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3:30am

Fri February 13, 2015
StoryCorps

Chapel Hill Shooting Victims Were 'Radiant,' Teacher Says

Originally published on Fri February 13, 2015 11:54 am

Yusor Abu-Salha was one of the victims in Tuesday's shooting in Chapel Hill, N.C. She sat down with her teacher, Mussarut Jabeen, at StoryCorps last May.
StoryCorps

Yusor Abu-Salha was one of the young students killed in Tuesday's shooting in Chapel Hill, N.C.

She and her former third-grade teacher, Mussarut Jabeen, spoke to StoryCorps in May. In fact, all three victims in the shooting โ€” Abu-Salha, 21, her husband, Deah Barakat, 23, and her sister, Razan Abu-Salha, 19 โ€” attended the Al-Iman School in Raleigh, N.C., where Jabeen taught.

Jabeen returned to StoryCorps Wednesday to talk about that 2014 conversation with Abu-Salha.

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2:44pm

Wed February 11, 2015
Author Interviews

Twice Kidnapped, Photographer Returns To War Zone: 'It's What I Do'

Originally published on Thu February 12, 2015 9:07 am

Lynsey Addario is a photojournalist who has worked in war zones for well over a decade.
Kursat Bayhan Courtesy of Penguin Press

In March 2011, photojournalist Lynsey Addario was kidnapped in Libya while covering the fighting between dictator Moammar Gadhafi's troops and rebel forces. She was with Anthony Shadid, Tyler Hicks and Stephen Farrell in the town of Ajdabiya, all on assignment for The New York Times.

Looking back, Addario says she had a premonition that something bad would happen.

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5:16pm

Mon February 9, 2015
All Tech Considered

Q&A: Sen. Ed Markey On Protecting Data Our Cars Are Sharing

Originally published on Mon February 9, 2015 6:27 pm

U.S. Sen. Edward Markey, D-Mass., says our cars are becoming increasingly vulnerable to hacking.
Alex Wong Getty Images

Cars and trucks today are computers, and a new report overseen by Sen. Ed Markey, D-Mass., comes with a warning: As more vehicles have wireless connections, the data stored in them is vulnerable to stealing, hacking and the same invasions faced by any technical system today.

How safe are we in our connected cars?

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6:57pm

Sun February 8, 2015
Around the Nation

To End Solitary Confinement, Rikers Steps Out Of The Box

Originally published on Mon February 9, 2015 1:09 pm

New York Mayor Bill de Blasio tours and meets with youth Dec. 17 at Second Chance Housing on Rikers Island in New York City. Second Chance Housing is an alternative for incarcerated adolescents, instead of punitive segregation, also known as solitary confinement.
Susan Watts Getty Images

New York's Rikers Island is the second-largest jail in the U.S., and one of the most notorious.

But with a single move, Rikers has taken the lead on prison reform on one issue: Last month, the prison banned the use of solitary confinement for inmates under 21 years old.

Amy Fettig, senior staff counsel for the ACLU's National Prison Project, says the use of isolation is too widespread and that it's being used for the wrong reasons. Often young people are even isolated for their own protection.

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6:40pm

Sun February 8, 2015
Code Switch

Korean Dictator, All-American Dad: One Actor's 'Very Unique Year'

Originally published on Mon February 9, 2015 9:53 am

Randall Park and Constance Wu co-star as husband and wife Louis and Jessica Huang in Fresh Off the Boat.
Gilles Mingasson ABC

When Randall Park realized just how big a deal Fresh Off The Boat was going to be, he got cold feet. The stakes were high for the first network sitcom in 20 years to feature an Asian-American family.

But he'd already filmed the pilot, in which he starred as family patriarch Louis Huang, a Taiwanese immigrant and firm believer in the American Dream. (The sitcom, which centers on Louis' son Eddie, begins as Louis uproots his young family from Washington, D.C., to suburban Orlando to open a steakhouse.)

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5:56pm

Sun February 8, 2015
Code Switch

100 Years Later, What's The Legacy Of 'Birth Of A Nation'?

Originally published on Thu February 19, 2015 7:56 pm

Actors dressed in full Ku Klux Klan regalia for scenes in 1915's The Birth of a Nation.
Hulton Archive/ Getty Images

One hundred years ago Sunday, the nascent film industry premiered what would go on to be its first blockbuster: The Birth of a Nation.

As the house lights dimmed and the orchestra struck up the score, a message from director D.W. Griffith flickered on the screen: "This is an historical presentation of the Civil War and Reconstruction Period, and is not meant to reflect on any race or people of today."

But its effects on race relations were devastating, and reverberations are still felt to this day.

Epic Film, Embedded Bigotry

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5:35pm

Sun February 8, 2015
Music Interviews

Bird Of A Feather: Rudresh Mahanthappa On Learning From Charlie Parker

Originally published on Mon February 9, 2015 9:53 am

Rudresh Mahanthappa's latest album is Bird Calls.
Jimmy Katz Courtesy of the artist

In the early 1980s, when a young sixth-grader in Colorado first heard Charlie Parker, his life was transformed. Now a world-class saxophonist, Rudresh Mahanthappa is paying homage to Parker with his new album, Bird Calls. Mahanthappa says it's a tribute to Charlie Parker โ€” but there are no Charlie Parker songs here.

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10:12am

Sun February 8, 2015
Law

Next Witness: Will The Yellow Smiley Face Take The Stand?

Originally published on Wed February 11, 2015 2:21 pm

Are these jokers ready to appear in court?
iStockphoto.com

Emojis can be a lot of fun. Little pictures on our phones seem to express sentiments when words just fall short. Sometimes we need to punctuate our sentences with a sad cat, floating hearts, maybe an alien head.

They aren't complicated when they appear in our personal email or texts, but emojis are now popping up in a place where their meanings are closely scrutinized: courtrooms.

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6:56pm

Sat February 7, 2015
My Big Break

From Touchdowns To Takeoff: Engineer-Athlete Soared To Space

Originally published on Sat February 7, 2015 9:29 pm

Leland Melvin with his dogs, Jake and Scout. "I snuck them into NASA to get this picture," Melvin says.
Courtesy of Leland Melvin

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

You may recognize retired astronaut Leland Melvin from his famous 2009 NASA portrait with his two dogs, Jake and Scout. Or maybe you've seen him on the Lifetime channel hosting Child Genius.

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6:23pm

Sat February 7, 2015
Fine Art

'War Rugs' Reflect Afghanistan's Long History With Conflict

Originally published on Sat February 7, 2015 9:29 pm

Afghan war rugs reflect the nation's long history of conflict through one of its most ancient art forms.
Courtesy of Kevin Sudeith

Afghanistan has suffered through long decades of war; conflict with the Soviet Union, civil war and 13 years of a U.S.-led NATO combat mission. Among the political, economic and cultural impacts of this violence, there's an artistic transformation: the history of violence is reflected in the country's ancient art of rug making.

Kevin Sudeith, a collector, tells NPR's Arun Rath that he has long been impressed by the craftsmanship of Afghan rugs.

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5:37pm

Sat February 7, 2015
Author Interviews

We Went From Hunter-Gatherers To Space Explorers, But Are We Happier?

Originally published on Sat February 7, 2015 9:29 pm

Until about 30,000 years ago โ€” around the same time these animals were drawn on the walls of France's Chauvet Cave โ€” there were at least five other species of humans on the planet.
Jeff Pachoud AFP/Getty Images

In his book, Sapiens: A Brief History of Humankind, scientist Yuval Noah Harari attempts a seemingly impossible task โ€” packing the entirety of human history into 400 pages.

Harari, an Israeli historian, is interested in tackling big-picture questions and puncturing some of our dearly held beliefs about human progress.

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11:19am

Sat February 7, 2015
Author Interviews

An Expansive View Of Vietnam In 'She Weeps Each Time You're Born'

Originally published on Sat February 7, 2015 11:44 am

A woman named Rabbit is a kind of miracle: She was pulled out of her dead mother's grave beside the Ma River in Vietnam, on the night of a full moon โ€” when folklore says that a rabbit walks the moon. Rabbit is the center of poet and author Quan Barry's new novel, She Weeps Each Time You're Born.

The Vietnam War is raging; American troops have just begun to pull out, and Rabbit grows up in a landscape of leveled homes, shattered lives, and barren, poisoned fields, her life slipping between present tense and parable.

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5:23pm

Fri February 6, 2015
Theater

Much To His Chagrin, On Broadway Larry David Has To 'Wait And Talk'

Originally published on Sat February 7, 2015 2:24 pm

Larry David hasn't been in a play since the eighth grade, but he's written and stars in a new comedy called Fish in the Dark, directed by Anna D. Shapiro. "I didn't think it was going to get any laughs at all," he says. "The first time we did it, like every laugh was a surprise to me because I was expecting nothing."
Joan Marcus Courtesy of Philip Renaldi Publicity

These days, when Larry David leaves work at the stage door of the Cort Theater, fans are lined up for his autograph. At age 67, David is now a Broadway star โ€” and that's new, scary territory for him.

David was co-creator of the TV sitcom Seinfeld and starred as himself โ€” a cantankerous guy who says exactly what's on his mind โ€” in the raucously funny HBO series Curb Your Enthusiasm. He hasn't been in a play since he was in eighth grade, but now he's written one called Fish in the Dark, and it's his name in lights.

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6:23pm

Thu February 5, 2015
Parallels

In 'Red Notice,' Success Draws Treachery, Tragedy In Putin's Russia

Originally published on Fri March 13, 2015 11:48 am

Bill Browder crosses Red Square in 2004, at the height of Hermitage Capital Management's success.
James Hill Courtesy of the Browder Family Archives

William Browder's new book, Red Notice, is named for the type of warrant the Russian government has sought from Interpol in hopes of capturing him.

The hedge fund manager made huge profits with Hermitage Capital Management, a company he started in Russia in 1996. That, he says, drew the attention and machinations of a corrupt group of Russian officials.

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4:03am

Thu February 5, 2015
Around the Nation

Stuck In Traffic? It's Likely To Be Worse In 30 Years, Report Says

Originally published on Thu February 5, 2015 1:27 pm

Traffic clogs the 101 Freeway in Los Angeles.
Mark Ralston AFP/Getty Images

Moving from crisis to crisis โ€” for too long that's been America's strategy for dealing with the challenges of an aging transit infrastructure, from roads to bridges to ports. The result is a system that's crumbling and in desperate need of attention, according to a new report from the U.S. Department of Transportation. The massive study both looks at the current state of the country's transportation systems and forecasts the challenges that lie ahead.

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5:40pm

Sun February 1, 2015
Around the Nation

To Save 2 Cows, All It Took Was A Good Icebreaker

Originally published on Mon February 2, 2015 8:26 am

A cow walks away from an icy pond after firefighters rescued it and one other cow that had fallen through the ice.
Darin Anstine AP

The Fountain, Colo., Fire Department handles a lot of animal rescue calls. But in 11 years with the department, Fire Captain Rick Daniels says the call he got on Jan. 26 was "one of the more challenging animal rescue calls that I've had."

No one's exactly sure how or why, Daniels tells NPR, but two brown cows had wandered out over a frozen pond, and fallen through the half-foot of ice.

Someone driving by the pond called 911 and described seeing just the heads of two cows peeking out over the sheet of ice. The cows were up to their necks in frigid water.

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5:40pm

Sun February 1, 2015
My Big Break

From The Ivy League To 'The X-Files': David Duchovny's Big Break

Originally published on Mon February 2, 2015 11:30 am

David Duchovny says The X-Files was his biggest break โ€” not because it was successful but because that's where he went from youthful ambition to an adult understanding of what it means to work.
Getty Images

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Here's something you probably know about David Duchovny: He played one of the 1990s' most iconic roles, FBI agent Fox Mulder in The X-Files.

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11:24am

Sun February 1, 2015
Environment

The Ice Is Talking. We Just Have To Listen

Originally published on Thu February 12, 2015 8:14 am

Giant chunks of ice break away from the Hans Glacier in Svalbard, Norway, in 2013.
Courtesy Oskar Glowacki

If a glacier cracks and nobody hears it, does it still make a sound?

"Oh, they moan and they groan," says Grant Deane, a researcher at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography. "They crackle and rumble and fizz, and they have all kinds of amazing sounds that they make."

Deane is one of the authors of a new study that interprets the acoustics of glacial melting.

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7:56am

Sun February 1, 2015
Shots - Health News

Family Struggles With Father's Wish To Die

Originally published on Mon February 2, 2015 1:36 pm

Robert Schwimmer, 66, and his son Scott Schwimmer, 21, spoke with NPR about Robert's wish to hasten his death under certain circumstances. Here โ€” as in the family photo above โ€” they're in Kauai, Hawaii, on the family's "last big trip" after Robert received a 6-month prognosis in October.
Courtesy Scott Schwimmer

When 66-year-old Robert Schwimmer was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2013, he didn't take it all that seriously. His doctors told him it was "operable," and that was the only word he seemed to hear.

Now he's in hospice care and, as he tells NPR's Rachel Martin, he accepts that he's no longer trying to prolong life, but rather living out what's left of it.

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5:52am

Sun February 1, 2015
Education

A Crossroads At The End Of College: Introducing 'The Howard Project'

Originally published on Sat February 21, 2015 7:35 pm

Howard University students (left to right) Kevin Peterman, Taylor Davis, Leighton Watson and Ariel Alford are the subjects of NPR's Project Howard. They'll be keeping audio diaries as they finish their final semester of college and look toward their futures.
Robb Hill for NPR

If you know any college seniors, now might be a good time to send them some encouraging words. The class of 2015 can't be blamed if they're feeling a little worried: They're facing one of the most important transitions of their lives.

In a matter of months, they're about to launch from the relatively protected confines of college into the so-called "real world," where they have to find a sense of purpose โ€” not to mention a paycheck. It's not hyperbole to say the decisions they make now will shape the rest of their lives.

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6:30pm

Sat January 31, 2015
Author Interviews

Impressions From The Ice: A Poet Returns From Antarctica

Last year, a poet arrived at the end of the earth: Jynne Dilling Martin spent six weeks, funded by the National Science Foundation, living in Antarctica.

She spent the summer (winter, to those of us in the Northern Hemisphere) shadowing scientists as they went about their work, and writing about the people who call the icy continent home.

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11:41am

Sat January 31, 2015
Middle East

Four Years After Revolution, Libya Slides Into Chaos

Originally published on Mon February 2, 2015 3:55 pm

Bullet holes from recent clashes riddle an apartment building in Tripoli.
Bilal Hussein AP

There was hope in Libya and around the world for Libya after Moammar Gadhafi was overthrown four years ago.

But today, Libya is a country torn apart. There are now two competing governments, in different cities with their own parliaments and their own military.

A traveler first needs a visa from one government to land in Tripoli, then a so-called "landing permission" to fly east to the other government's territory โ€” and has to hopscotch around jihadist-controlled areas along the way.

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5:33am

Sat January 31, 2015
Goats and Soda

A Former Child Soldier Finds Escape, Heaven Through His Music

Originally published on Sat January 31, 2015 2:11 pm

"Through music," says former child soldier Emmanuel Jal, "I was able to become a child again."
Courtesy of Gatwitch

Emmanuel Jal was only 8 when he was dragged into Sudan's long civil war. Like 12,000 other children, he was recruited as a soldier, fighting and killing alongside South Sudanese armed groups.

Only a few, like Jal, have managed to escape.

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6:16pm

Thu January 29, 2015
Author Interviews

The Gift Of Eternal Shelf Life: 'Tuck Everlasting' Turns 40

Originally published on Fri May 1, 2015 2:53 pm

What if you could drink the elixir of life โ€” sip from a magical spring that would make you live forever? Would you do it? That's the question at the heart of Natalie Babbitt's Tuck Everlasting, a celebrated book for young readers that's marking its 40th anniversary this year.

In the book, 10-year-old Winnie Foster stumbles upon a secret spring and the family the spring has given eternal life to. The father, Angus Tuck, takes Winnie out in a rowboat to explain how unnatural it is to live forever; how the great wheel of life has to turn:

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6:00pm

Wed January 28, 2015
Book News & Features

'Little House,' Big Demand: Never Underestimate Laura Ingalls Wilder

Originally published on Thu January 29, 2015 8:35 am

Laura Ingalls Wilder entertained generations of children with her Little House series, which was loosely based on her family's pioneering life. Her memoir, Pioneer Girl, was published in 2014.
South Dakota State Historical Society

In 2014, the South Dakota State Historical Society published the annotated autobiography of Laura Ingalls Wilder, author of the Little House books. Her memoir, titled Pioneer Girl, sold like hotcakes. The initial print run of 15,000 was snapped up in just a few weeks. So was an additional run of 15,000 more copies. Now, the historical society is waiting on a third run of 45,000 books โ€” enough to fill current demand and have some leftovers.

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4:34pm

Tue January 27, 2015
Parallels

After Father's Death, A Writer Learns How 'The Japanese Say Goodbye'

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 6:30 pm

Marie Mutsuki Mockett says the Japanese tradition of Tลrล nagashi โ€” lighting floating paper lanterns in honor of loved ones โ€” reminded her that she was not alone in her grief.
Alberto Carrasco Casado Flickr

Several years ago, when her father died unexpectedly, writer Marie Mutsuki Mockett became unmoored. Lost in a deep depression, Mockett turned to Japan's rituals of mourning for a way forward.

Mockett's mother's family owns and runs a temple just 25 miles from the Fukushima nuclear power plant. The plant melted down after the 2011 earthquake and tsunami. Mockett begged her cousin, the temple's priest, to leave, but he refused โ€” he said he needed to stay to care for the souls of the ancestors.

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3:39am

Tue January 27, 2015
Movies

'Stronger Than Ever' Sundance Docs Tackle Scientology, Campus Rape

Originally published on Tue January 27, 2015 11:27 am

Alex Gibney's Going Clear is based on a book by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Lawrence Wright.
Sam Painter Courtesy of Sundance Institute

Over in Park City, Utah, the Sundance Film Festival is in full swing. Critic Kenneth Turan tells NPR's Renee Montagne about some of the festival's must-see films, including documentaries about Scientology, rape on college campuses and Nina Simone, and a romantic drama based on a novel by Colm Tรณibรญn.


Interview Highlights

On the festival's stand-out documentaries

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5:32pm

Sun January 25, 2015
Code Switch

Black Doll Show Inspires With Wakandan Heroes And Jazz Superstars

Originally published on Sun January 25, 2015 6:38 pm

For the past 34 years, the William Grant Still Arts Center has held a Black Doll Show to showcase diverse dolls for children. The exhibit features dolls submitted by artists and collectors from around the country.
Priska Neely NPR

At The William Grant Still Arts Center in the West Adams neighborhood in Los Angeles, jazz superstars and comic book superheroes are gathered together โ€” in miniature, as part of the Black Doll Show.

For the past 34 years, the center has held a doll show to showcase diverse dolls for children. The exhibit features dolls submitted by artists and collectors from around the country. This year's theme is A League Supreme: Jazz Superheroes.

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5:24pm

Sun January 25, 2015
My Big Break

How'd A Cartoonist Sell His First Drawing? It Only Took 610 Tries

Originally published on Mon January 26, 2015 9:43 am

After moving back home, Tom Toro didn't know what to do with his life. But a stack of magazines at a used book sale gave him an idea. "There they were," Toro says. "Cartoons in among the articles."
Courtesy of Tom Toro

As part of a series called "My Big Break," All Things Considered is collecting stories of triumph, big and small. These are the moments when everything seems to click, and people leap forward into their careers.

Tom Toro didn't always dream of becoming a cartoonist at The New Yorker. Sure, he drew cartoons in college, but he didn't see that as a career path. Instead, he went to film school at NYU.

Then he came to the sudden realization that he was in the wrong field โ€” and he had no idea what he was going to do.

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6:14pm

Sat January 24, 2015
Research News

Study Says Creativity Can Flow From Political Correctness

As the U.S. workforce continues to become more diverse, researchers are now more than ever examining diversity and bias in the work place.
iStockphoto

There is a common belief that requiring the use of "politically correct" language in the workplace stifles creativity.

Michelle Duguid, a professor at Washington University in St. Louis, tells NPR's Arun Rath that, intuitively, that assumption makes sense.

"People should be able to freely think, throw any crazy ideas, and any constraint would actually dampen creativity," Duguid says.

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