NPR: Brian Naylor

After almost a decade spent reporting on Congress for NPR, Brian Naylor has turned his microphone toward the issues, people, and events of the Mid-Atlantic region. His coverage now encompasses developments in the area stretching from Pennsylvania through Virginia. In addition to his reports heard on NPR's Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition, Naylor can be heard as a substitute host on NPR's newsmagazines.

As NPR's congressional correspondent, Naylor documented the first Republican majority in Congress in 40 years, and filed many reports chronicling the 73-member year freshman class who, according to Naylor, were the driving force behind the revolution. Naylor was elected to the Executive Committee of the Congressional Radio/TV Gallery in 1995. His congressional work earned national praise; Naylor's stories were among those that won NPR the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia Journalism award presented for political reporting in 1996. Before becoming NPR's congressional correspondent, Naylor served as NPR's White House correspondent during the Reagan administration.

During his tenure at NPR, Naylor has also reported from abroad. He filed from London during the Gulf War and from Jerusalem in the aftermath of the Temple Mount shootings. He also covered the 1988 Olympics from Seoul. Naylor joined NPR in 1982 as a newscaster for All Things Considered. Before coming to NPR, Naylor served from 1979 to 1982 as State House/political reporter and anchor for WOSU-FM in Columbus, Ohio. Naylor has also worked at radio stations in Maine.

A native of Pound Ridge, NY, Naylor graduated from the University of Maine in 1978 with a bachelor's degree in broadcasting/film.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The upcoming presidential election will mark a surprising first. Yes, a woman will be on the ballot as a major party nominee. But in addition, for the first time ever, the Organization of American States is sending poll observers to watch as U.S. voting takes place.

The OAS, based in Washington, D.C., has previously observed elections in 26 of its 34 member nations, but never before in the United States. The mission will be led by former Costa Rican President Laura Chinchilla.

Updated at 5:05 p.m. ET

Former President Bill Clinton will take his wife's place at several campaign events in the next couple of days. Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton has been recovering from pneumonia at home after abruptly leaving a Sept. 11 commemoration ceremony in New York on Sunday, where her campaign said she became overheated and dehydrated.

Hillary Clinton was due to appear at fundraisers in California on Tuesday and make an appearance for a campaign event near Las Vegas on Wednesday, where her husband will now go instead.

Hillary Clinton's begrudging release of information related to her health on Sunday follows a pattern set by candidates and many who have won the Oval Office.

It is a pattern of secrecy and, in some cases, cover-ups that would be scandalous if they occurred on other issues of policy.

The Federal Communications Commission has seen the future of cable TV, and it looks like the apps on your smartphone.

Bernie Sanders is launching a new political organization. It's called Our Revolution. It aims to support candidates and, according to its website, "advance the progressive agenda that we believe in."

But the revolution is getting off to a rocky start.

Eight key staffers abruptly resigned over the weekend in a dispute over the group's leadership and legal structure.

Sanders himself is set to address followers on Wednesday at 8 p.m. ET for the launch of the group. You can watch that here:

One of the questions raised over the course of this year's presidential race is about how a President Trump would deal with Russian president Vladimir Putin.

One reason to wonder: the Republican Party platform's new language on policy towards Ukraine.

When Republican Party leaders drafted the platform prior to their convention in Cleveland last month, they had relatively little input from the campaign of then-presumptive nominee Donald Trump on most issues — except when it came to a future Republican administration's stance on Ukraine.

Now that the political conventions are over, its time to start thinking about the transition to the next president.

Yes, really.

As of August 1st, the federal government is making office space available to representatives of the Clinton and Trump campaigns to start making plans for taking over in January. If this seems a bit early, those who have been there say it's not.

"This is the most complicated takeover, not only on the planet, but in history," says Max Stier, President of the Partnership For Public Service.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit NPR.

Donald Trump is running for president as a Washington outsider. Yet to manage his campaign, he's picked someone who is very much a Washington insider. Paul Manafort has been a political operative and lobbyist for years, including for some controversial figures seeking to influence U.S. politics.

The Republican Party, as it prepares for its convention next week has checked off item No. 1 on its housekeeping list — drafting a party platform. The document reflects the conservative views of its authors, many of whom are party activists. So don't look for any concessions to changing views among the broader public on key social issues.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

There are some big companies out there that you've probably never heard of, that know more about you than you can imagine.

They're called data brokers, and they collect all sorts of information — names, addresses, income, where you go on the Internet and who you connect with online. That information is then sold to other companies. There are few regulations governing these brokers.

The global economy is "here" and "done," President Obama said Wednesday — the question now is under what terms it will be shaped.

Obama spoke at a news conference that was dominated by questions about global trade, the effects of Brexit, and Donald Trump. It followed a summit meeting with the leaders of Canada and Mexico in Ottawa.

The House Benghazi Committee has released its findings on the Sept. 11, 2012, attack on the U.S. diplomatic compound in Libya.

The 800-page report found that despite President Obama and then Defense Secretary Leon Panetta's "clear orders," the military failed to immediately send a force to Benghazi and that nothing was en route to Libya at the time the last two Americans were killed — almost eight hours after the attacks began.

The Orlando shooter, Omar Mateen, claimed allegiance to the leader of the Islamic State during a phone call to 911 early Sunday. And that's reignited a debate over how to label the ideology that apparently inspired the attack.

Republican Donald Trump and many on the right say it's "radical Islam." But Democrat Hillary Clinton used a different term: "radical Islamism." It's not just a debate over semantics.

Updated at 12:44 p.m. ET

President Obama met with Bernie Sanders on Thursday morning at the White House. Now that Hillary Clinton has clinched the Democratic nomination, the question on the minds of many Democrats is when the Vermont senator will give up his fight for the party's presidential nomination.

This week marks a year since the government first revealed that hackers had stolen personnel files of some 4 million current and former federal employees.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

The head of the beleaguered Transportation Security Administration told lawmakers on Capitol Hill Wednesday the long passenger lines at screening checkpoints at Chicago's O'Hare International Airport this month should have been avoided. He also said it was a "failure" on the part of the agency to get some things done.

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

FBI Director James Comey says he is closely watching the bureau's investigation of Hillary Clinton's emails "to make sure it's being done well."

Comey says he feels "pressure" to do the investigation well and promptly, adding that "between those two things we will always choose well."

Ahead of the potentially pivotal Indiana primary Tuesday, Indiana Gov. Mike Pence announced he will be voting for Republican candidate Ted Cruz.

"This is a time for choosing," Pence said on WIBC radio in Indianapolis. He called Cruz, a senator from Texas, a "principled conservative" who "stood up for taxpayers" in fighting spending in Washington, said he was "very impressed" with his "knowledge and devotion" to the Constitution and his "strong, unwavering stand" against abortion rights.

President Obama is throwing his weight behind a plan that would lead to competition in the market for set-top cable and satellite TV boxes. Most viewers now rent the boxes from their TV providers. The Federal Communications Commission wants to make it easier for viewers to buy the devices.

Donald Trump said women who undergo abortions should be punished if the procedure is made illegal. In an interview for a town hall meeting to air on MSNBC Wednesday night, Trump said "there has to be some form of punishment" for women.

While most Republican officeholders and candidates oppose abortion rights, few have publicly stated positions on whether there should be legal penalties for women who have abortions. Most believe it is the physicians who perform them who should be prosecuted.

Calling Donald Trump "the only candidate who actually threatens the established powers that have betrayed this county," the National Border Patrol Council endorsed the New York businessman for president on Wednesday.

Police in Jupiter, Fla. have charged Donald Trump's campaign manager with battery for allegedly grabbing a reporter for Breitbart news following a Trump campaign rally earlier this month.

Corey Lewandowski is charged with one count of simple battery.

Donald Trump has set his sights on a new target for litigation: the Republican Party. He is threatening to sue the Republican National Committee over delegate allocations in Louisiana. Trump defeated Texas Sen. Ted Cruz in Louisiana's March 5 primary, but Cruz may receive up to 10 more delegates from the state than Trump.

Trump defeated Cruz by 3.6 percentage points in Louisiana. But because the results were relatively close, each candidate was awarded 18 delegates.

Donald Trump has said on several occasions that he wants to, as he puts it, "open up" libel laws, so that he can sue news organizations he believes have written what he calls "hit pieces."

Libel laws now make it extremely difficult for public figures to sue for damages. Still, a President Trump would very likely have a hard time changing them.

When President Obama heads to Havana later this month he is expected to take in a baseball game featuring the Cuban national team against the visiting Tampa Bay Rays. Cuba has long been a hotbed of the sport and more than a dozen Cuban-born players are now on major league rosters. That number could grow by a lot and soon, if Major League Baseball has its way.

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