NPR: Carrie Kahn

Carrie Kahn is NPR's international correspondent based in Mexico City, Mexico. She covers Mexico, the Caribbean and Central America. Kahn's reports can be heard on NPR's award-winning news programs including All Things Considered, Morning Edition and Weekend Edition.

Prior to her post in Mexico Kahn had been a National Correspondent based in Los Angeles since joining NPR in 2003. During that time Kahn often reported on and from Mexico, most recently covering the country's presidential election in 2012. She was the first NPR reporter into Haiti after the devastating earthquake in early 2010, and has returned to the country six times in the two years since to detail recovery and relief efforts, and the political climate.

Her work included assignments throughout California and the West. In 2010 Kahn was awarded the Headliner Award for Best in Show and Best Investigative Story for her work covering U.S. informants involved in the Mexican Drug War. In 2005, Kahn was part of NPR's extensive coverage of Hurricane Katrina, where she investigated claims of euthanasia in New Orleans hospitals, recovery efforts along the Gulf Coast and resettlement of city residents in Houston, TX. She has covered her share of hurricanes since, fire storms and mudslides in Southern California and the controversial life and death of pop-icon Michael Jackson. In 2008, as China hosted the world's athletes, Kahn recorded a remembrance of her Jewish grandfather and his decision to compete in Hitler's 1936 Olympics.

Before coming to NPR in 2003, Kahn worked for 2 1/2 years at NPR station KQED in San Francisco, first as an editor and then as a general assignment reporter with a focus on immigration reporting. From 1994 to 2001, Kahn was the border and community affairs reporter at NPR station KPBS in San Diego, where she covered Northern Mexico, immigration, cross-border issues and the city's ethnic communities.

While at KPBS, Kahn received numerous awards, including back-to-back Sol Price Awards for Responsible Journalism from the Society of Professional Journalists. She won the California/Nevada Associated Press award for Best News Feature, eight Golden Mike Awards from the Radio & TV News Association of Southern California and numerous prizes from the San Diego Press Club and the Society of Professional Journalists of San Diego. She was also awarded three consecutive La Pluma Awards from the California Chicano News Media Association.

Prior to joining KPBS, Kahn worked for NPR station KUSP and published a bilingual community newspaper in Santa Cruz, CA.

Kahn is frequently called upon to lecture or discuss border issues and bi-national journalism. Her work has been cited for fairness and balance by the Poynter Institute of Media Studies. She was awarded and completed a Pew Fellowship in International Journalism at Johns Hopkins University.

Kahn received a Bachelors degree from UC Santa Cruz in Biology. For several years she was a human genetics researcher in California and in Costa Rica. She has traveled extensively throughout Mexico, Central America, Europe and the Middle East, where she worked on a English/Hebrew/Arabic magazine.

Pages

6:03pm

Wed April 25, 2012
Around the Nation

After Riots, Scandal Sparked Reform In LAPD

Originally published on Wed April 25, 2012 8:28 pm

Los Angeles police form a line to keep a crowd from entering a building on April 30, 1992. Twenty years after the L.A. riots, most civil rights and community groups give the LAPD high marks for progress.
Nick Ut AP

It's been 20 years since Los Angeles erupted in riots following the acquittal of four white police officers in the beating of black motorist Rodney King. There have been many changes in the city since those days of fire, looting and public discord, but perhaps the biggest changes can be seen in L.A.'s police department.

On a drive around the heart of South Central L.A., there are still plenty of weed-filled lots where businesses that burned down in the riots used to stand. There's also still a lot of crime.

Read more

4:00am

Wed March 28, 2012
Politics

Bill Maher's Obama SuperPAC Donation Causes Stir

Bill Maher, shown here at a 2011 event in Los Angeles, gave $1 million to the superPAC supporting President Obama's re-election bid.
Chris Pizzello AP

Comedian Bill Maher's $1 million check to the superPAC supporting President Obama's re-election is the first seven-figure donation to the group since Obama tacitly endorsed the fundraising strategy in early February.

And it has brought new focus to some of Maher's statements about women — specifically Republican women — and led to calls for the White House to disavow the HBO host and his money.

Read more

5:19pm

Tue February 21, 2012
Shots - Health Blog

The Big Squeeze: Calif. Weight Loss Clinics Under Investigation

Originally published on Tue February 21, 2012 6:24 pm

A group of weight-loss clinics in Southern California is under fire for an aggressive advertising campaign and the death of five patients.

The 1-800-GET-THIN marketing campaign and its affiliated surgical centers are being investigated by local, state and federal agencies, including Congress.

Read more

4:10pm

Wed February 8, 2012
It's All Politics

After Glum Night, Romney May Find Signs Of Hope In Colorado Swing County

Originally published on Wed February 8, 2012 7:09 pm

A Mitt Romney supporter holds up a sign showing her love for Romney and Denver Broncos quarterback Tim Tebow at a rally for the GOP presidential candidate at Arapahoe High School this week in Centennial, Colo.
Marc Piscotty Getty Images

While Rick Santorum won Colorado along with two other states last night, he did not win the key Colorado county of Arapahoe.

Political experts say Arapahoe has been on the winning side in nearly every presidential election of the past four decades.

Read more

5:25pm

Mon February 6, 2012
Election 2012

In Battleground Colorado, Independents On The Rise

Originally published on Mon February 6, 2012 7:33 pm

An attendee holds American flags during a rally Saturday in Colorado Springs, Colo. The rally was for Republican Mitt Romney, but a new study says the number of newly declared independents is outpacing new registration for either Republicans or Democrats in the state.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

At the upscale Cherry Creek Mall in Denver, Scott Kardos, 24, said he's not interested in being either a Democrat or a Republican.

"I don't really identify with either party," said Kardos, a recent college graduate with an electrical engineering degree, who was shopping with his girlfriend and her parents. "A lot of the things I agree with the Republican side, and a lot of things I agree on the Democrat side. So, can't really decide on either one, and I flip-flop pretty much every other election on who I'd rather vote for."

Read more

8:00am

Sun February 5, 2012
Presidential Race

Support, Protest And Hiccups During The Nev. Caucus

Mitt Romney was the big winner in Saturday's Nevada caucus, leaving runner-up Newt Gingrich in the dust. Organizers said tens of thousands of people participated in the West's first presidential contest of the year, and some of them were still taking part late into the night. NPR's Carrie Kahn reports.

5:16pm

Fri February 3, 2012
It's All Politics

Voting Heads West: A Nevada Republican Presidential Caucus Primer

Originally published on Fri February 3, 2012 6:54 pm

Men arrive at a campaign rally for Mitt Romney in Elko, Nev., on Friday.
Emmanuel Dunand AFP/Getty Images

While hotels along the Vegas Strip are full of Super Bowl fans and convention attendees this weekend, another event will be playing out Saturday at more than 100 locations across the state.

Nevada's Republican presidential caucuses will be taking place, not in expensive hotels, but mostly in low-key places like schools and firehouses.

David Gallagher of the Nevada state GOP says each county's local party is responsible for organizing its own caucus, so opening times vary.

Read more

4:00am

Thu January 26, 2012
Election 2012

Will Nevada Be A Blue State In November?

President Obama visits Nevada on his post-State of the Union trip Thursday. He won the state in 2008. But with unemployment now at nearly 13 percent, the state will be more of a challenge in this fall's presidential election.

5:11pm

Tue December 6, 2011

6:00am

Sat November 26, 2011
Around the Nation

At LAPD, Predicting Crimes Before They Happen

Originally published on Sat November 26, 2011 5:17 pm

A resident talks with a Los Angeles police officer after another officer was wounded during a shooting in the city in August. Under a program the LAPD is rolling out this month, computer statistics will be used to predict where a crime will occur. Officials hope that the technique will help reduce crime.
Nick Ut AP

Capt. Sean Malinowski of the Los Angeles Police Department does his crime-fighting in front of a computer screen.

He's in the LAPD's Real Time Analysis and Critical Response Division, located in a new crime data and analysis center in downtown Los Angeles. Malinowski is tracking two crimes that just occurred in south Los Angeles. Patrol cars are already on the scene. He says this facility is state of the art in real-time policing. He wants the force to be the best in predicting where criminals will strike.

Read more

12:01am

Wed November 16, 2011
National Security

Small Fishing Boats Smuggle People To California

Originally published on Wed November 16, 2011 11:25 am

Fishermen and visitors gather at the beach in the village of Popotla, Mexico, some 15 miles south of the U.S.-Mexico border, in July 2010. Illegal immigrants are increasingly looking to the ocean, as they consider crossing overland more risky.
Guillermo Arias AP

Most mornings George Uraguchi grabs his paddle board and heads down a steep, secluded canyon in Palos Verdes, one of Los Angeles County's wealthier coastal communities. On one recent morning, though, his predawn excursion was interrupted by what he saw in the still water.

"It was more than just debris," Uraguchi says. "I saw some life jackets, and when I looked a little bit closer, then sure enough there was an overturned boat out there."

Uraguchi called 911, then hopped into the water and paddled out through the floating life jackets and bobbing fuel cans.

Read more

4:00am

Fri October 28, 2011
U.S.

Occupy Violence Reignites Criticism Of Oakland Police

Originally published on Fri October 28, 2011 8:48 am

Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, host: This is MORNING EDITION from NPR News. I'm Ari Shapiro. Renee Montagne and Steve Inskeep are away. In Oakland, California, protestors with the Occupy Wall Street movement continue to stand vigil in a downtown plaza in front of City Hall. This week, police fired teargas and bean bags at protestors. The incident is under investigation, and NPR's Carrie Kahn reports that the confrontation has reignited criticism of the Oakland police.

CARRIE KAHN: In the downtown park in front of City Hall, the protestors have changed their tune.

Read more

4:00am

Thu October 27, 2011
U.S.

Occupy Oakland Protester Hurt, Police Criticized

Originally published on Tue November 1, 2011 8:25 am

Transcript

RENEE MONTAGNE, HOST:

Protestors in Oakland, California gathered again in front of City Hall. Oakland's Occupy Wall Street last night was much more peaceful than the night before, when police used tear gas and non-lethal bullets to disperse the crowd. The confrontation left one protester hospitalized and it left allegations of excessive police force under investigation. NPR's Carrie Kahn reports.

(SOUNDBITE OF CHEERING AND APPLAUSE)

CARRIE KAHN, BYLINE: Protesters by the hundreds streamed into Oakland's downtown city hall plaza.

Read more

5:00am

Mon October 24, 2011
Election 2012

Latino Republicans Find Party A Tough Sell

Originally published on Mon October 24, 2011 7:03 pm

President Obama, seen here in North Chesterfield, Va., last week, is on a campaign swing through the West this week, making stops in California, Nevada and Colorado — states with significant Hispanic populations.

Jay Paul Getty Images

President Obama is on a campaign swing through the West this week, making stops in California, Nevada and Colorado — all states where Hispanic voters will play a pivotal role in next year's election.

Obama has lost popularity with Latinos recently, mostly due to the economy. But Hispanic voters looking for alternatives find problems with the Republican slate as well.

GOP presidential candidate Herman Cain recently said he'd "electrify" the U.S.-Mexico border fence "with a sign on it on the other side that says it can kill you."

Read more

3:34am

Sat October 1, 2011
Living Large: Obesity In America

Surgery Not 'A Magic Pill' For Obese Patients

Originally published on Wed October 5, 2011 3:41 pm

iStockphoto.com

Part of an ongoing series on obesity in America

Losing weight in America is big business. Americans spend $61 billion a year on everything from diet pills and exercise videos to meal plans, health club memberships and medical treatment. One of the fastest growing and lucrative segments of the weight-loss market is surgery.

Read more

3:44pm

Thu September 29, 2011
Around the Nation

L.A. County Prepares To Take On State Prisoners

Originally published on Thu September 29, 2011 6:15 pm

Los Angeles County Sheriff Lee Baca says he's already cleared as many as 4,000 beds in the county for the new group of prisoners, and he plans to use more home detention and electronic-monitoring systems.
Damian Dovarganes AP

The state of California will begin shifting responsibility Saturday for tens of thousands of prisoners to local officials. The unprecedented change is under way because the U.S. Supreme Court ordered the state to reduce its dangerously overcrowded prisons.

County officials have had just months to plan for the influx of prisoners and parolees into their communities. Of all the prisoners and parolees leaving the state's system, the bulk are headed to Los Angeles County. Los Angeles is expecting to have to deal with 15,000 additional criminals.

Read more

6:14am

Sun September 11, 2011
Reflecting On Sept. 11, 2001

San Diego Muslims Open Doors Amid Scrutiny

Parents bring their children to school near a mosque at the Islamic Center of San Diego, Sept. 19, 2001. The current head of the center says before Sept. 11 the Muslim community was insular. He now hosts interfaith meetings and participates in community groups.
David McNew Getty Images

Although thousands of miles from ground zero, the Muslim community in San Diego, Calif., drew attention after Sept. 11, 2001. Two of the hijackers lived there. They also prayed at a local mosque, where noted radical Imam Anwar al-Awlaki preached. Recently, several men from the Somali Muslim community were arrested. They've been charged with aiding a Somali terrorist group.

A local imam has been working to open dialogue between Muslims and the larger community in San Diego in part to combat the suspicion that arose after the local ties came to light.

Read more

12:01am

Tue August 23, 2011
Around the Nation

Conditions At California Prison To Be Reviewed

Faced with massive overcrowding, budget cuts and a weeks-long hunger strike by inmates, California is considering making changes to how it handles its toughest prisoners.

A state legislative panel will hear Tuesday about conditions at the state prison at Pelican Bay, where California's most dangerous convicts are shipped. Located near the Oregon border, Pelican Bay is hundreds of miles from any major city. It's the most isolated prison in the system: Think Alcatraz, but on land.

Read more

4:36pm

Thu July 21, 2011
Law

Hunger Strike Puts Focus On Calif. Prison Conditions

Demonstrators hold up a sign during a rally in front of the State Building in San Francisco on July 1 to support prisoners at Pelican Bay State Prison. Inmates in an isolation unit at the prison went on a hunger strike to protest conditions they describe as inhumane. The hunger strike later spread to other facilities.
Paul Sakuma AP

It appears that a three-week hunger strike by prisoners in California has ended. Officials with the state's Department of Corrections and Rehabilitation say inmates have started eating again after some of their demands were met. Chief among those demands was an end to long-term solitary confinement.

Advocates for prisoners say they can't confirm that the strike has actually ended.

Solitary Confinement Criticized

Read more

8:27am

Sat July 16, 2011
Sports

World Cup Gives Girls A Goal

Young female soccer players in the U.S. are ready for some new idols, like defender Rachel Buehler and forward Abby Wambach of the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team.
Mike Zarrilli Getty Images

A group of 11-year-old girls at a park in West Los Angeles gives one answer when asked who their female soccer player is: Mia Hamm.

Granted Hamm is one of the game's greatest players, but the U.S. women's star forward retired back when these girls were toddlers.

Gia Polizzi, Sydney Collyns and JoJo Levey have never seen Hamm play. They only know of her from YouTube, which incidentally didn't exist when Hamm was playing.

So they're ready for some new idols. The current U.S. Women's National Team has plenty; the girls just have to learn some new names.

Read more

2:45pm

Tue July 12, 2011
U.S.

Gay Victim's Trial Seeks Classmate's Murder Motive

The trial of a teen accused of killing a gay classmate, 15-year old Lawrence King, is underway in southern California and bringing national attention to the problem of gay bullying.

Prosecutors say the defendant murdered his classmate out of his hatred of homosexuals, but defense attorneys say their client snapped after being repeatedly harassed by the openly gay teen.

Read more

4:00am

Mon June 27, 2011
Around the Nation

Historic Floodwaters Begin To Recede In Minot, N.D.

Businesses are surrounded by floodwater as the Souris River crests as seen from the air on Sunday in Minot, North Dakota. The Souris River surpassed its 1881 record level of 1,558 feet above sea level and flooding estimated 4,000 homes in the city.
Scott Olson Getty Images

The Souris River is slowly retreating in Minot, N.D., where the river peaked early Sunday at levels not seen in more than a century. About 4,000 homes are flooded and a quarter of the town's 40-thousand residents are displaced.

There is a constant stream of dump trucks crossing the main bridge in downtown Minot. Construction crews continue to build, fill and shore up levees aimed at keeping what's left of the town dry.

The city's records date back to the late 1800s, and they show there's never been this much water coming through town.

Read more

12:01am

Fri June 24, 2011
Television

Spanish-Language Network Makes Daytime Emmy Bid

Actress Kate del Castillo in a publicity still for the Telemundo hit La Reina del Sur. The Spanish-language network is promoting the show for a Daytime Emmy nomination.
Telemundo

Nominations for this year's Primetime Emmys close Friday, and for weeks TV networks have been waging slick ad campaigns on behalf of their shows, actors and actresses. This year there's a newcomer to the Emmy campaign: Spanish-language network Telemundo, which is promoting its hit La Reina del Sur (The Queen of the South).

La Reina del Sur chronicles the life of a naive Mexican woman who falls in love with a drug lord and stumbles into becoming one of the world's most powerful traffickers.

Read more

12:01am

Thu June 16, 2011
Around the Nation

Feds Crack Down On Immigration Scam Artists

Federal authorities have launched a nationwide crack down on scam artists who prey on immigrants hoping to become U.S. citizens. Officials say the problem is growing.

Con artists promise to help illegal immigrants stay in the country legally but in the end leave, the people penniless and in more trouble with the immigration service.

Lots of friends told Guatemalan immigrant Catalina Alvarado to go see an immigration lawyer near her home in Hollywood, Calif. They told her he works magic and would get her a work permit and even a green card.

Read more

4:00am

Thu June 9, 2011
Around the Nation

Calif. Could Make The Dream Act A Reality

California could give state-funded financial aid to undocumented immigrants in college. The bill, called the California Dream Act, is working its way through the state legislature. Proponents say kids who came here illegally shouldn't be punished for their parents' decisions. Opponents say that California can't afford the benefit and that it will only lead to more illegal immigration.

4:00am

Wed June 1, 2011
Business

Obama Nominates Bryson For Commerce Secretary

John Bryson is the former chairman and chief executive of energy company Edison International. He also co-founded the Natural Resources Defense Council and served on a United Nations advisory group on energy and climate change.

4:00am

Wed May 18, 2011
Around the Nation

Vicksburg, Miss., Still Waiting For River To Crest

Hundreds of homes and thousands of acres of farmland remain underwater in Vicksburg, Mississippi. The high water is set to crest at the Mississippi river town tomorrow. But it will take weeks for the river to recede and much longer for residents and farmers to recoup their losses.

4:49pm

Sun May 15, 2011
Around the Nation

In Mississippi Town, Residents Watch Rising Waters

Thousands of homes and farms in Mississippi remain underwater, and residents are bracing for the river's crest later in the week.

Warren County Sheriff Martin Pace checks the depth meter on his small boat motoring through a flooded neighborhood in Vicksburg. The reading: 71/2 feet.

Pace and his deputies patrol this and other inundated parts of town, making sure looters stay out. He points to the top of street signs that stick out of the water: Mary's Alley and Williams Street.

Read more

4:00am

Thu May 5, 2011
Business

Warner Bros. To Buy Flixster

Warner Brothers has announced it is buying the popular movie site Flixster and its subsidiary Rotten Tomatoes. The movie studio is hoping the purchase will help it in its quest to rescue DVD sales and better compete against Netflix.

4:00am

Tue May 3, 2011
Osama Bin Laden Killed

Military Families Relieved Bin Laden's Dead

Transcript

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

Let's hear what some members of the military and their families are thinking about the death of Osama bin Laden. Some are feeling proud, others excited, others relieved, and still others worried. There's still a lot of concern about friends and loved ones in harm's way. NPR's Carrie Kahn reports.

CARRIE KAHN: It's a pretty typical day in Laura Crawford's house on the Camp Pendleton Marine Base just north of San Diego. She's just put her four year old son down for a nap and is now feeding her 15 month old twin girls.

Read more

Pages