NPR: Jeff Brady

Jeff Brady is a NPR National Desk Correspondent based in Philadelphia. He covers the mid-Atlantic region and the energy industry.

In this role, Brady reports on the business of energy, from concerns over hydraulic fracturing in Western Pennsylvania to the oil boom in North Dakota and solar developments in the desert Southwest. With a focus on the consumer, Brady's reporting addresses how the energy industry intersects consumers' perspective at the gas pump and light switch.

Frequently traveling throughout the country for NPR, Brady has covered just about every major domestic news event in the past decade. Before moving to Philadelphia in July 2011, Brady was based in Denver and covered the west for NPR.

In 2005, Brady was among the NPR reporters who covered the aftermath of Hurricane Katrina. His reporting on flooded cars left behind after the storm exposed efforts to stall the implementation of a national car titling system. Today, the National Motor Vehicle Title Information System is operational and the Department of Justice estimates it could save car buyers up to $11 billion a year.

Before coming to NPR in September 2003, Brady was a reporter at Oregon Public Broadcasting (OPB) in Portland. He has also worked in commercial television as an anchor and a reporter; and commercial radio as a talk-show host and reporter.

Brady graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in Communications from Southern Oregon State College (now Southern Oregon University).

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4:58am

Mon May 18, 2015
Around the Nation

Amtrak Victims Remembered During Memorial Service

Originally published on Mon May 18, 2015 9:00 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

Amtrak trains are running again between Philadelphia and New York. The line was closed for almost a week after a passenger train derailed. Last night, people paused in Philadelphia to remember the dead as NPR's Jeff Brady reports.

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6:14pm

Sat May 16, 2015
U.S.

Amtrak Ordered To Improve Safety Along Northeast Corridor

Originally published on Sun May 17, 2015 3:59 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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4:30pm

Fri May 8, 2015
Economy

Oil Companies Look To Fill Employment Gap With More Women

Originally published on Fri May 8, 2015 10:38 pm

After completing training in 2013, Claire Kerstetter now works as a fluid technician on fracking jobs.
Jeff Brady NPR

Look at the oil business and you'll notice it's mostly men. That's a problem for an industry that needs legions of new workers to replace retirees in coming years.

The industry hasn't always treated women fairly, but now it needs them.

The oil business just 30 years ago was a lonely place for the few women who chose to work in it. Rayola Dougher, senior economic adviser at the American Petroleum Institute, says attending industry conferences made that clear.

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4:27pm

Thu April 30, 2015
Law

Baltimore Police Conclude Investigation Into Freddie Gray's Death

Originally published on Thu April 30, 2015 8:19 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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4:44pm

Fri April 24, 2015
U.S.

LGBT Activists Push States To Expand Anti-Discrimination Laws

Originally published on Fri April 24, 2015 8:27 pm

Same-sex marriage is legal in most states but so is discrimination against lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender people in the areas of employment, housing and public accommodation.

Gay-rights activists say this creates a contradiction because in many states someone can legally marry a person of the same gender and then get fired for being gay. They are lobbying state legislatures to add LGBT people to anti-discrimination laws that already include things like race, age, religion and disability.

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3:29am

Mon April 13, 2015
Business

In Pennsylvania, Employment Booms Amid Oil And Natural Gas Bust

Originally published on Mon April 13, 2015 8:00 am

Students at the Pennsylvania College of Technology are learning a technique called "tripping pipe," moving a pipe from a stack into a horizontal position and lowering it down into a well. The students train on a practice drilling rig to learn how to be roustabouts.
Jeff Brady NPR

Lower oil and natural gas prices have the petroleum industry laying off tens of thousands of workers. It looks like a decade-long trend of job growth in the U.S. oil business may end.

But there are parts of the country where those job numbers are still rising. Pennsylvania is one of them.

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5:46pm

Tue March 31, 2015
U.S.

Supporters Work To Reclaim Legacy Of Penn State Coach Joe Paterno

Originally published on Wed April 1, 2015 2:23 pm

Supporters of former Penn State head football coach Joe Paterno have launched a campaign to reclaim his legacy, including an initiative to have his statute returned to the university grounds.
Gene J. Puskar AP

The Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse scandal rocked Penn State University in 2011, and the fallout from the case continues today. A series of lawsuits are ongoing and, now, a campaign is underway to restore the legacy of the university's former head football coach Joe Paterno.

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4:24pm

Tue March 3, 2015
U.S.

Not Clearing The Snow Off Your Car Before Driving Could Cost You

Originally published on Tue March 3, 2015 6:25 pm

A driver clears his car windshield in Boston on Jan. 27, after a heavy storm hit the city. Pennsylvania could be the next state to pass legislation that would cite drivers that take to the road before removing the hazardous ice and snow.
Robert Nickelsberg Getty Images

After weeks of winter storms, snow fatigue has set in across much of the country.

You may be tired of clearing ice and snow off your car, but that can be a safety hazard. And now you could face a fine in some states.

Mike Taylor of Elkins Park, Pa., says just this week he was behind a car on the Pennsylvania Turnpike when, "Snow on the roof blew off, hit my windshield, forced me to jiggle, and it was only because of the stability of the car and I slowed down that I didn't have an accident," Taylor says.

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3:37am

Tue February 10, 2015
Your Money

The Great Solar Panel Debate: To Lease Or To Buy?

Originally published on Tue February 10, 2015 12:12 pm

Elizabeth Ebinger in Maplewood, N.J., bought her solar panels, while neighbor Tim Roebuck signed a 20-year lease. Both are happy with the approach they took, and both are saving money on energy bills.
Jeff Brady NPR

More than 600,000 homes in the U.S. have solar panels today — up dramatically from just a few years ago, according to the Solar Energy Industries Association. Leasing programs that require little or no money up-front have played a key role in that growth.

But here's a question for homeowners: Is it better to lease or buy?

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4:09pm

Mon January 19, 2015
Economy

U.S. Solar Industry Sees Growth, But Also Some Uncertainty

Originally published on Mon January 19, 2015 7:32 pm

A worker installs solar panels atop a government building in Lakewood, Colo. The industry has added more than 80,000 jobs since 2010, according to The Solar Foundation.
John Moore Getty Images

The solar energy business is growing fast, thanks in part to a steep drop in panel prices.

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4:36pm

Fri January 9, 2015
Energy

Future Of Keystone XL Pipeline Back In Obama's Hands

Originally published on Mon January 12, 2015 5:06 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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4:38pm

Thu January 1, 2015
The Salt

A Restaurant That Serves Up A Side Of Social Goals

Originally published on Thu January 1, 2015 7:23 pm

Srirupa Dasgupta opened Upohar, a restaurant and catering service, with a social mission. Her employees — primarily refugees — earn double the minimum wage.
Jeff Brady NPR

This is part of a series of stories about starting over, profiling people who, by choice or circumstance, reinvented or transformed themselves.

When Srirupa Dasgupta came to the U.S. from India to attend college in the mid-1980s, she was determined to work in high-tech, not the restaurant industry. But today, she owns a small restaurant and catering service in Lancaster, Pa., and employs primarily refugees who might have trouble finding work elsewhere.

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4:29pm

Thu December 25, 2014
Economy

Low Gas Prices Predicted For 2015 And Beyond

Originally published on Mon December 29, 2014 12:13 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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12:51pm

Mon December 8, 2014
The Two-Way

Supreme Court Rejects BP's Challenge To Gulf Oil Spill Settlement

Originally published on Mon December 8, 2014 3:13 pm

The Deepwater Horizon oil rig burned on April 21, 2010.
U.S. Coast Guard Getty Images

Oil giant BP has suffered a legal setback in its effort to limit how much the company will pay under a 2012 settlement with thousands of individuals and businesses along the Gulf Coast. Without comment, the U.S. Supreme Court rejected BP's request that it review previous lower court decisions that favored plaintiffs.

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5:36pm

Sat December 6, 2014
Around the Nation

At Funeral For New York Man Shot By Police — More Outrage

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

6:38pm

Mon November 17, 2014
Energy

What You Need To Know About The Keystone XL Oil Pipeline

Originally published on Tue November 18, 2014 7:36 pm

Pipes for TransCanada's planned Keystone XL pipeline are stored in Gascoyne, N.D. The U.S. House has voted to approve the proposed project, which would allow crude oil to flow from Canada to the Gulf of Mexico. The Senate plans to vote Tuesday on legislation that would greenlight the project.
Andrew Cullen Reuters/Landov

Update at 7:35 p.m. ET: The Senate voted against completing the Keystone pipeline.

The remaining portion of the Keystone pipeline project, if completed, will be fewer than 1,200 miles long — just a fraction of the existing 2.6 million miles of oil and gas pipelines running beneath our feet in the United States.

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12:03am

Thu November 13, 2014
U.S.

After Solyndra Loss, U.S. Energy Loan Program Turning A Profit

Originally published on Thu November 20, 2014 11:53 pm

Beacon Power President and CEO Barry Brits, at the company's plant in Hazle Township, Pa. He says a loan from the Department of Energy made it possible for his company to develop its flywheel energy storage technology.
Jeff Brady NPR

In 2011, solar panel company Solyndra defaulted on a $535 million loan guaranteed by the Department of Energy. The agency had a few other high-profile bankruptcies, too — electric car company Fisker and solar company Abound among them.

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3:23am

Tue November 4, 2014
Business

Falling Oil Prices Make Fracking Less Lucrative

Originally published on Tue November 4, 2014 12:35 pm

Pumpjacks at the Inglewood oil fields in California in March. Some of the most controversial methods of oil extraction, like fracking, oil sands production and Arctic drilling, are also expensive. That's made them less profitable as the price of oil continues to fall.
Richard Vogel AP

Oil prices are down than more than 25 percent since June and are staying low for now. Drivers may appreciate that, but for oil companies, it's making some of the most controversial methods of producing oil less profitable — and in a few cases, unprofitable.

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5:30pm

Thu October 30, 2014
U.S.

Nurse Kaci Hickox Takes A Bike Ride, Defying Maine's Quarantine

Originally published on Thu October 30, 2014 6:27 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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2:51pm

Tue September 16, 2014
The Two-Way

BP Lawyers Use Old-School Trick; Judge Not Amused

Originally published on Wed September 17, 2014 1:04 am

U.S. District Court Judge Carl Barbier ruled nearly two weeks ago that BP acted recklessly in the 2010 Deepwater Horizon rig accident and oil spill.
Alastair Grant AP

Back in school, did you ever fudge the spacing on a report to meet the teacher's page-length requirement? Lawyers representing oil company BP tried something similar in a recent court filing connected to the company's 2010 drilling rig accident and oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico.

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3:43am

Tue September 16, 2014
Energy

With U.S. Oil Supply Climbing, Some Call For End To Export Ban

Originally published on Tue September 16, 2014 10:37 am

Pump jacks are seen in an oil field over the Monterey Shale formation near Lost Hills, Calif. Much of the U.S. oil industry wants to lift an export ban that followed the 1970s energy crisis.
David McNew Getty Images

An oil drilling boom that has made the U.S. the world's leading oil and petroleum product producer has some people urging an end to the four-decade ban on exporting domestic crude.

Some in the oil industry are launching a campaign to lift the ban, and they hope to win over a skeptical public.

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3:38am

Fri August 29, 2014
Business

As BP Pays For Oil Spill Impact, Some People Aren't Seeing The Cash

Originally published on Mon September 1, 2014 7:55 am

Patrick Roy's company, Coastal Rental Equipment, used to rent these large pumps to offshore divers who work for oil and natural gas drillers. After the BP oil spill, when the government introduced a moratorium on drilling in the Gulf of Mexico, the Patterson, La., business suffered losses and eventually shut down.
Jeff Brady NPR

BP's 2010 oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico disrupted business all along the coastline. Through the end of July, the oil giant paid more than $13 billion to compensate people, businesses and communities affected. The company is disputing some of those claims in court battles that could drag on for years.

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3:38am

Tue August 19, 2014
Shots - Health News

Pittsburgh Health Care Giants Take Fight To Each Other's Turf

Originally published on Fri August 22, 2014 10:47 am

The headquarters for University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and Highmark Blue Cross/Blue Shield dominate the Pittsburgh skyline much as they organizations have dominated health care in the region for decades.
Jeff Brady NPR

Pittsburgh's dominant health insurance company and its largest healthcare provider are, essentially, getting a divorce.

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5:00am

Fri August 1, 2014
Business

Tensions Stir At EPA Hearings On New Emission Rules

Originally published on Fri August 1, 2014 7:14 am

Some 5,000 union members, led by the United Mine Workers of America, march outside the William S. Moorhead Federal Building on Thursday in Pittsburgh. The city hosted two days of public hearings by the Environmental Protection Agency on stricter pollution rules for coal-burning power plants.
Gene J. Puskar AP

The coal industry made its presence known in Pittsburgh this week for public hearings on President Obama's controversial plan to address climate change. A key element is rules the Environmental Protection Agency proposed in June. They would cut greenhouse gas emissions — chiefly carbon dioxide — from existing power plants. The national goal is 30 percent by 2030, based on 2005 levels.

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4:45pm

Fri July 25, 2014
Mental Health

Pa. Hospital Sees Gun Fight Between Psychiatrist And Patient

Originally published on Tue August 12, 2014 4:10 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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3:31am

Tue July 15, 2014
Business

Leased Solar Panels Can Cast A Shadow Over A Home's Value

Originally published on Thu July 17, 2014 11:11 am

Mark Bortman of Exact Solar in Yardley, Pa., says having leased solar panels on a roof can add an extra step when selling a house. He says typically a buyer will assume the remainder of the lease, but that requires a credit check and some paperwork
Jeff Brady NPR

Installing solar panels on a house to generate electricity often costs $20,000 or more, and many homeowners have turned to leasing programs to avoid those upfront costs. But most leases are for 20 years, and that can present problems if someone wants to sell the house before the lease is completed.

Peter Auditore of El Granada, Calif., was happy with the leased solar panels he installed a few years back. When he decided to sell, he found a buyer who also appreciated the environmental benefits of solar panels. But then there was a hitch just as the sale was about to go through.

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7:09pm

Fri July 4, 2014
Around the Nation

Safety Changes Are Small Comfort When Oil Trains Pass

Originally published on Sun July 6, 2014 6:27 pm

Firefighters douse blazes after a freight train loaded with oil derailed in Lac-Megantic, Quebec, last July.
AFP/Getty Images

A fiery oil train derailment in Canada killed 47 people a year ago, prompting regulators and railroads in the U.S. to make changes. Some who live near where oil trains travel are still worried, though.

Amy Roe with the Delaware chapter of the Sierra Club lives not far from where tank cars transport and store crude oil. Roe wishes the country would move away from fossil fuels faster. That plays into her opposition to oil trains, but she's also concerned about safety, especially after the accident that happened last July in Lac-Megantic, Quebec.

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6:57am

Tue June 24, 2014
Around the Nation

Report: Jerry Sandusky Case Was Unnecessarily Delayed

Originally published on Tue June 24, 2014 3:42 pm

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

A new report is calling into question how the Jerry Sandusky child sexual abuse investigation was handled. Sandusky, a former Penn State assistant football coach, was convicted of sexually assaulting 10 boys. Now, Pennsylvania's attorney general says Sandusky could have been brought to justice sooner. NPR's Jeff Brady has this story.

JEFF BRADY, BYLINE: Reports that Jerry Sandusky was abusing children at circulated for years. So when he was arrested in 2011, Kathleen Kane had this question.

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4:06pm

Tue June 17, 2014
Education

Philly Schools Teeter On Brink Of Layoffs, Struggling For Funding

Originally published on Tue June 17, 2014 8:33 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. Once again, one of the most troubled school districts in the country is sounding alarm bells over funding. The head of the Philadelphia school district says he needs almost $100 million, and even that, he says, would just maintain a status quo he calls inadequate. NPR's Jeff Brady reports.

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4:36pm

Mon June 2, 2014
Environment

EPA Lays Out Centerpiece To Obama's Climate Change Policy

Originally published on Mon June 2, 2014 6:50 pm

The Obama administration is announcing new pollution standards Monday. The rules, key elements of President Obama's climate change policy, may decide the fate of coal-fired power plants in the U.S.

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