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5:07am

Thu July 30, 2015
Around the Nation

#TheEmptyChair Amplifies Conversation About Sexual Assault

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 2:29 pm

This week's New York magazine cover has received a lot of attention.
New York Magazine Via Twitter

The cover story of this week's New York magazine is getting a lot of attention.

It features 35 women seated in chairs and one empty chair. The women are all dressed in black, looking straight ahead with both hands resting on their knees. It is a stark image, and all the more compelling because each of them is openly and by name accusing Bill Cosby of horrendous acts. Some say they were drugged and raped; others recount stories of narrowly escaping sexual assault.

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5:07am

Thu July 30, 2015
Music Interviews

Through Doubt And Dark Times, Joss Stone Lets Her Voice Light The Way

Originally published on Thu July 30, 2015 8:20 am

Joss Stone's new album, Water For Your Soul, is out July 31.
Courtesy of the artist

Joss Stone's voice first stunned listeners more than a decade ago. The British singer was only 14 years old then, but her booming, soulful voice got noticed, as did her knack for taking success in stride. At age 28, she hasn't stopped: Stone's newest album, Water for Your Soul, comes out this Friday.

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6:42pm

Tue July 28, 2015
Parallels

Investigation Underway Into Killing Of Cecil, Zimbabwe's Best Known Lion

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 3:12 pm

Cecil the lion is shown walking in Zimbabwe's Hwange National Park in a YouTube video from July 9, 2015. Credit: Bryan Orford
Bryan Orford YouTube

Conservationists are lamenting the hunting and killing of a well-known lion from western Zimbabwe's Hwange National Park.

The black-maned lion, named Cecil, was 13 years old and had become popular among tourists from around the world.

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6:04pm

Tue July 28, 2015
The Salt

Oceans Called A 'Wild West' Where Lawlessness And Impunity Rule

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 12:19 am

There are about 140 million square miles of open ocean, and according to New York Times reporter Ian Urbina, much of it is essentially lawless. As Mark Young, a retired U.S. Coast Guard commander and former chief of enforcement for the Pacific Ocean, told Urbina, the maritime realm is "like the Wild West. Weak rules, few sheriffs, lots of outlaws."

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6:40pm

Mon July 27, 2015
All Tech Considered

Narcissistic, Maybe. But Is There More To The Art Of The Selfie?

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 11:09 am

To selfie, or not to selfie?
iStockphoto

The smartphone has given us a whole new genre of cultural expression: the selfie.

If you're into selfies, it's safe to say you've probably taken one, and maybe wished you didn't have those dark circles under your eyes.

Now there are plenty of apps out there to fix that.

But whether you think your selfies can be elevated to art may depend on how much effort you are willing to put into them.

A Personal Brand Boost

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6:11pm

Sun July 26, 2015
Latin America

A Day Of Triumph In A Time Of Change: Cuba's High Holiday Explained

Originally published on Sun July 26, 2015 11:23 pm

Cubans gather in Santiago de Cuba to celebrate this year's Revolution Day, the 62nd anniversary of Fidel Castro's first open assault on the forces of President Fulgencio Batista, who would eventually be overthrown by the rebels.
Yamil Lage AFP/Getty Images

On this day 62 years ago, Fidel Castro launched the attack that marked the start of the Cuban revolution. In the years since, the day has taken on emotional significance for the Cuban people — and for the communist government that celebrates it annually.

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5:13pm

Sun July 26, 2015
Global Health

Transgender Women Face Inadequate Health Care, 'Shocking' HIV Rates

Originally published on Sun July 26, 2015 11:27 pm

Transgender performers walk backstage during an event to mark World AIDS Day in 2013. A new WHO report demonstrates extremely rates of HIV infection among transgender women in 15 countries.
Prakash Mathema AFP/Getty Images

Transgender people are not getting adequate health care, and widespread discrimination is largely to blame, according to a recent World Health Organization report. And the story is told most starkly in the high rates of HIV among transgender women worldwide.

JoAnne Keatley, one of the authors of that study, puts it plainly.

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7:48am

Sat July 25, 2015
Race

A Navajo Speaker Says The Language Connects Her With Her Culture

Originally published on Sat July 25, 2015 10:55 am

Supporters of Navajo presidential candidate Chris Deschene were unhappy last October when a court determined that he did not meet the language requirement.
Felicia Fonseca AP

Should the president of the Navajo Nation be required to speak fluent Navajo?

The Navajo Nation held a referendum on that question this week, and the majority voted no.

The vote was victory for supporters of a Navajo presidential candidate who was disqualified last fall because he didn't speak the language fluently. The next Navajo Nation election is in 2018.

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5:27am

Sat July 25, 2015
Animals

When Detecting Land Mines, The Nose Knows — Or, In This Case, The Trunk

Originally published on Sat July 25, 2015 11:41 am

An elephant in South African offers an up-close glimpse of its prodigious instrument. According to Sean Hensman of Adventures with Elephants, trunks like this one could help the U.S. Army develop a better landmine sensor.
Greatstock/Barcroft Media Barcroft Media/Landov

In Angola, a civil war that raged for decades has left lingering, and dangerous, reminders of the violence across the countryside. Long since the worst of the fighting ended in 2002, land mines continue to claim lives — and not just those of humans.

Even as the elephant population there saw a replenishment in numbers following the war, many of the mammoth animals were being killed by leftover land mines, as well.

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6:16pm

Mon July 20, 2015
All Tech Considered

With Ad Blocking Use On The Rise, What Happens To Online Publishers?

Originally published on Tue July 21, 2015 1:56 pm

The rise of ad blockers threatens the business model that drives much of the Internet economy.
Danae Munoz Ikon Images/Getty Images

Advertising is the basic business model of the Internet. It's one reason we can view online content free of charge.

Millions of Web surfers already download software to block ads online, and that number is growing. Soon, Apple could be making mobile ad blocking easier.

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6:28pm

Sun July 19, 2015
Animals

PETA Says Undercover SeaWorld Employee Posed As Animal Rights Activist

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 11:31 am

During the 2014 Tournament of Roses Parade, SeaWorld's float was accompanied by police in Pasadena, Calif. PETA supporters were arrested for protesting the float that day, and PETA claims that a SeaWorld employee posing as a PETA volunteer tipped police off to the protest.
Ringo H.W. Chiu AP

In recent years, People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals has waged a protest campaign against SeaWorld, saying that the U.S. theme parks' treatment of trained orcas is cruel. Now, PETA says it has identified a SeaWorld "agent" in its midst.

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6:33pm

Sat July 18, 2015
Environment

Birds, Bees And The Power Of Sex Appeal: The Ribald Lives Of Flowers

Stephen Buchmann Scribner

Flowers, bugs and bees: Stephen Buchmann wanted to study them all when he was a kid.

"I never grew out of my bug-and-dinosaur phase," he tells NPR's Arun Rath. "You know, since about the third grade, I decided I wanted to chase insects, especially bees."

These days, he's living that dream. As a pollination ecologist, he's now taking a particular interest in how flowers attract insects. In his new book, The Reason for Flowers, he looks at more than just the biology of flowers — he dives into the ways they've laid down roots in human history and culture, too.

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5:10pm

Sat July 18, 2015
Education

They're No. 1: U.S. Wins Math Olympiad For First Time In 21 Years

Originally published on Mon July 20, 2015 1:26 pm

Head coach Po-Shen Loh (far left) and assistant coaches John Berman and Alex Zhai (far right) flank the members of the winning squad: Shyam Narayanan, David Stoner, Michael Kural, Ryan Alweiss, Yang Liu and Allen Liu.
Courtesy of Po-Shen Loh

In one of this year's most intense international competitions, the United States has come out as best in the world — and this time, we're not talking about soccer.

This week, the top-ranked math students from high schools around the country went head-to-head with competitors from more than 100 countries at the International Mathematical Olympiad in Chiang Mai, Thailand. And, for the first time in more than two decades, they won.

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5:10pm

Sat July 18, 2015
World

In Northern Ireland, 'Terror Gets Old,' But Divisions Linger

Originally published on Sat July 18, 2015 9:00 pm

Courtesy of Corinne Purtill and Mark Oltmanns

In Northern Ireland, "the Troubles" — the long and bloody conflict between Catholic Irish nationalists and pro-British Protestants — formally came to an end with a peace agreement in 1998.

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5:10pm

Sat July 18, 2015
Music Interviews

Leaving Los Angeles: Rickie Lee Jones Turns A Decade Into An Album

Originally published on Wed July 22, 2015 2:51 pm

The new album The Other Side of Desire marks Jones' first original material in years, spurred on by a life-changing move to New Orleans.
David McClister Courtesy of the artist

If you turned on a radio in 1979, there was very good chance you'd hear the music of Rickie Lee Jones. At only 24, she leapt onto the world stage with her big single "Chuck E.'s in Love." Rolling Stone called her "the dutchess of coolsville."

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9:04am

Sat July 18, 2015
Middle East

Former Hostage: Under Deal, Iran Has Less Incentive To Hold Americans

Originally published on Sat July 18, 2015 10:33 am

Shourd and fellow hikers Shane Bauer (center) and Josh Fattal held a press conference shortly after Bauer and Fattal were released in 2011. Shourd was released in 2010.
Craig Ruttle AP

President Obama responded sharply this week when a reporter asked if he was "content" to celebrate the nuclear deal with Iran when at least three and possibly four Americans are being held in Iranian jails.

"Nobody's content," he said, "and our diplomats and our teams are working diligently to try to get them out."

At least one former American hostage thinks the deal is worth signing, despite the remaining hostages.

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5:36am

Fri July 17, 2015
Environment

Reduce, Reuse, Remove The Cellophane: Recycling Demystified

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 10:29 am

Workers pull out plastic and trash from a conveyor belt of paper at a recycling plant in Elkridge, Md. The plant processes 1,000 tons of recyclable materials every day.
Dianna Douglas NPR

It's easy to think we're being virtuous when we fill up the blue recycling bin and put it on the curb. But it's clear we have embraced some magical thinking when it comes to what can be recycled.

Morning Edition asked its social media followers to share what puzzles them the most about the recycling process. Then, NPR's Dianna Douglas visited a waste management plant in Elkridge, Md., to get the answers from Michael Taylor, director of recycling operations for the plant.

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8:41am

Thu July 16, 2015
Parallels

The View From Inside Syria

Originally published on Thu July 16, 2015 3:46 pm

Saeed al-Batal, a Syrian photographer, posted this image from Douma, Syria, on his Facebook page on March 31.
Courtesy of Saeed al-Batal

Syria's civil war has created the worst refugee crisis in the world, with more than 4 million people fleeing the country. Millions more have been displaced inside Syria, though we rarely hear from them.

Over the past year, NPR's Morning Edition has spoken three times with Saeed al-Batal, a photographer and filmmaker who doesn't use his real name for security reasons.

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6:59pm

Wed July 15, 2015
It's All Politics

Logo Or No Go? When Campaign Logos Look A Little Too Familiar

Originally published on Wed July 15, 2015 8:01 pm

@CNNPolitics tweeted a combination of Scott Walker's campaign logo with America's Best Eyeglasses logo to show the design similarities.
Via @CNNPolitics/Twitter

The "E" in Wisconsin Gov. Scott Walker's newly unveiled presidential logo is a stylized American flag — as it turns out, one that looks remarkably similar to the logo for America's Best Contacts & Eyeglasses.

The company's CEO, Reade Fahs, said he doesn't mind but also that it's unlikely the governor hasn't seen the 18-year-old logo. "It's on hundreds of stores across the country. So assuming he's got good vision, he probably would have spotted it in his campaign travels. And we have lots of stores in Wisconsin too."

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3:49pm

Mon July 13, 2015
All Tech Considered

#RaceOnTech: How An Early Love Of Math Led Her To The Role Of CEO

Originally published on Fri July 17, 2015 10:03 am

Dr. Lisa Dyson is the CEO of Kiverdi, a next-generation sustainable oil company that converts CO2 and waste carbon gases into oils using biotechnology.
Maurice Dean Courtesy of Lisa Dyson

5:11pm

Sat July 11, 2015
Race

He's Shared 'Every Single Word' — But It's The Silence That Rings Louder

Originally published on Sun July 12, 2015 10:34 am

YouTube

7:45am

Sat July 11, 2015
Animals

For This Tarantula-Killing Wasp, Dinner's A Meal Best Served Living

Originally published on Sat July 11, 2015 10:38 am

Meal time for one species probably means sleepless nights for others.
Debbie Hall Flickr

It's been wet in Texas this year — exceptionally wet, as a matter of fact. With record amounts of rain, Texas is more than a little hot, green and rife with happy insects.

Take the tarantula hawk, for example. In case you've never heard of it, it's a wasp that's so big, and so nasty, that it attacks tarantulas — who happen to be quite big and nasty themselves.

So, what does a happy tarantula hawk look like? Ben Hutchins, an invertebrate biologist with the Texas Parks and Wildlife Department, takes NPR's Wade Goodwyn through all the gruesome wasp-on-tarantula details.

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3:50am

Fri July 10, 2015
Code Switch

Ta-Nehisi Coates Looks At The Physical Toll Of Being Black In America

Originally published on Fri July 10, 2015 3:12 pm

Coates with his son Samori.
Random House

When writer Ta-Nehisi Coates sat down at NPR's New York studios a few days ago, he got a little emotional.

It was the first time that Coates, who writes for The Atlantic, had held a copy of his latest book, Between the World and Me.

This book is personal, written as a letter to his teenage son Samori. In it, we see glimpses of the hard West Baltimore streets where Coates grew up, his curiosity at work on the campus of Howard University and his early struggles as a journalist.

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4:26am

Thu July 9, 2015
Goats and Soda

He Fled Sudan And Made A New Life In The U.S. So Why Go Back?

Originally published on Thu July 9, 2015 10:22 am

Daniel Majok Gai revisits the two-bedroom apartment in Denver where he lived with seven other Sudanese refugees in 2001.
Kevin Leahy NPR

Daniel Majok Gai wants to go back to South Sudan.

He thinks he can help his homeland — the youngest nation in the world. Today marks the fourth anniversary of its independence. But there's little celebration. The country is being ripped apart by civil war.

Yet Gai, who suffered through years of violence and pain as a refugee, believes he can play a role in moving South Sudan toward peace and safety.

Against all odds, the 34-year-old is an incredible optimist.

He was 6 when a militia attacked his village.

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6:29pm

Sun July 5, 2015
History

Is It All Greek To You? Thank Medieval Monks, And The Bard, For The Phrase

Originally published on Sun July 5, 2015 10:11 pm

Greek flags fly beside those of the European Union in Athens. Many people chalk the phrase up to Shakespeare, but its origins likely date back much earlier than that --€” to medieval monks eager for a cop-out.
Matt Cardy Getty Images

If you've been following the Greek financial crisis, you've certainly seen this old cliche in the headlines.

In USA Today, there was "If 'it's all Greek to you,' here's the skinny on debt crisis." The BBC says, "All Greek to you? Greece's debt jargon explained."

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6:08pm

Sun July 5, 2015
Author Interviews

From Early Failures To New 'Trainwreck,' Judd Apatow Gets Serious

Originally published on Sun July 5, 2015 10:11 pm

Director, writer and producer Judd Apatow has both a new memoir and a new movie right now. Trainwreck, which he directed, is in theaters starting July 17 and Sick in the Head was published in June.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

It's a bit of an understatement to call Judd Apatow busy.

His new book, Sick in the Head, a 500-page collection of Apatow's conversations with some of the greatest minds in comedy, is on the New York Times best-seller list. Meanwhile, his film collaboration with the white-hot Amy Schumer, Trainwreck — his fifth movie as a director — is set for release within two weeks.

Oh, and he just wrapped up shooting another movie that's due out next year.

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9:40am

Sat July 4, 2015
Author Interviews

An Outsider In Buenos Aires Goes Incognito, For Love Of Tango

Originally published on Mon July 6, 2015 3:52 pm

Lydia Thompson NPR

In the dirty, crowded, and impoverished immigrant barrios of Buenos Aires of 1913, a 17-year-old girl arrives with little more than some clothes and her grandfather's violin.

Her name is Leda, and she's the character at the heart of Carolina De Robertis' third novel, The Gods of Tango.

Leda, an Italian girl, was sent for by her cousin-husband, but widowed before her ship even lands in South America. She soon finds comfort and excitement in a new kind of music that's filling the city's courtyards, bars and brothels: the tango.

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12:13pm

Wed July 1, 2015
It's All Politics

Can The Candidate Move Beyond 'The Christie Show'?

Originally published on Thu July 2, 2015 7:06 am

A supporter at Gov. Chris Christie's announcement Tuesday.
Getty Images

It was the least suspenseful cliffhanger in the history of cliffs.

Governor Christie has, essentially, been running for higher office for years. But as of Tuesday he is now, officially, a presidential candidate.

This week the Christie Tracker podcast, from WNYC and New Jersey Public Radio, headed to Livingston High School for analysis on the announcement.

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6:48pm

Sun June 28, 2015
Music Interviews

The Sound Of Twin Danger: Frank Sinatra Meets The Clash

Twin Danger's Vanessa Bley and Stuart Matthewman
Sunny Khalsa Courtesy of the artist

Cocktail jazz isn't a sound you hear very much in pop music these days. But a duo known as Twin Danger is causing a scene with their self-titled debut album and live shows.

It's a familiar mood for saxophonist Stuart Matthewman; he co-wrote many of the biggest hits for Sade, like "No Ordinary Love" and "Your Love Is King."

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5:36pm

Sat June 27, 2015
Governing

For Families Of U.S. Hostages, New Policy May Bring New Hope

Originally published on Sat June 27, 2015 6:36 pm

Linda Boyle (left) and Lyn Coleman hold a photo of their children, who were kidnapped in Afghanistan in 2012. Caitlan Coleman, an American married to Canadian Joshua Boyle, was pregnant when the couple was abducted.
Bill Gorman AP

More than 80 Americans have been taken hostage abroad since Sept. 11, 2001. Currently, 30 Americans are being held around the world.

Until this week, the families of those hostages would have faced the threat of prosecution from the U.S. government for trying to pay a ransom to kidnappers.

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