NPR: Lynn Neary

Lynn Neary is an NPR arts correspondent and a frequent guest host often heard on Morning Edition, Weekend Edition and Talk of the Nation.

In her role on the Arts desk, Neary reports on an industry in transition as publishing moves into the digital age. As she covers books and publishing, she relishes the opportunity to interview many of her favorite authors from Barbara Kingsolver to Ian McKewan.

Arriving at NPR in 1982, Neary spent two years working as a newscaster during Morning Edition. Then, for the next eight years, Neary was the host of Weekend All Things Considered. In 1992, she joined the cultural desk to develop NPR's first religion beat. As religion correspondent, Neary covered the country's diverse religious landscape and the politics of the religious right.

Over the years Neary has won numerous prestigious awards including the Robert F. Kennedy Journalism award, the Corporation for Public Broadcasting Gold Award, an Ohio State Award, an Association of Women in Radio and Television Award and the Gabriel award. For her reporting on the role of religion in the debate over welfare reform, Neary shared in NPR’s 1996 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton Award.

A Fordham University graduate with a Bachelor of Arts in English, Neary thinks she has the ideal job and suspects she is the envy of English majors everywhere.

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3:43am

Fri May 29, 2015
Book News & Features

A Year Later, #WeNeedDiverseBooks Has Left Its Mark On BookCon

Originally published on Fri May 29, 2015 3:10 pm

In 2014, BookCon responded to the We Need Diverse Books campaign by inviting it to form its own panel. Pictured here (from left): I.W. Gregorio, Mike Jung, Matt de la Pena, Grace Lin and Jacqueline Woodson.
Courtesy of ReedPOP

Publishing's big week is almost over. The industry's annual convention, BookExpo America, ends Friday in New York, and on Saturday the publishing world opens its doors to the public with BookCon, where avid readers will get the chance to mix and mingle with their favorite authors.

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3:40am

Tue May 12, 2015
The Salt

In 'Organic Life,' The Making Of America's First Certified Organic Restaurant

Originally published on Tue May 12, 2015 12:56 pm

Chef, cookbook author and owner of Washington, D.C.'s Restaurant Nora, Nora Pouillon, in the restaurant's garden.
Courtesy of Noras.com

When restaurateur Nora Pouillon moved to the United States from Austria in the 1960s, she was surprised by how hard it was to get really fresh food. Everything was packaged and processed. Pouillon set out to find the find the best ingredients possible to cook for her family and friends. She brought that same sensibility to her Restaurant Nora, which eventually became the first certified organic restaurant in the country.

Pouillon writes about her lifelong devotion to food in a new memoir, My Organic Life: How A Pioneering Chef Helped Shape The Way We Eat Today.

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4:29pm

Fri March 6, 2015
Remembrances

Albert Maysles, Pioneering Documentary Filmmaker, Dies

Originally published on Fri March 6, 2015 7:04 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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6:29pm

Fri February 13, 2015
Television

See What 'Saturday Night Live' Looks Like The Rest Of The Week

Originally published on Sat February 14, 2015 7:17 am

Roseanne Roseannadanna (Gilda Radner) with Jane Curtin in 1979.
Edie Baskin Taschen

When Saturday Night Live went on the air 40 years ago, few would have guessed how many of the cast members would go on to become household names. But you've probably never heard of Edie Baskin and Mary Ellen Matthews. They're the official photographers on Saturday Night Live and their combined careers have spanned the life of the show. A collection of their work has been published to coincide with this year's anniversary broadcast on Sunday.

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6:42pm

Wed February 4, 2015
Book News & Features

Harper Lee's Friend Says Author Is Hard Of Hearing, Sound Of Mind

Originally published on Thu February 5, 2015 7:35 am

Author Harper Lee attends a ceremony in Montgomery, Ala., in 2007.
Rob Carr AP

News that a second novel by Harper Lee will be published next July has thrilled fans of her first novel, To Kill a Mockingbird, but it has also been met with some skepticism and concern. Lee has been involved in several legal skirmishes and controversies in recent years, raising questions about whether she is being taken advantage of in her old age.

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5:47pm

Mon February 2, 2015
Book News & Features

'Adventures Of Beekle' Wins Caldecott; Newbery Goes To 'The Crossover'

Originally published on Wed February 4, 2015 11:39 am

In Dan Santat's The Adventures of Beekle, an imaginary friend sets out to find a child who needs him.
Courtesy of Little Brown and Company Books for Young Readers

Parents on the hunt for great kids' books get some help each year when the American Library Association gives out its Youth Media Awards. On Monday, the association announced a long list of winners in a variety of categories.

The two that get the most attention are the John Newbery Medal for most outstanding contribution to children's literature and the Randolph Caldecott Medal for picture book artistry. This year's Newbery went to Kwame Alexander's The Crossover, and the Caldecott went to Dan Santat's The Adventures of Beekle: The Unimaginary Friend.

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3:31am

Wed December 31, 2014
Book News & Features

Vocab Tech For Toddlers Encourages 'Anytime, Anywhere Learning'

Originally published on Wed December 31, 2014 11:54 am

The Sesame Workshop app called Big Bird's Words helps children not only learn new vocabulary, but also understand the interconnectedness between words.
Sesame Workshop

When the children's television show Sesame Street first hit the air in 1969, many were deeply skeptical that you could use TV to introduce very young children to the basics of reading and math. But the experiment proved to be a remarkable success; Sesame Street has reached several generations of toddlers with its combination of educational content and pure entertainment. And now, Sesame Workshop is using new technology to reach the next generation.

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5:06am

Mon December 29, 2014
Book News & Features

Nonprofit Fights Illiteracy By Getting Books To Kids Who Need Them

Originally published on Fri February 6, 2015 3:09 pm

First Book President and CEO Kyle Zimmer reads to children during a book distribution event.
Courtesy of First Book

When it comes to learning to read, educators agree: the younger, the better. Children can be exposed to books even before they can talk, but for that a family has to have books, which isn't always the case.

There are neighborhoods in this country with plenty of books; and then there are neighborhoods where books are harder to find. Almost 15 years ago, Susan Neuman, now a professor at New York University, focused on that discrepancy, in a study that looked at just how many books were available in Philadelphia's low-income neighborhoods. The results were startling.

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1:16pm

Thu December 18, 2014
The Salt

Tourtiere: A French-Canadian Twist On Christmas Pie

Originally published on Thu December 18, 2014 4:21 pm

Tourtiere is a savory, spiced meat pie, which both French- and English-speaking Canadians love to serve around the holidays.
martiapunts iStockphoto

A version of this story was originally published on Dec. 23, 2011.

If you happen to spend Christmas Eve in Canada — especially Quebec — you might be lucky enough to be invited to a festive dinner after midnight Mass. The feast is an old tradition from France called reveillon, and it's something to look forward to after a long day of fasting.

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5:46pm

Mon November 24, 2014
Book News & Features

Long-Lost Letter That Inspired 'On The Road' Style Has Been Found

Originally published on Tue November 25, 2014 10:15 am

A stream of consciousness letter Neal Cassady wrote to Jack Kerouac helped inspire the style of On The Road. The original manuscript of the first draft of Jack Kerouac's best-seller is shown above.
Darron Cummings AP

When Jack Kerouac's On the Road was first published in 1957 no one had ever seen anything quite like it. As it turns out, that stream of consciousness style that Kerouac made famous owes a huge debt to a letter written by his friend Neal Cassady. Among Kerouac scholars and fans it became known as the "Joan Anderson letter." It was missing for 65 years, but it has been found and will be auctioned next month.

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4:16pm

Thu November 13, 2014
Book News & Features

Amazon, Hachette Reach Agreement Over E-Book Prices

Originally published on Fri November 14, 2014 10:31 am

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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2:59pm

Mon November 3, 2014
Remembrances

Tom Magliozzi, Popular Co-Host Of NPR's 'Car Talk,' Dies At 77

Originally published on Mon November 3, 2014 6:23 pm

Tom Magliozzi's laugh boomed in NPR listeners' ears every week as he and his brother, Ray, bantered on Car Talk.
Courtesy of Car Talk

Tom Magliozzi, one of public radio's most popular personalities, died on Monday of complications from Alzheimer's disease. He was 77 years old.

Tom and his brother, Ray, became famous as "Click and Clack the Tappet Brothers" on the weekly NPR show Car Talk. They bantered, told jokes, laughed and sometimes even gave pretty good advice to listeners who called in with their car troubles.

If there was one thing that defined Tom Magliozzi, it was his laugh. It was loud, it was constant, it was infectious.

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9:13am

Thu October 9, 2014
Books

French Novelist Patrick Modiano Wins Literature Nobel

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

We heard an announcement a short time ago from Peter Englund of the Swedish Academy, which chooses the winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature.

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4:35pm

Fri August 8, 2014
Book News & Features

Over 900 Authors Lend Their Names To A Letter Backing Hachette

Originally published on Fri August 8, 2014 6:57 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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6:01pm

Mon July 14, 2014
Remembrances

Writer Nadine Gordimer Captured Apartheid's Contradictions

Originally published on Mon July 14, 2014 8:32 pm

In addition to her 15 novels, Nadine Gordimer authored several volumes of short stories and nonfiction.
Radu Sigheti Reuters /Landov

South African writer Nadine Gordimer, who won the Nobel Prize in literature in 1991, died Sunday at the age of 90. Gordimer merged the personal and political to create a compelling portrait of the injustice of life under apartheid.

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6:34pm

Thu July 3, 2014
The Two-Way

Authors Take Opposite Sides On Hachette, Amazon Spat

Originally published on Fri July 4, 2014 10:43 am

Kevork Djansezian Getty Images

You might think that all writers would be of the same mind about the dispute between Amazon and Hachette Publishing Company over the price of ebooks. Think again. This week two different sets of authors sent open letters to their "readers" urging them to take one side or the other in the ongoing controversy.

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5:17pm

Tue June 10, 2014
Law

Court OKs Universities' Quest To Turn To More Digital Copies Of Books

Originally published on Wed June 11, 2014 9:43 am

A U.S. appeals court has ruled against a group of authors, deciding in favor of a consortium of universities in a case that hinged on copyright law and provisions of the Americans with Disabilities Act. The universities had allowed Google to make digital copies of more than 10 million books so that they could be searchable by specific terms.

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4:36pm

Mon June 2, 2014
Book News & Features

Amazon's Pricing Dispute Sets Book Expo Buzzing

Originally published on Tue June 3, 2014 12:02 pm

The dispute between retail giant Amazon and publisher Hachette was big news at Book Expo America. Writers, publishers and agents are wondering what the rift could mean for the future of books.

10:06am

Wed May 28, 2014
The Two-Way

Maya Angelou, Poet, Activist And Singular Storyteller, Dies At 86

Originally published on Wed May 28, 2014 9:11 pm

Angelou became Hollywood's first black female movie director on Nov. 3, 1971. She also wrote the script and music for Caged Bird, which was based on her best-selling 1969 autobiography. She had been a professional singer, dancer, writer, composer, poet, lecturer, editor and San Francisco streetcar conductor.
AP

Poet, performer and political activist Maya Angelou has died after a long illness at her home in Winston-Salem, N.C. She was 86. Born in St. Louis in 1928, Angelou grew up in a segregated society that she worked to change during the civil rights era. Angelou, who refused to speak for much of her childhood, revealed the scars of her past in I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings, the first of a series of memoirs.

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5:06pm

Tue March 25, 2014
Author Interviews

'Sous Chef' Reveals The High-Adrenaline Dance Behind Your Dinner

Originally published on Tue March 25, 2014 8:03 pm

Viktor Cap iStockphoto

A restaurant kitchen at the peak of the dinner rush can be a crazy place — hot, crowded and filled with a kind of intense energy that some people, like Michael Gibney, thrive on. Gibney's been working in restaurants since he was young. In his new book, Sous Chef, Gibney tries to capture the rhythm of the kitchen by taking his readers through one day in the life of a fast-paced New York restaurant.

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5:30pm

Thu March 13, 2014
The Two-Way

Pew Study: Many Technophiles Also Love Libraries

Julie Ball at a newly renovated computer lab at Shute Park Branch Library in Hillsboro, Oregon. The new lab is set to open on Saturday.
Benjamin Brink The Oregonian/Landov

You might think that in a world of Google and Wikipedia, people who love technology wouldn't care much about the musty old local public library. But, according to a new report by the Pew Research Internet Project, you'd be wrong.

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5:04am

Fri January 31, 2014
Author Interviews

What Wakes B.J. Novak Up In The Middle Of The Night?

Originally published on Fri January 31, 2014 7:58 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, HOST:

When we talk about a triple threat we're often talking about a versatile athlete. Think about a basketball player who can score, defend, and rebound. In show biz, B. J. Novak may be that triple threat. He can do standup, act, and write successfully in all cases. He got his start doing standup comedy. That led to a job on the hit comedy series "The Office" where he had a regular part and was one of the writers.

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5:30am

Tue January 28, 2014
Books News & Features

The Annual Awards For Children's Books Are Out

Originally published on Tue January 28, 2014 8:20 am

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

OK, the Grammy Awards are behind us. The Oscars are around the corner. And now, we have another award that also gets a lot of attention this time of year, from people who love kids' books.

The American Library Association has announced this year's Caldecott and Newbery Award winners. NPR's Lynn Neary reports.

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7:08pm

Wed January 8, 2014
Author Interviews

In An Age Of Slavery, Two Women Fight For Their 'Wings'

Originally published on Wed January 8, 2014 10:29 pm

iStockphoto

Sue Monk Kidd's new novel is a story told by two women whose lives are wrapped together — beginning, against their wills, when they're young girls. One is a slave; the other, her reluctant owner. One strives her whole life to be free; the other rebels against her slave-owning family and becomes a prominent abolitionist and early advocate for women's rights.

The book, The Invention of Wings, takes on both slavery and feminism — and it's inspired by the life of a real historical figure.

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8:05am

Sat December 7, 2013
Books News & Features

Don't Call It Fanfic: Writers Rework Their Favorite Stories

Originally published on Fri December 27, 2013 12:43 pm

When writers finish a book, they may think they've had the last word. But sometimes another writer will decide there's more to the story. The madwoman Bertha from Jane Eyre and the father in Little Women are just two examples of secondary characters who have been given a fuller life in a new work of fiction based on a classic novel.

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5:05pm

Mon November 18, 2013
The Kennedy Assassination, 50 Years Later

50 Years After Assassination, Kennedy Books Offer New Analysis

Originally published on Mon November 18, 2013 6:27 pm

President John F. Kennedy and his wife, Jacqueline, are greeted by an enthusiastic crowd upon their arrival at Dallas Love Field on Nov. 22, 1963.
AP

In the 50 years since the assassination of President John F. Kennedy, the public has never tired of books about the charismatic young president and his tragic death.

This year, the market has been particularly flooded with Kennedy books — from glossy photograph collections to serious biographies and histories to a new round of books devoted to conspiracy theories.

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4:53pm

Sun November 10, 2013
Author Interviews

A Panorama Of Devastation: Drawing Of WWI Battle Spans 24 Feet

Originally published on Sun November 10, 2013 6:58 pm

Detail from Plate 11 of Joe Sacco's The Great War: July 1, 1916: The First Day of the Battle of the Somme. On July 1st, at precisely 7:30 a.m., the attack commences.
Joe Sacco Courtesy of W. W. Norton & Company

Joe Sacco is a cartoonist, graphic novelist and journalist; he's best-known for his dispatches from today's regions of conflict, like the Middle East and Bosnia, in cartoon form. But for his latest book, The Great War, Sacco turns his eye on history. He's recreated of one of the worst battles of World War I, the first day of the Battle of the Somme, from its hopeful beginning to its brutal end.

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5:02pm

Tue October 15, 2013
Books News & Features

'Quiet Dell' Revives A Depression-Era Murder Story

Originally published on Tue October 15, 2013 6:12 pm

Crowds gather on Aug. 30, 1931, at the site of the Quiet Dell murders. Evidence of the killings was found in and around murderer Harry Powers' garage (center).
AP

The Quiet Dell murders were among the first big, sensational crime stories of the Depression: A serial killer corresponded with vulnerable widows he met through lonely hearts clubs, then lured them to their deaths.

As a child, writer Jayne Anne Phillips learned about the murders from her mother, who was a child in 1931, when the murders took place. Phillips says she didn't talk a lot about the tragedy, but whenever they drove close to where the crime occurred — near Clarksburg, W.Va. — her mother would say, "There's the road to Quiet Dell."

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3:57am

Mon September 23, 2013
Author Interviews

Political Violence, Uneasy Silence Echo In Lahiri's 'Lowland'

Originally published on Mon September 23, 2013 2:02 pm

Pulitzer Prize-winner Jhumpa Lahiri is the author of The Namesake and Interpreter of Maladies.
Marco Delogu Courtesy of Knopf

Earlier this month, Jhumpa Lahiri rejected the idea of immigrant fiction. "I don't know what to make of the term," she told The New York Times. "All American fiction could be classified as immigrant fiction."

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4:44pm

Mon September 16, 2013
Books News & Features

National Book Awards Look To Raise Profile ... And It's Not The First Time

Originally published on Tue September 17, 2013 2:19 pm

The 2013 National Book Award long list for Young People's Literature was announced Monday. Click here to see the full list.
nationalbook.org

You may be hearing a lot about the National Book Awards this week — at least that's what the National Book Foundation hopes. That's because they've made some changes to the awards that they hope will get more people talking about them. Over four days starting Monday, they will roll out their nominees in four different categories — beginning with Young People's Literature and ending Thursday with Fiction.

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