Richard Gonzales

Correspondent Richard Gonzales is based in San Francisco. His reports are featured regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines All Things Considered, Morning Edition, and Weekend Edition.

Gonzales describes his beat this way: "Willie Brown, Jerry Brown, medical pot, gay marriage, the U.S. Ninth Circuit, the California State Supreme Court, and any other legal, political, or social development occurring in Northern California the rest of the country should know about. California has the reputation for generating new ideas and trends and we try to keep track of them."

He began his California stint in September 1995, after spending a year studying the impact of international trade and information technology on the American political process as a John S. Knight Fellow at Stanford University.

Gonzales joined NPR in May 1986 when he covered the U.S. State Department during the Iran-Contra Affair and the fall of apartheid in South Africa. In August 1990, he assumed the post of White House Correspondent and reported on the prelude to the Gulf War and President George Bush's unsuccessful re-election bid. From 1993 through 1994, Gonzales covered the U.S. Congress, focusing on NAFTA and immigration and welfare reform.

In 1988 Gonzales received a World Hunger Media Award for "Street Children in Maputo." He was also honored by the World Affairs Council of Northern California in 1984 for his documentary on the war-ravaged Miskito Indians of Nicaragua.

Before joining NPR in May 1986, Gonzales was a freelance producer at KQED-TV/San Francisco. From 1979 to 1985, he was a reporter, producer, and later, public affairs director at station KPFA-FM/Berkeley.

Gonzales graduated from Harvard College in 1977 with a bachelor's degree in psychology and social relations. He is a co-founder of Familias Unidas, a bi-lingual social services program in his hometown of Richmond, California.

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4:00am

Fri June 10, 2011
Law

Jury Reaches Verdict In Calif. Journalist's Murder

A jury in California has convicted a Black Muslim leader in the murders of three men, including journalist Chauncey Bailey. The news paper editor was gunned down on his way to work four years ago. Bailey had been writing a story about the finances of Your Black Muslim Bakery in Oakland.

4:00am

Thu May 5, 2011
Law

Defense Rests In Trial Involving Journalist's Murder

In Oakland, California, the prosecution and defense have rested in the trial of a man accused of ordering the murder of a well-known journalist. Chauncey Bailey, an editor for a local community paper, was gunned down in August 2007. Prosecutors say Bailey was killed because he had run afoul of the leader of a local Black Muslim group.

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