Steve Inskeep

Steve Inskeep is host of Morning Edition, the most widely heard radio news program in the United States. He co-hosts with Renee Montagne.

Inskeep has traveled across the nation and around the world for Morning Edition and NPR News. From the Persian Gulf to the wreckage of New Orleans, he has interviewed presidents, warlords, authors, and musicians, as well as those who aren't in the headlines — from a steelworker in Ohio to a woman living in poverty in Tehran.

Inskeep's first full-time assignment for NPR was the 1996 presidential primary in New Hampshire. He went on to cover the Pentagon, the Senate, and the 2000 presidential campaign of George W. Bush.

After the September 11 attacks, Inskeep covered the war in Afghanistan, the hunt for al-Qaeda suspects in Pakistan, and the war in Iraq. In 2003, he received a National Headliner Award for investigating a military raid that went wrong in Afghanistan. He has twice been part of the NPR News team that was awarded an Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton for its coverage of Iraq.

In 2004, Inskeep joined a team that reshaped Morning Edition. Today Morning Edition aggressively covers breaking news, and also, in Inskeep's words, "tries to slow down the news – make sense of information that flies by too quickly, and check glib statements against the facts."

He led Morning Edition teams that hosted the program from New Orleans, Detroit, Karachi, and Tehran; investigated Iraqi police in Baghdad; and received a 2006 Robert F. Kennedy journalism award for "The Price of African Oil," a series on conflict in Nigeria.

During the 2008 Presidential campaign, Inskeep and NPR's Michele Norris co-hosted "The York Project," a groundbreaking series of conversations about race. Fifteen Pennsylvanians met to talk for hours about a subject that's constantly mentioned, yet not often frankly discussed. This series received a duPont silver baton for excellence.

Although his job often calls for him to deliver bad news, Inskeep looks for the humanity in hard times — and the humor. "I'm inspired," he says, "by the Langston Hughes book Laughing to Keep From Crying. And I'm inspired by people like the Bordelons, who've spoken with us ever since they rode out Hurricane Katrina. At the beginning, they sometimes laughed and cried in the same sentence. Laughter means you survived."

Before coming to NPR, Inskeep worked for public and commercial radio stations in and around New York City. He has written articles for publications including The New York Times and Washington Post. He is also the author of a forthcoming book on the world's growing urban areas, tentatively titled Instant City.

A native of Carmel, Indiana, Inskeep is a 1990 graduate of Morehead State University in Kentucky.

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6:48am

Mon September 5, 2011
Business

So Long, Snooze Button

The latest batch of high-tech alarm clocks explode, roll away, fly away and even make you solve math problems to keep you from oversleeping.

5:58am

Mon September 5, 2011
Business

Asian Markets Tumble

Stock exchanges across Asia dropped sharply Monday after Friday's dismal U.S. employment report showing no new jobs were added in August. Japan's Nikkei index fell nearly 2 percent — with markets in South Korea, Hong Kong and Shanghai also posting major losses. Investors remain concerned by the possibility of another recession in the U.S., where markets are closed Monday for Labor Day.

10:42am

Fri September 2, 2011
NPR Story

August Jobless Rate Remained 9.1 Percent

The Labor Department reported Friday that the nation's jobless rate remained unchanged at 9.1 percent in August, as employers added no new workers.

4:00am

Wed August 31, 2011
Economy

Will Hurricane Cleanup Help Stimulate The Economy?

Hurricane Irene is likely to cost billions of dollars. The storm did damage but not as much as some had feared. Will the sales of batteries and flashlights – and then repair costs – give the economy a needed boost?

4:00am

Wed August 31, 2011
Politics

Budget Cuts Threaten NOAA's Weather Forecasts

Communities on the East Coast planned for hurricane Irene with help from analysts at the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration. NOAA forecasters use data from federally-funded weather satellites to predict storms. One of those satellite programs is facing deep cuts in the latest round of congressional belt-tightening.

4:00am

Tue August 30, 2011
Africa

Gadhafi Family Members Flee Libya To Algeria

Many of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi's family members have turned up in Algeria. It's not known if Gadhafi is with them. The Algerian Foreign Ministry said in a statement that Gadhafi's wife Safia, his sons Hannibal and Mohammed, and his daughter Aisha entered the country across the land border.

4:00am

Mon August 29, 2011
Analysis

Politics: Irene Is Not Just A Weather Story

Major storms like Hurricane Irene often bring with them political consequences. Over the last few days, politicians from the president on down to local mayors, have been showing up on the airwaves.

4:00am

Mon August 29, 2011
Around the Nation

Big Apple Reboots After Shutting Down For Irene

Originally published on Mon August 29, 2011 6:35 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning Im David Greene. Renee Montagne is on assignment in Afghanistan.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And Im Steve Inskeep.

The nation's largest city works to return to business today after the flooding from Irene.

GREENE: New York took a direct hit from the storm. The destruction was not as awful in New York as some feared. Still, this is a metropolitan area of more than 19 million people.

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12:01am

Mon August 29, 2011
Closing Walter Reed

Where Generations Of Soldiers Healed, And Moved On

Tyson Quink exercises at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, MD. Quink, a former college football player, lost both of his legs three months into his deployment to Afghanistan.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

On a recent morning, John Pierce walked across the sprawling hospital campus of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. On the lawn, he spotted people who have come to define the place in recent years.

"[They were] having physical fitness-type tests," Pierce says. "There were people with notebooks and things, like they record when you do your sit-ups and pushups — but these were a number of double amputees."

Pierce is the historian for the Walter Reed Society, which makes him an expert on the historic American hospital in Washington, D.C.

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10:37am

Mon August 8, 2011
Economy

U.S. Markets Drop After S&P Downgrade

Investors reacted to Standard & Poor's downgrade of American credit by selling off U.S. stocks. Monday was the first trading day since S&P downgraded the U.S. government's credit rating on Friday.

4:00am

Mon August 8, 2011
Economy

Financial Markets Respond To U.S. Credit Downgrade

Originally published on Mon August 8, 2011 8:34 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, host:

This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Renee Montagne.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And I'm Steve Inskeep. Good morning. This is one of those mornings when we remember how interconnected the world economy has become. Asian investors are worried about their exports to America. Europeans are responding to their own continent's debt problems, even as they react to the Standard and Poor's downgrade in its rating of U.S. credit. And of course the Dow Jones Industrials, we'll find out how they do today.

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4:00am

Fri August 5, 2011
World

Asian, European Markets Rattled By U.S. Losses

It's the end of a turbulent week that started with the U.S. government narrowly averting a failure to pay its bills. A market selloff that began some days before has continued all week. The Dow lost 512 points Thursday alone. European stock markets were down Friday. Asian markets fell, too.

4:00am

Fri July 29, 2011
Africa

Libyan Rebel Leader's Death Fuels Fears Of Fracturing

The military commander of Libya's rebel forces, Gen. Abdel Fattah Younis, was killed Thursday just before arriving for questioning by rebel authorities.

4:00am

Tue July 26, 2011
Asia

China Orders Safety Checks After Bullet Train Crash

The deadly collision involving two bullet trains in China last weekend is only one of many problems in the country's high-speed rail network. It's also plagued by corruption, undermining safety standards. A proud technological achievement has become an embarrassment.

4:00am

Mon July 18, 2011
Afghanistan

Adviser To Afghan President Killed In Attack

In Afghanistan, a close adviser to President Hamid Karzai has been killed. It was the second killing in recent days of one of Karzai's allies. Last week, Karzia's half-brother was killed in the southern city of Kandahar.

4:00am

Thu July 14, 2011
Media

Murdoch's News Corp. Still In Damage Control Mode

Rupert Murdoch's media company has been under fire for a phone-hacking scandal in Britain. On Wednesday, News Corp. announced it was withdrawing a bid to buy full interest in the British broadcast company BSkyB. Murdoch has suffered a stunning loss of political influence in Britain.

5:21am

Tue July 12, 2011
Afghanistan

Karzai's Half-Brother Assassinated In Kandahar

In Afghanistan, the half-brother of President Hamid Karzai was assassinated at his home in the southern part of the country, in the city of Kandahar Tuesday. Ahmed Wali Karzai was repeatedly accused of corruption and of having links to drug trafficking, yet the Afghan president continued to defend him.

4:00am

Mon July 11, 2011
Sports

U.S. Beats Brazil In Women's Soccer World Cup

The U.S. women's soccer team beat Brazil in a stunning penalty-kick shoot-out in the quarterfinals of the women's World Cup Sunday.

6:39am

Fri July 8, 2011
Space

Space View Park Perfect To See Atlantis Launch

After 30 years of space shuttle takeoffs, crowds are gathered at Space View Park in Titusville, Fla., to see the final launch of Atlantis.

6:31am

Fri July 8, 2011
Space

Shuttle's Final Launch Gets Mega Attention

Weather permitting, the space shuttle Atlantis will bast off Friday for the last time at the Kennedy Space Center in Florida.

4:00am

Mon July 4, 2011
Africa

Southern Sudan Set To Become Newest Nation

Steve Inskeep talks to NPR's Ofeibea Quist-Arcton, who is in southern Sudan, which becomes the world's newest nation on July ninth. It comes six years after a peace deal that ended a two-decade civil war between Sudan's north and south.

4:00am

Fri July 1, 2011
Law

Sex Case Against Ex-IMF Head May Be Unraveling

The former head of the International Monetary Fund Dominique Strauss-Kahn has another court appearance Friday. He's charged with assaulting a hotel maid in Manhattan in May. Friday's proceeding is being described as one that could ease his bail conditions. Sources say government officials have uncovered inconsistencies and possible misstatements by his accuser.

4:00am

Thu June 23, 2011
Law

Feds Capture Fugitive James 'Whitey' Bulger In Calif.

A notorious Boston gangster has been captured by authorities near Los Angeles. James "Whitey" Bulger is on the FBI's "Ten Most Wanted" list for his alleged role in 19 murders. The 81-year-old has been on the run for 16 years.

12:01am

Fri June 10, 2011
World

Is Pakistan's Military Facing An Enemy Within?

Pakistani sailors parade during a rehearsal for a National Day ceremony in Islamabad in 2005. Before a militant raid on a naval base in Karachi last month, a number of navy personnel were detained on suspicion of links to al-Qaida, security officials say.
Jewel Samad AFP/Getty Images

Have al-Qaida and other militant groups wormed into Pakistan's military?

It's an explosive question, considering that Pakistan's armed forces are vital U.S. allies and also guardians of a stockpile of nuclear weapons. And that was the question a Pakistani journalist addressed in an article written shortly before he was murdered last week.

Saleem Shahzad reported on last month's militant attack on a Pakistani naval base in Karachi. He quoted anonymous sources who linked that attack to the discovery of suspected al-Qaida operatives inside the navy itself.

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12:01am

Mon June 6, 2011
Asia

Pakistan, Militants In Deadly Border Fight

Frontier Constabulary soldiers drill on the parade ground at Shabqadar Fort. Their traditions date back to the 1920s, when the British founded this force to patrol what was then part of India.
Jim Wildman NPR

There is worry that violent militants inside Pakistan could destabilize the country.

American officials want Pakistan to intensify its fight against those militants because they complicate the U.S. war in Afghanistan. Pakistan has repeatedly driven out the Taliban from tribal zones near its border with Afghanistan. But the militants won't stay beaten.

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12:01am

Fri June 3, 2011
Asia

Aid To Pakistan: Too Much Or Too Little?

How did people come to such wildly different conclusions about American aid to Pakistan?

Some Americans seem to have concluded it's a waste of $20 billion. Yet in Lahore, the Pakistani newspaper editor Najam Sethi suggested to me that Pakistan has hardly received any help at all. "It's peanuts," Sethi said.

The answer lies in the incredible complexity of Pakistan, as well as the complexity of sending aid halfway around the world. Nothing about the story is as simple as it seems.

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12:01am

Fri June 3, 2011
Asia

Among Pakistanis, Questions About U.S. Aid

The United States has spent more than $20 billion on Pakistan over the past decade, prompting some Americans to ask what they are getting for the money. America is deeply unpopular in Pakistan and after the killing of al-Qaida leader Osama bin Laden, Pakistani politicians unleashed a wave of criticism of the United States.

To understand why U.S. aid has not made more friends, NPR came to the gates of Forman Christian College in Lahore, founded for Christian and Muslim students by the Presbyterian Church and in recent years financed in part by the U.S. government.

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12:01am

Fri May 27, 2011
Asia

In Pakistan, Doubts Bin Laden Is Dead

We're on a crowded shopping street in Lahore, Pakistan, alongside the shrine to Data Ganj Baksh, one of the holiest places in the country. The shrine of a Muslim saint, it's a giant rectangle surrounded on all sides by giant white stone arches. This location was bombed last year. So we thought Thursday night, a very busy night at the shrine, would be a good night to ask people about what's happening in Pakistan.

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4:00am

Fri April 29, 2011
Around the Nation

Obama To Tour Alabama's Tornado Damage

In Alabama Friday, President Obama and the first lady will meet with families whose homes were destroyed by tornadoes. Gov. Robert Bentley will show the Obamas storm damage as search and rescue crews keep looking for survivors.

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