Scott Neuman

Scott Neuman works as a Digital News writer and editor, handling breaking news and feature stories for NPR.org. Occasionally he can be heard on-air reporting on stories for Newscasts and has done several radio features since he joined NPR in April 2007, as an editor on the Continuous News Desk.

Neuman brings to NPR years of experience as an editor and reporter at a variety of news organizations and based all over the world. For three years in Bangkok, Thailand, he served as an Associated Press Asia-Pacific desk editor. From 2000-2004, Neuman worked as a Hong Kong-based Asia editor and correspondent for The Wall Street Journal. He spent the previous two years as the international desk editor at the AP, while living in New York.

As the United Press International's New Delhi-based correspondent and bureau chief, Neuman covered South Asia from 1995-1997. He worked for two years before that as a freelance radio reporter in India, filing stories for NPR, PRI and the Canadian Broadcasting System. In 1991, Neuman was a reporter at NPR Member station WILL in Champaign-Urbana, IL. He started his career working for two years as the operations director and classical music host at NPR member station WNIU/WNIJ in DeKalb/Rockford, IL.

Reporting from Pakistan immediately following the September 11, 2001 attacks, Neuman was part of the team that earned the Pulitzer Prize awarded to The Wall Street Journal for overall coverage of 9/11 and the aftermath. Neuman shared in several awards won by AP for coverage of the December 2004 Asian tsunami.

A graduate from Purdue University, Neuman earned a Bachelor's degree in communications and electronic journalism.

Pages

6:49pm

Tue November 12, 2013
The Two-Way

Hawaii's Senate Gives Final Approval To Same-Sex Marriage

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 7:10 pm

Hawaii state Sen. Clayton Hee playfully gives Gov. Neil Abercrombie a kiss on the head before he signs the Hawaii Civil Unions bill into law at a ceremony in February 2011 in Honolulu.
Eugene Tanner AP

Hawaii's Senate has given the OK to a bill allowing same-sex marriage, which now goes to the governor, who is expected to sign.

Gay marriage is legal in 14 states and the District of Columbia. Illinois passed a similar law last week, which is awaiting the governor's signature.

Reuters says the measure in Hawaii cleared the state Senate on a 19-4 vote, with the chamber's lone Republican joining three Democrats to oppose the bill.

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5:02pm

Tue November 12, 2013
The Two-Way

Administration Invites HealthCare.gov Users To Try Again

Originally published on Tue November 12, 2013 8:11 pm

A woman looks at the HealthCare.gov insurance exchange internet site October 1, 2013.
Karen Bleier AFP/Getty Images

If at first you don't succeed, try again.

That's the message from the White House on Tuesday, with the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) asking more than 275,000 people who tried and failed to sign up for health plans on the stalled HealthCare.gov website to give it another shot.

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3:55pm

Tue November 12, 2013
The Two-Way

Nigerian Pirates Free Kidnapped U.S. Mariners

Fighters with the Movement for the Emancipation of the Niger Delta (MEND), pictured in 2008. The rebel group claimed responsibility for the kidnapping.
Pius Utomi Ekpei AFP/Getty Images

Two U.S. crewmembers seized last month from a ship off the coast of Nigeria have been released by their pirate captors, the State Department said Tuesday.

The captain and engineer from the U.S.-flagged C-Retriever, a 222-foot offshore resupply, were abducted on Oct. 23 when gunman boarded the vessel.

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2:54pm

Tue November 12, 2013
The Two-Way

China's Leaders Unveil Economic Reforms

Plainclothes policemen guard in front of Tiananmen Gate outside the Great Hall of the People where the Communist Party's 205-member Central Committee gathered for its third annual plenum on Tuesday.
Feng Li Getty Images

China's leaders have laid out a plan to wrest a bigger chunk of the country's economy from state control and turn it over to the free market in hopes of stimulating growth and curb corruption.

At the end of the four-day Third Plenum meeting, Communist Party leaders said that state ownership would continue to play a key role in the economy, but endorsed more private ownership.

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5:18pm

Mon November 11, 2013
The Two-Way

Storm Surge And Low-Lying Philippines Made A Deadly Combination

Originally published on Mon November 11, 2013 6:03 pm

Residents wade through flood waters on Sunday in Tacloban City, Leyte, Philippines, in the aftermath of Typhoon Haiyan.
Jeoffrey Maitem Getty Images

The worst part of Typhoon Haiyan, which is thought to have killed as many as 10,000 people in the Philippines, was storm surge, NPR's Christopher Joyce reports on All Things Considered.

Joyce spoke with storm surge expert Carl Drews, of the National Center for Atmospheric Research in Colorado. Dawes says the surge was greatest at Tacloban City, where the Leyte Gulf narrows into the San Pedro and San Pablo Bay.

"That is about the worst path and the worst place for surge," Drews says.

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3:22pm

Mon November 11, 2013
The Two-Way

Police: Indie Musicians Killed By Former Bandmate In NYC

Police say three musicians, two from an Iranian-American indie rock group, were shot and killed early Monday and a fourth person was wounded in the East Williamsburg area of Brooklyn, New York. The alleged assailant, who took his own life, was also a musician, they said.

According to The Associated Press:

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2:23pm

Tue October 15, 2013
The Two-Way

Report: NSA Harvests Contact Lists From Email, Facebook

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 6:12 pm

The Washington Post has published new revelations about the National Security Agency's electronic snooping, indicating that the intelligence branch gathers millions of contact lists from personal email accounts and instant messaging around the world.

The new information is attributed by The Post to "senior intelligence officials and top-secret documents provided by former NSA contractor Edward Snowden."

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8:56am

Tue October 15, 2013
The Two-Way

Second Dry Ice Bomb Goes Off At LA Airport

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 1:50 pm

A photograph taken last month of the south concourse of LA International Airport's Tom Bradley International Terminal.
Reed Saxon AP

This post was updated at 11:30 a.m.

Authorities in Los Angeles were investigating a dry ice bomb that went off at the city's international airport late Monday — the second blast in as many days. Two other devices were found unexploded.

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8:11am

Tue October 15, 2013
The Two-Way

Leaders Express 'Cautious Optimism' Over Iran Nuclear Plan

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 3:39 pm

Catherine Ashton, the EU high representative for foreign affairs, and Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif share a light moment Tuesday at the start of two-day talks on Iran's nuclear program.
Fabrice Coffrini AP

Iran's proposal for easing the standoff over its nuclear program got seemingly positive initial reviews at Tuesday's start of multiparty talks in Geneva.

A spokesman for EU foreign policy chief Catherine Ashton said the Iranian delegation had made a PowerPoint presentation outlining the plan at the beginning of the two-day session. The spokesman said the plan had been received with "cautious optimism" but gave no further details of the close-door meeting, describing the proceedings as "confidential."

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7:10am

Tue October 15, 2013
The Two-Way

On Capitol Hill, A Flurry Of Activity But Still No Deal

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 11:16 pm

House Speaker John Boehner (center) and House Majority Whip Rep. Kevin McCarthy (right) arrive for a Republican caucus meeting at the U.S. Capitol.
Jonathan Ernst Reuters/Landov
(This post was last updated at 11:05 p.m. ET)

With a little more than a day to go before the nation potentially defaults on its debts, there's still no solid plan on the table in Washington.

There was a flurry of activity on Tuesday, but it produced little significant movement.

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1:57pm

Fri October 11, 2013
The Two-Way

Air Force Fires Top U.S. Missile Commander

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 4:20 pm

The launch-key mechanism at the deactivated Delta Nine Launch Facility near Wall, S.D., in 2002.
AP

The Air Force two-star general in charge of the country's land-based intercontinental ballistic missiles has been relieved of his command for what's being described as questionable behavior during a temporary duty assignment.

Maj. Gen. Michael Carey, who led the 20th Air Force, headquartered at Warren Air Force Base, Wyo., has been dismissed, according to a statement issued by the Air Force Global Strike Command.

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11:09am

Fri October 11, 2013
The Two-Way

Report: Syrian Rebels Executed Pro-Regime Villagers

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 12:59 pm

Rebel fighters from the Al-Ezz bin Abdul Salam Brigade train at an undisclosed location near the al-Turkman mountains in Latakia province, Syria, in April.
Miguel Medina AFP/Getty Images

Human Rights Watch has accused Islamist Syrian rebels of slaughtering nearly 200 unarmed civilians belonging to the minority Alawite sect and kidnapping hundreds more during an offensive against pro-regime villages.

The New York-based group issued a 105-page report on Friday outlining the atrocities it says were committed on Aug. 4 in more than a dozen villages in Latakia province.

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8:20am

Fri October 11, 2013
The Two-Way

Top Stories: Nobel Peace Prize; Movement (Maybe) On Shutdown

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 11:42 am

Good morning, here are our early stories:

-- Chemical Weapons Watchdog Gets Nobel Peace Prize

-- No Deal Yet, But Maybe An Opening

And here are more early headlines:

Syria's Rebels Executed Civilians, Say Human Rights Watch (BBC)

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7:49am

Fri October 11, 2013
The Two-Way

No Deal Yet, But Maybe An Opening

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 4:37 pm

Speaker of the House John Boehner during a news conference with members of the House Republican leadership at the U.S. Capitol on Thursday morning.
Win McNamee Getty Images

It's groundhog day — again — in Washington. Friday is playing out a lot like Thursday — that is, a lot of sound and fury, but very little clarity about what it all signifies.

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7:36am

Fri October 11, 2013
The Two-Way

Chemical Weapons Watchdog Gets Nobel Peace Prize

Originally published on Fri October 11, 2013 11:05 am

A United Nations vehicle carrying inspectors from the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW) leaves a hotel in Damascus, on Wednesday. Some 19 OPCW arms experts are in Syria and have started to destroy weapons production facilities.
Louai Behara AFP/Getty Images

The Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons, a watchdog group that is overseeing efforts in Syria to eliminate its chemical stockpile, has won the Nobel Peace Prize.

The group, based in The Hague, Netherlands, was formed in 1997. "Since then the OPCW has, through inspections, destruction and by other means, sought the implementation of the convention. 189 states have acceded to the convention to date," the Nobel committee said.

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12:16pm

Thu October 10, 2013
The Two-Way

After White House Meeting, Both Sides Agree To Keep Talking

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 7:48 pm

House Speaker John Boehner of Ohio arrives on Capitol Hill on Thursday.
Susan Walsh AP
This post was last updated at 7:19 p.m. ET.

After an hour-long meeting with President Obama, Republicans said they have agreed to keep talking, in hopes of bridging a gulf that has already led to a government shutdown and is threatening the first default in U.S. history.

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11:51am

Thu October 10, 2013
The Two-Way

Treasury Secretary: Debt Default Would Have Dire Consequences

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 1:49 pm

Treasury Secretary Jack Lew testifies during a Senate Finance Committee hearing on Thursday.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew urged lawmakers on Thursday to raise the government's borrowing limit or face the prospect of causing lasting damage to the U.S. economy.

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9:43am

Thu October 10, 2013
The Two-Way

Malala Yousafzai Awarded Sakharov Prize

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 1:33 pm

Malala Yousafzai addresses students and faculty after receiving the 2013 Peter J. Gomes Humanitarian Award at Harvard University in Cambridge, Mass., last month.
Jessica Rinaldi AP

Pakistani teenager Malala Yousafzai, who was shot last year by Taliban militants for her advocacy of girls' education, has been awarded the Sakharov Prize for Freedom of Thought by European lawmakers.

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8:19am

Thu October 10, 2013

7:39am

Thu October 10, 2013
The Two-Way

Shutdown Day 10: Obama, GOP To Meet Amid Signs Of Possible Thaw

Originally published on Wed October 23, 2013 11:04 am

Chairman of the House Budget Committee Paul Ryan at the U.S. Capitol on Thursday. Ryan has outlined the framework of a possible deal on the federal shutdown and the debt ceiling.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

It's Day 10 of the partial federal government shutdown, and the big news is a meeting between President Obama and a select group of House Republicans.

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6:54am

Thu October 10, 2013
The Two-Way

Libyan PM Freed After Being Held For Hours By Gunmen

Originally published on Thu October 10, 2013 11:44 am

Libyan's Prime Minister Ali Zeidan speaks to the media during a news conference in Rabat, Morocco, on Tuesday, two days before he was abducted.
Abdeljalil Bounhar AP

Libya's Prime Minister Ali Zeidan was abducted Thursday by gunmen reportedly affiliated with former rebels. Hours later, he was suddenly freed.

Government spokesman Mohammed Kaabar said Zeidan has been "set free" and was on his way to the office, according to the LANA news agency.

Update At 8:50 a.m. ET. Reuters, which originally reported that Zeidan had tweeted that he was fine after his release, has withdrawn the story, saying the Twitter account was fake.

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2:40pm

Wed October 9, 2013
The Two-Way

Shinseki: Shutdown Means Veterans Will Not Get Benefits

Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki testifies on Capitol Hill in April.
Evan Vucci AP

Veterans Affairs Secretary Eric Shinseki warned lawmakers on Wednesday that the partial government shutdown means that about 3.8 million veterans will not receive disability compensation next month.

Shinseki, in testimony before the House Committee on Veterans' Affairs, said pensions to more than half a million vets or surviving spouses will also be derailed if the stalemate over a temporary spending measure drags on into late October.

The Associated Press reports:

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12:15pm

Wed October 9, 2013
The Two-Way

NYPD Officer Charged In Connection With Videotaped Biker Attack

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 3:13 pm

Edwin Mieses Jr.'s family provided this photo of the motorcyclist struck by an SUV during a rally in New York last month. Doctors put Mieses in a medically induced coma.
AP

An undercover New York City police officer has been arrested and charged in connection with the beating of an SUV driver last month by a group of motorcyclists. The attack was videotaped and went viral on YouTube.

Wojciech Braszczok, 32, was part of the motorcycle rally on Sept. 29. As The Associated Press says, the rally "began with a reckless motorcycle group ride on a Manhattan highway ... [and ended when] one motorcyclist was run over, and the SUV driver was dragged from behind the wheel and beaten on a street."

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11:19am

Wed October 9, 2013
The Two-Way

Boston School Bus Drivers Back Behind The Wheel After Strike

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 3:52 pm

School buses sit idle in a lot at Veolia Transportation, Boston's school bus contractor, on Tuesday
Stephan Savoia AP

Hundreds of Boston school bus drivers are back on the job following a one-day strike that sent parents scrambling to find ways to get their kids to and from school.

The drivers' union said Wednesday that it had agreed to return to work after the company contracted by the school to run bus services, Veolia Transportation Inc., agreed to a meeting with the union. About 600 drivers had walked off the job.

Boston.com says:

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10:41am

Wed October 9, 2013
The Two-Way

U.S. Suspending Millions In Military Aid To Egypt

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 5:36 pm

Armored vehicles blocking Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, in August.
Amr Nabil AP

Update at 4:39 p.m. ET. Recalibrating Assistance:

The State Department says the U.S. is "recalibrating" the assistance it provides Egypt.

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8:22am

Wed October 9, 2013

8:12am

Wed October 9, 2013
The Two-Way

All Talk And No Do: Latest On The Shutdown And Debt Ceiling

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 12:53 pm

The skies over the U.S. Capitol on Monday matched the mood as the partial government shutdown drags on and the nation edges closer to a possible default.
J. Scott Applewhite AP

One thing is certain: None of the key players in the federal spending impasse is very happy right now.

President Obama is expected to meet with House Democrats on Wednesday and other caucuses in the coming days, The Associated Press reports, amid hope that a deal can be made soon.

Here's a rundown of Wednesday's Morning Edition coverage on the partial government shutdown, which is bumping up against the debate over raising the debt ceiling.

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7:17am

Wed October 9, 2013
The Two-Way

3 Scientists Win Chemistry Nobel For Complex Computer Modeling

Originally published on Wed October 9, 2013 12:34 pm

A screenshot of the Nobel Prizes webpage showing the 2013 chemistry laureates Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel.
Claudio Bresciani AP

Martin Karplus, Michael Levitt and Arieh Warshel have won the Nobel Prize in chemistry for their development of powerful computer models used to simulate how chemical reactions work, the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences announced Wednesday.

The technology they pioneered is now used to develop drugs and to perform other vital tasks in the laboratory.

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1:00pm

Tue October 8, 2013
The Two-Way

Study: U.S. Adults Below Average In Literacy, Basic Math

Originally published on Tue October 8, 2013 3:07 pm

Adults in the U.S. fall behind many of their developed-world counterparts in such basic areas as math, reading and problem-solving using technology, according to a newly released report authored by the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development.

The Program for the International Assessment of Adult Competencies surveyed 166,000 teens and adults ranging in age from 16 to 65 years old in 24 countries.

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11:09am

Tue October 8, 2013
The Two-Way

Higgs Boson Researchers Awarded The Nobel Prize In Physics

British theoretical physicist Peter Higgs (left) and Belgian theoretical physicist Francois Englert were awarded the Nobel Prize in physics on Tuesday.
Fabrice Coffrini AFP/Getty Images

Peter Higgs and Francois Englert have been jointly awarded the Nobel Prize in physics for their theory of how particles acquire mass, the Swedish committee announced Tuesday.

The prize was given "for the theoretical discovery of a mechanism that contributes to our understanding of the origin of mass of subatomic particles, and which recently was confirmed through the discovery of the predicted fundamental particle, by the ATLAS and CMS experiments at CERN's Large Hadron Collider."

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