Steve Inskeep

Steve Inskeep is host of Morning Edition, the most widely heard radio news program in the United States. He co-hosts with Renee Montagne.

Inskeep has traveled across the nation and around the world for Morning Edition and NPR News. From the Persian Gulf to the wreckage of New Orleans, he has interviewed presidents, warlords, authors, and musicians, as well as those who aren't in the headlines — from a steelworker in Ohio to a woman living in poverty in Tehran.

Inskeep's first full-time assignment for NPR was the 1996 presidential primary in New Hampshire. He went on to cover the Pentagon, the Senate, and the 2000 presidential campaign of George W. Bush.

After the September 11 attacks, Inskeep covered the war in Afghanistan, the hunt for al-Qaeda suspects in Pakistan, and the war in Iraq. In 2003, he received a National Headliner Award for investigating a military raid that went wrong in Afghanistan. He has twice been part of the NPR News team that was awarded an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for its coverage of Iraq.

In 2004, Inskeep joined a team that reshaped Morning Edition. Today Morning Edition aggressively covers breaking news, and also, in Inskeep's words, "tries to slow down the news – make sense of information that flies by too quickly, and check glib statements against the facts."

He led Morning Edition teams that hosted the program from New Orleans, Detroit, Karachi, and Tehran; investigated Iraqi police in Baghdad; and received a 2006 Robert F. Kennedy journalism award for "The Price of African Oil," a series on conflict in Nigeria.

During the 2008 Presidential campaign, Inskeep and NPR's Michele Norris co-hosted "The York Project," a groundbreaking series of conversations about race. Fifteen Pennsylvanians met to talk for hours about a subject that's constantly mentioned, yet not often frankly discussed. This series received a duPont silver baton for excellence.

Although his job often calls for him to deliver bad news, Inskeep looks for the humanity in hard times — and the humor. "I'm inspired," he says, "by the Langston Hughes book Laughing to Keep From Crying. And I'm inspired by people like the Bordelons, who've spoken with us ever since they rode out Hurricane Katrina. At the beginning, they sometimes laughed and cried in the same sentence. Laughter means you survived."

Before coming to NPR, Inskeep worked for public and commercial radio stations in and around New York City. He has written articles for publications including The New York Times and Washington Post. He is also the author of a forthcoming book on the world's growing urban areas, tentatively titled Instant City.

A native of Carmel, Indiana, Inskeep is a 1990 graduate of Morehead State University in Kentucky.

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5:30am

Thu November 24, 2011
NPR Story

In Bahrain, Report Details Abuses During Uprising

The U.S. State Department says it's urging the government of the Persian Gulf kingdom of Bahrain to act on the findings of a major human rights report that has just been issued. That report details the abuses that took place during and after a mass uprising in Bahrain that was styled after movements in Tunisia and Egypt. The report was commissioned by the government itself and assembled by a team of international legal experts. But it remains to be seen whether it will lead to real reform and dialogue between the ruling Sunni monarchy and the Shiite majority.

4:00am

Mon November 21, 2011
Africa

Egyptian Police, Protesters Clash For 3rd Day

Originally published on Mon November 21, 2011 6:50 am

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Linda Wertheimer.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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4:00am

Wed November 16, 2011
Politics

Debt Reduction Committee's Deadline Is 1 Week Away

Originally published on Wed November 16, 2011 7:02 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep, good morning.

Let's remember a bit of very recent history. Back in August, Congress came close to defaulting on U.S. government debts. Republicans wanted big cuts in spending. They finally got some, but a deal with President Obama pushed more deficit reductions off to the future, to a bipartisan committee which has been meeting this fall, and now has one week left until its deadline to reach a deal.

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4:00am

Tue November 15, 2011
Sports

Hopes Dim For NBA Season: Players Reject Offer

Originally published on Wed November 16, 2011 8:39 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

The pro basketball season had been getting canceled a couple of weeks at a time, but now the entire season could be lost. Players rejected last night what the owners said was their best offer. And the players made a dramatic move as well. They actually disbanded as a union. We're going to talk about this with NPR's Mike Pesca. He joins us from the studios of our member station WBUR in Boston.

Mike, good morning.

MIKE PESCA, BYLINE: Hello.

INSKEEP: Hope WBUR is taking good care of you up there.

PESCA: They are.

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4:00am

Mon November 14, 2011
Around the Nation

Penn State Update

Originally published on Mon November 14, 2011 6:39 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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6:52am

Wed November 9, 2011
Sports

Coach Joe Paterno's Future In Question At Penn State

The Penn State Board of Trustees says it will appoint a special committee to investigate a child sex abuse scandal. This is the case that engulfed the university, its football program and coach Joe Paterno. Former assistant football coach Jerry Sandusky is accused of repeatedly sexually abusing young boys over a 15-year period, sometimes in the Penn State locker room.

4:00am

Mon November 7, 2011
Analysis

Politics In The News

In less than two months, the first caucuses and primaries of the 2012 presidential election season will be held. And in just under two weeks, a congressional Supercommittee is due to deliver one-point-two trillion dollars in cuts and revenue to reduce the deficit.

5:46am

Fri November 4, 2011
Strange News

Employee Cleans Up German Artwork

A cleaning woman working at the Ostwall Museum in Berlin noticed a wet stain on the floor by a modern-art sculpture. She scrubbed away the stain, not realizing it was part of the piece called, "When It Starts Dripping From the Ceiling." Back in 1986, another cleaner in Germany wiped away a grease stain valued at 400,000 euros.

6:19am

Thu November 3, 2011
Strange News

When ATM Machines Bite Back

Originally published on Thu November 3, 2011 7:54 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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4:00am

Thu November 3, 2011
Around the Nation

Protesters Clash With Police In Oakland

About 3,000 people gathered at the Port of Oakland Wednesday, and effectively shut it down. People flooded the port area and blocked exits. The protest remained largely peaceful until the late evening, when police responded to a bonfire.

4:50am

Wed November 2, 2011
7 Billion And Counting

In Karachi, New Aspirations To Be A Global Player

The population of Karachi, Pakistan, has been boosted by a new influx of young people. And now the city, seen here during a political rally in January, is making a bid to attract global elites.

Rizwan Tabassum AFP/Getty Images

This week, we're asking what it really means to live in a world with 7 billion people. For some answers, we visit Karachi, Pakistan.

The grandest expression of the world's population growth is in the word "megacity." Dozens of these cities of more than 10 million now ring the globe, like a string of oversized pearls. In a megacity, people and ideas clash: The ancient collides with the modern; secular with religious; global with local. In Karachi, Pakistan, those forces can be seen in the story of a single piece of real estate.

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8:15am

Tue October 18, 2011
Middle East

Freed Soldier Gilad Shalit Returns To Israel

Looking thin, weary and dazed, Israeli soldier Gilad Shalit returned home Tuesday from more than five years of captivity in the Gaza Strip. In exchange, hundreds of Palestinian prisoners were released.

6:55am

Tue October 18, 2011
Africa

Hillary Clinton Travels To Libya

Secretary of State Hillary Clinton is visiting Libya, where she will meet with members of the National Transitional Council. This is the first time a cabinet-level official from the U.S. has traveled to Libya since 2008.

4:00am

Mon October 17, 2011
Economy

Occupy Wall Street Protests Spread To Europe

Originally published on Mon October 17, 2011 6:27 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Cleanup is under way in cities around the world after a weekend of protests. Tens of thousands of people turned out. They protested greedy bankers, inept politicians, government austerity, the growing gap between rich and poor, and above all, the system that runs the global economy.

There was some violence in Rome, dozens of arrests. Other places were more peaceful. And in London on this Monday, the protests are still going on. So let's talk about that and more with NPR's Philip Reeves, who's on the line. Hi, Philip.

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12:06pm

Mon October 10, 2011
NPR Story

Netflix Backpedals On Qwikster Service

The company says it is scuttling its plan to split off its DVD-by mail and streaming video services.

4:00am

Mon October 10, 2011
Middle East

Egypt's Military Clashes With Coptic Christians

Originally published on Mon October 10, 2011 12:22 pm

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. Violence in Cairo over the weekend reminds us that Egypt is mostly Muslim but not entirely so. Several million Egyptians are Coptic Christians. And it was members of that minority group who clashed with Egypt's military or the weekend. At least two dozen people are dead, hundreds wounded, the worst violence since Hosni Mubarak was driven from power in February.

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4:00am

Mon October 10, 2011
Economy

Nobel Prize For Economics To Be Announced

Thomas Sargent of New York University and Christopher A. Sims of Princeton University have won the Nobel Prize in economics. They won for their research on macroeconomics.

7:55am

Fri September 30, 2011
NPR Story

Details Emerge After Reports Of Awlaki's Death

Yemeni officials are saying Anwar al-Awlaki, a U.S.-born cleric linked to al-Qaida's arm in Yemen, was killed while traveling between two provinces in Yemen. Steve Inskeep talks to NPR's Dina Temple-Raston about reports of the death of Anwar al-Awlaki, a U.S.-born cleric linked to al-Qaida's arm in Yemen.

4:00am

Fri September 30, 2011
Europe

International Debt Inspectors Return To Greece

In Greece, financial inspectors returned Thursday to review whether the government was complying with the terms of a $150 billion bailout that it agreed to last year. But the inspectors were met with loud demonstrations protesting further wage and pension cuts, public sector layoffs and higher taxes.

7:33am

Fri September 23, 2011
Asia

Pakistan Deals With Flooding, Terrorism Accusations

Originally published on Fri September 23, 2011 7:34 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

And let's go next to Pakistan, the scene of both a natural disaster and political turmoil. And we'll talk about the disaster first. NPR's Julie McCarthy is on the line from a flood zone in southern Pakistan. Julie, hi. Where are you?

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4:00am

Mon September 19, 2011
Asia

U.S. Accuses Pakistan Of Harboring Haqqani Network

Originally published on Mon September 19, 2011 6:35 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, host: It's Morning Edition from NPR News. Good morning. I'm David Greene in for Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host: And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

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4:00am

Mon September 19, 2011
Analysis

Politics In The News

Originally published on Mon September 19, 2011 7:05 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, host: And you heard Scott say part of this is politics. Let's talk about that part with NPR's Cokie Roberts, who joins us most Mondays. Cokie, good morning once again.

COKIE ROBERTS: Hi. Hi, Steve.

INSKEEP: Glad you're with us. Glad you're with us.

ROBERTS: Yes. Good to be with you.

INSKEEP: Now, let's just note a couple of things that Scott said there. Speaker John Boehner said forget about new taxes and a couple of days later, we hear about the president's plan for a millionaires' tax. Why now?

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4:00am

Fri September 16, 2011
Politics

Politics In The News

Originally published on Fri September 16, 2011 8:23 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

Let's talk about politics, the economy and more with NPR national political correspondent Mara Liasson, who's on the line.

Mara, good morning.

MARA LIASSON: Good morning Steve.

INSKEEP: Okay, we heard Speaker Boehner's proposals having to do with this supercommittee that's supposed to reduce the deficit. The president takes his swing at this on Monday, right?

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4:00am

Wed September 14, 2011
Afghanistan

20-Hour Insurgent Attack Ends In Afghan Capital

Originally published on Wed September 14, 2011 7:07 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, host: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm David Greene.

STEVE INSKEEP, host: And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning.

An attack on Kabul, Afghanistan is over. Attackers took control of a building that had a clear line of fire down to the U.S. embassy and NATO headquarters in the heart of the city. And it's taken 20 hours for Afghan forces to finally clear that building. It is inside that building that we have found NPR's Renee Montagne and Quil Lawrence.

Hello to you both.

QUIL LAWRENCE: Good morning, Steve.

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8:14am

Tue September 13, 2011
Afghanistan

Afghan Insurgents Launch Multiple Attacks In Kabul

Originally published on Tue September 13, 2011 8:47 am

The Taliban is claiming responsibility for gunfire and explosions heard around the Afghan capital Kabul. Insurgents have been firing in the direction of the U.S. Embassy as well as other landmarks.

6:30am

Tue September 13, 2011
Afghanistan

Rockets Fired At U.S. Embassy In Kabul

Originally published on Tue September 13, 2011 8:47 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, Host:

President Obama left behind the debate in Washington yesterday to campaign for his jobs bill, which includes money to upgrade infrastructure. He visited the Brent Spence Bridge in Cincinnati, which is considered obsolete. NPR's Ari Shapiro reports.

ARI SHAPIRO: Gerardo Claudio lives in Augusta, Georgia, and works all over the country. He spends about three weeks out of every month on the road, which gives him a good look at the nation's infrastructure.

GERARDO CLAUDIO: The roads are in real, real awful condition, should I say.

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4:00am

Mon September 12, 2011
Afghanistan

77 U.S. Troops Injured In Afghan Truck Bomb

Late Saturday night, a Taliban truck bomb ripped through a military base in eastern Afghanistan, injuring 77 U.S. troops. It also sent shrapnel up to a mile away, killing an Afghan policeman and four civilians.

8:08am

Tue September 6, 2011
Africa

Libyan Rebels Block Gadhafi Stronghold Bani Walid

The town of Bani Walid is the latest location of a front line in the war to capture the final strongholds of ousted leader Moammar Gadhafi. Over the weekend, efforts to negotiate the town's surrender broke down. The talks have resumed, even as rebels threaten to attack.

6:48am

Mon September 5, 2011
Business

So Long, Snooze Button

The latest batch of high-tech alarm clocks explode, roll away, fly away and even make you solve math problems to keep you from oversleeping.

5:58am

Mon September 5, 2011
Business

Asian Markets Tumble

Stock exchanges across Asia dropped sharply Monday after Friday's dismal U.S. employment report showing no new jobs were added in August. Japan's Nikkei index fell nearly 2 percent — with markets in South Korea, Hong Kong and Shanghai also posting major losses. Investors remain concerned by the possibility of another recession in the U.S., where markets are closed Monday for Labor Day.

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