Rhonda Miller

Rhonda Miller began as reporter and host for All Things Considered on WKU Public Radio in 2015.  She has worked as Gulf Coast reporter for Mississippi Public Broadcasting, where she won Associated Press, Edward R. Murrow and Green Eyeshade awards for stories on dead sea turtles, health and legal issues arising from the 2010 BP oil spill and homeless veterans.
 
She has worked at Rhode Island Public Radio,  as an intern at WVTF Public Radio in Roanoke, Virginia, and at the South Florida Sun-Sentinel and Pittsburgh Post-Gazette.
 
Rhonda’s freelance work called Writing Into Sound includes stories for Voice of America, WSHU Public Radio in Fairfield, Conn., NPR and AARP Prime Time Radio.
 
She has a master’s degree in media studies from Rhode Island College and a bachelor’s degree in journalism from Boston University.
 
Rhonda enjoys quiet water kayaking, riding her bicycle and folk music. She was a volunteer DJ for Root-N-Branch at WUMD community radio in Dartmouth, Mass.
 

Owensboro Municipal Utilities is switching to a different source of energy after more than 100 years of burning coal.

There’s a lot of talk - and hope - among some Kentucky residents that coal will make a comeback. But Owensboro Municipal Utilities says it’s seen the writing on the wall and coal will be completely phased over the next six years. 

Sonya Dixon is a spokeswoman for OMU.

“This is a monumental change in the way that OMU has done business. You know, we have burned coal for the last 117 years and obviously, this is a shift, but we feel it’s a positive one in the best interest of our customers.” 

The International Bluegrass Music Museum in Owensboro has received an extensive collection of bluegrass CDs, LPs, cassette tapes, books and recorded radio shows.

The thousands of items are from Colorado judge H. Conway Gandy, who died two years ago.

Gandy never lived in the Kentucky, but his passion for the state’s signature music led him to make it available to others. One way he shared his passion was through a radio show he created.

Savannah Hall is the curator at the bluegrass museum in Owensboro. She said the collection includes recordings of Gandy’s broadcasts about his beloved bluegrass music.

“His radio show ‘Where It All Began’ delved into the roots of bluegrass music and how bluegrass comes from a country background, a jazz background, blues. So the collection he gave us includes all of that music as well.”

Kentucky ranked 42nd in a new survey that looks at what makes a state a good place to live.

The survey by U.S. News & World Report considered factors such as health, education, opportunity, economy, infrastructure, crime and government.

  

The study weighted health care and education most heavily because that’s what survey respondents said they’re most concerned about. Kentucky ranked 44th in health care and 35th in education.

 

The state that earned the number one spot in the rankings is Massachusetts. At the bottom is Louisiana.

  

You can see all the details about how Kentucky and the other states rank in the complete survey.