  He also talked about surprisingly high attendance figures during the just completed spring meet.

In April, over 12 inches of rain fell on parts of central Kentucky.  That runoff, on 22 occasions, flooded the city’s pump stations for 24 hours or more.  And the city says some of that raw sewage backed up into over 20 homes.  Lexington is working on a permanent fix but it could take another decade. Urban County Councilmember Doug Martin says some homeowners can’t wait that long.

Commercial and residential growth has traditionally been hotly debated in Lexington. It's not likely to change as government officials work to update the city's comprehensive plan. Planning director Chris King told council members Tuesday he welcomes public input.

Kentucky began before the civil war to establish its reputation as a horse breeding state. Woodburn farm in Woodford county was known then as a premiere breeding operation. The story is detailed by Maryjean Wall, a turf writer for more than three decades at the Lexington Herald newspaper. She's also the author of a book detailing the civil war's impact on the horse industry. Wall says the 1860's signified a break in the action and recovery took some time.


Apr 4, 2011

April means horse racing at Lexington’s Keeneland race track.  The historic track is celebrating 75 years of racing this year.  In recognition of the milestone, Keeneland spokeswoman, Julie Balog wants patrons to get involved.