Sam Sanders

Sam has worked at Vermont Public Radio since October 1978 in various capacities â

Political logos are hard. Very hard. There's usually always something in them to be not just dissected, but mocked, memed, and ridiculed.

Hillary Clinton was on the receiving end of such treatment when she unveiled her logo (that H with the red arrow facing right, of all directions).

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There are plenty of iconic trios — Larry, Curly and Mo. Robin, Maurice and Barry Gibb. Beyonce, Kelly and Michelle.

Add President Obama, Justin Trudeau and Enrique Peña Nieto to that list. This week at the North American Leaders Summit, the presidents of the U.S., Canada and Mexico became a full-fledged meme of beautiful, albeit awkward, proportions: the #3Amigos.

After last week's mass shooting that killed 49 people at Pulse, a gay nightclub in Orlando, politicians of all stripes have been speaking out about the LGBTQ community — arguing what should be done to protect them, speaking to the importance of their safe spaces, and pledging commitment to their needs. Presumptive GOP presidential nominee Donald Trump, per usual, seems to have made the most waves with his words.

Three days ahead of California's Democratic presidential primary, Bernie Sanders made several appearances in Southern California before headlining a rally in San Diego.

There was a Sunday morning walk through a farmers market in Downtown Los Angeles. There was a walk through West Hollywood, LA's gayborhood, with a pre-drag brunch address to diners at a hamburger joint on Santa Monica Boulevard. That was followed by a stroll through Santa Monica Pier, where the candidate rode a merry-go-round and even interrupted an outdoor spin class fundraiser to give an impromptu stump speech.

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Bernie Sanders continued to campaign in delegate-rich California on Monday, ahead of that state's Democratic presidential primary Tuesday, even after The Associated Press declared Hillary Clinton the presumptive Democratic nominee.

And even though the candidate refused to acknowledge the news in a Monday night outdoor rally and concert with the Golden Gate Bridge as backdrop, the entire night, something was a little off.

Walking up, you could hear people telling their friends, and themselves, that they knew Sanders was going to lose the nomination.

The gorilla, who was killed last Saturday at the Cincinnati Zoo to save a 3-year old child who fell into its enclosure, was named Harambe. The name comes from the word "Harambee," which, in Swahili, means, "Let us all pull together."

This week, the story of that gorilla, and how it strangely found its way into the political conversation, was about as un-Harambe as it gets. But that should not come as a surprise.

Queen Brown has told the story for years now, and it shows.

But it doesn't sound rehearsed. It sounds lived in, thought over, played on repeat over and over again. The story of her son, Eviton Elijah Brown, killed nine years ago, shot by a man Eviton didn't even know.

Eviton had been a student at Florida Agricultural and Mechanical University, or FAMU, before he was shot. He took some time off from school, to work after his girlfriend got pregnant. He was staying at home with his mother. One day, after a long double shift driving trucks, Eviton came home, exhausted.

We have reached the point in this campaign season where late-night talk show hosts negotiate presidential debates.

Why do you look so surprised? When you think about it, it kind of makes perfect sense.

Over the last two nights, Jimmy Kimmel, host of ABC's Jimmy Kimmel Live!, has seemingly been brokering a presidential debate between presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump and Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, who is still in the running against likely Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton.

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Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

If Donald Trump tweets an image of a taco bowl in the heart of a Trump Tower, but no one else is there to eat it, does it make a meme?

Yes. The answer is yes.

Let's call it Taco-Bowl-Gate. Or Cinco de No-No. Or "Donald's Gonna Donald."

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The Ted Cruz event in Indianapolis on Tuesday night — deemed an election night watch party — was set to begin at 7 p.m. ET, right about the time Cruz supporters found out their guy had lost Indiana by a whopping margin. But just about everyone stayed after the news got out. Because when you're a supporter, you're a supporter.

They thought that once Cruz took the stage, he'd rally the troops and declare, yet again, that he would take his floundering presidential campaign all the way to the Republican National Convention in July, hoping for a delegate miracle on a second ballot.

The White House Correspondent's Dinner-industrial complex has grown exponentially over time. Besides the dinner itself, the most high-profile annual social event in Washington, D.C., there are days of "nerd prom" events planned throughout the District — before and after the main event.

All the ramp-up parties hosted the week of, by the likes of Tinder and Google. The brunches on Saturday. The pre-parties on Saturday evening. The watch parties for those who can't get in. The after parties Saturday night all around the city. The day-after "hangover brunches" on Sunday.

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Two Black Lives Matter protesters took to the stage last August during a Bernie Sanders campaign rally in Seattle. As they moved closer and closer to Sanders' podium and mic, at times raising their fists to the crowd, Mara Jacqueline Willaford told Sanders to yield the mic to a fellow protester.

"If you do not listen to her," Willaford said to Sanders, "your event will be shut down right now."

On Wednesday, Treasury Secretary Jacob Lew announced that former slave and abolitionist Harriet Tubman would grace a new version of the $20 bill. The news came after a prolonged effort to get women's faces on U.S. currency, with Tubman's name mentioned for several months. On the surface, the Tubman 20 announcement could be seen as an overwhelmingly acceptable development. A feel good story. A chance to celebrate.

During an exchange over how high to raise the minimum wage in Thursday night's Democratic debate, Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders began to shout over each other, hands raised, fingers pointed, both seeming to get a bit red in the face, while the audience cheered and booed in equal parts.

It was quite a scene. As NPR's Ron Elving put it, "Both Sanders and Clinton showed flashes of animosity bordering on contempt."

Oregon Sen. Jeff Merkley has endorsed Bernie Sanders for president, the first of Sanders' fellow members of the U.S. Senate to do so.

In a New York Times op-ed, Merkley wrote that Sanders is "boldly and fiercely addressing the biggest challenges facing our country." Merkley praised the Vermont senator for opposition to international trade deals, his push for renewable energy, his calls to crack down on big banks, and his fight to address campaign finance laws.

The things they do for love.

Politicians will eat almost any food, adopt any colloquialism, endure any level of awkward — just to seem "authentic."

The latest example? Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton, riding the New York subway through the Bronx, saying hi to babies and taking selfies along the way.

Depending on your point of view, the event — and it was an event — could be viewed as either a shining testament to Clinton's New York bona fides, or just the latest example of how out of touch she is.

Here's how it all happened.

This post has been updated at 10 a.m. ET, April 8

In a prolonged exchange Thursday afternoon, former President Bill Clinton forcefully defended his 1994 crime bill to Black Lives Matter protesters in the crowd at a Hillary Clinton campaign event.

He said the bill lowered the country's crime rate, which benefited African-Americans, achieved bipartisan support, and diversified the police force. He then addressed a protester's sign, saying:

President Obama delivered a stern rebuke to the media, for their role in the 2016 campaign and, as he sees it, not holding candidates accountable for "unworkable plans."

On Sunday, after Bernie Sanders' commanding wins in the Alaska, Hawaii and Washington state Democratic presidential caucuses, Leslie Lee III, an American freelance writer living in Japan, tweeted, "I knew it. I knew if Bernie won Hawaii it would magically become a white state."

And then he tweeted again: "Ever since I voted for Bernie, I've been bingewatching Friends. #BernieMadeMeWhite."

Lee said he wrote that to contradict a narrative he sees playing out in the race for the Democratic nomination.

Shortly after this week's terror attacks in Brussels, American politicians and elected officials of all stripes issued statements and made comments. Many said they stand in solidarity with Belgium, that the country was in their thoughts and prayers. President Obama said America would do all it could to help bring the perpetrators to justice.

Former Florida Governor Jeb Bush has endorsed Texas Senator Ted Cruz for president. The news is the latest indication that the Republican Party establishment might finally view Cruz as a viable alternative to Donald Trump

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Transcript

MICHEL MARTIN, HOST:

How many Donald Trump jokes can be made in one night? Let the Gridiron Club count the ways.

The D.C. journalism and political establishments gathered on Saturday night to make fun of themselves and an increasingly unpredictable presidential campaign at the Gridiron Club and Foundation's 131st Anniversary Spring Dinner.

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Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

And here with me in the studio is Rachel Martin, who you're used to hearing on Sunday mornings.

RACHEL MARTIN, HOST:

Hi there.

SHAPIRO: So happy to have you here on Super Tuesday.

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