Lourdes Garcia-Navarro

NPR correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro is most at home when she's on the move. Born in London, the journalist has lived in the United States, Colombia, Afghanistan, Israel and Mexico City. She currently covers the Middle East for NPR, and is based in Jerusalem.

After covering Iraq as NPR News' Baghdad Bureau Chief since February 2008, Garcia-Navarro made another move: relocating to Israel in April 2009 to become NPR's correspondent based in Jerusalem.

Prior to reporting from Baghdad, Garcia-Navarro spent three years as NPR's foreign correspondent in Mexico City, reporting from that region as well as on special assignments abroad. Her depth of reporting brought an insider's cultivated perspective to a territory that also embraces her family's roots (incidentally, her parents are from the region).

Garcia-Navarro got her start in journalism as a freelancer with the BBC World Service and Voice of America, reporting from Cuba, Syria, Panama and Europe. She later became a producer for Associated Press Television News (APTN) before transitioning to AP Radio. While there, Garcia-Navarro covered post-Sept. 11 events in Afghanistan and developments in Jerusalem. From 2002 to 2004, she was based in Iraq.

Why journalism? Garcia-Navarro says that she likes "to tell people's stories, to make their lives real and vivid," adding that it's "an important job and I love doing it."

Garcia-Navarro holds a B.S. in International Relations from Georgetown University and an M.A. in journalism from City University in London. She was the recipient of the Daniel Schorr Journalism Prize in 2006 for a two-part series "Migrants' Job Search Empties Mexican Community," and also shared in two awards honoring NPR News' Iraq reporting: a Peabody Award in 2005, and a 2007 Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton Award.

Pages

4:00am

Wed September 21, 2011
Middle East

Middle East Abuzz With Talk Of Statehood Bid

The uncertainty surrounding the Palestinian's bid for statehood has kicked up mixed feelings in the West Bank and Israel. Far away from the posturing and news stories, ordinary Palestinians and Israelis have their own thoughts on the idea.

5:21pm

Thu September 15, 2011
Middle East

Changing Middle East Leaves Israel Feeling Isolated

Egyptian soldiers guard the badly damaged entrance of the Israeli Embassy in Cairo, Egypt on Sunday. Protesters stormed the embassy, contributing to the worst diplomatic crisis between the two countries since they signed a peace treaty in 1979.
Nasser Nasser AP

Turkish leader Recep Tayyip Erdogan would seem to be an unlikely icon for the Palestinians. Yet he is all the rage these days in the Palestinian territories. His picture is everywhere, even in places you would never expect it.

"All your receipts, all your notepads, everything has the picture of Erdogan," says Abdul Rahman Marra, a grocery store owner in the West Bank.

Mara then gestures to the posters of Erdogan on the walls. The Turkish leader stood up to Israel and defended Palestinian rights, Marra says, calling Erdogan the best leader in the Muslim world.

Read more

4:51pm

Wed August 31, 2011
Conflict In Libya

In Tripoli, Celebrating More Than Ramadan's End

Muslims gather at Martyr's Square in Tripoli for Eid prayers Wednesday. Despite joy over the rebel takeover of the city, residents still face water and electricity shortages and high food prices.
Daniel Berehulak Getty Images

The Muslim holiday of Eid al-Fitr is always a time of joyous celebration in the Islamic world. The holiday's arrival means that Ramadan, the long month of daytime fasting, is over, and friends and family gather to exchange gifts and share meals.

As it began Wednesday in Tripoli, the holiday carried even greater resonance this year because of the rebel takeover of the Libyan capital.

"It's the big Eid this year," says resident Alaa al-Najaa. "In my life, I haven't seen the people before like that, especially the children."

Read more

4:00am

Mon August 29, 2011
Africa

Libyan Loyalists Keep Fighting For Moammar Gadhafi's Regime

In Libya, the tide has turned against Moammar Gadhafi and his supporters. And that has left an uncomfortable question for the new rebel authority: What to do with his loyalists and supporters?

5:22pm

Fri August 26, 2011
NPR Story

Looking Into Libya's Most Notorious Prison

One of Moammar Gadhafi's last major strongholds in Tripoli has fallen to rebel forces. Among the survivors of the ferocious street fighting are prisoners from the Abu Salim prison, some of whom have been jailed for more than two decades.

5:59pm

Wed August 24, 2011
Conflict In Libya

Libyan Rebels Struggle To Impose Order On Tripoli

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:30 am

Libyan rebels remove the green flags from poles at the Abu Salim square in Tripoli on Aug. 26 after the opposition forces announced the transfer of their leadership to the capital.
Patrick Baz AFP/Getty Images

Packed into cars and pickup trucks, Libya's rebels honked their horns and fired into the air as they paraded through Tripoli's central square on Wednesday in a show of force and celebration.

Some fighters deliberately targeted the ancient stone walls of the old city that flank the square — apparently because Moammar Gadhafi used the ramparts as a podium while giving speeches. And everyone is now calling it Martyrs Square, rather than Green Square, which was Gadhafi's term.

Read more

4:00am

Wed August 24, 2011
Africa

Gadhafi Vows To Fight On Against Libyan Rebels

The regime of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi continues to crumble. On Tuesday, rebels stormed Gadhafi's compound in the center of the capital Tripoli.

5:51pm

Mon August 22, 2011
Africa

The Scene In Tripoli: Rebels, Snipers, Chaos

Rebel fighters drive through western Tripoli, Libya, on Monday. Large numbers of rebels have entered the capital, but Moammar Gadhafi's loyalists are putting up stiff resistance.
Sean Carberry NPR

The Libyan rebels may have stormed into Tripoli on a wave of euphoria Sunday. But they were watchful and deliberate Monday as they realized that Moammar Gadhafi's armed loyalists were still a dangerous presence in many parts of the Libyan capital.

In one contested area, a rebel with a megaphone shouted warnings to his comrades: "Be careful of snipers. The city is not clear yet. Be alert."

But most rebels didn't need to be told. They were already jumpy coming into Tripoli, the grand prize in the rebels' six-month uprising against Gadhafi and his 42 years of rule.

Read more

3:00pm

Mon August 22, 2011
Africa

Libyan Rebels Claim Control Of Most Of Tripoli

After easy advance into the Libya capital of Tripoli Sunday, rebels are encountering resistance inside the city, especially around the barracks that are Moammar Gadhafi's official residential compound.

4:00am

Mon August 22, 2011
Africa

Libyan Rebels Sweep Into Tripoli

It appears to be just a matter of time before the rebels take complete control of the capital. There are reports of heavy fighting near Moammar Gadhafi's compound but there is no sign of Gadhafi.

5:53pm

Fri August 19, 2011
Africa

Libyan Rebels Celebrate Takeover Of Another Key City

Two Libyan rebel fighters battle with snipers holed up in a hotel at the main square of Zawiya, a city 30 miles west of Tripoli, on Aug. 18. The rebels entered the key coastal city this week.
Marc Hofer AFP/Getty Images

The Libyan rebels have been on the move this week.

In Gheryan, an important city south of the capital Tripoli, it seemed everyone was celebrating Friday. Women, children, young men, older men and even white-haired grandfathers.

They jumped into trucks and cars and flashed the victory sign to each other in an impromptu parade. The city, which straddles the main road south from Tripoli, was a garrison for Moammar Gadhafi's forces for the past six months. From Gheryan, the military would resupply forces for the frequent battles in the country's Western Mountains.

Read more

4:00am

Fri August 19, 2011
Africa

Libyan Rebels Keep Momentum Up In Zawiyah Battle

In Libya, rebel forces have made advances in their battle to unseat Moamar Gadhafi from power. After several days of fierce clashes, opposition fighters have taken the last refinery under Gadhafi's control. The coastal city of Zawiyah, 30 miles from the capital tripoli, is still being contested though.

5:43pm

Wed August 17, 2011
Conflict In Libya

As Libyan Rebels Advance, Civilians Flee The Coast

A Libyan rebel prays with his weapons in the coastal town of Zawiya, 30 miles west of Tripoli, Libya, on Aug. 16. The rebels have entered many parts of the town, but Moammar Gadhafi's forces are battling to prevent a full rebel takeover.
Giulio Petrocco AP

After weeks with little movement on the battlefield, the dynamic of the Libyan war has changed.

As the rebels came charging down from the Western Mountains and pushed into the important coastal town of Zawiya, they are no longer the ones who appear vulnerable.

Increasingly, Moammar Gadhafi's strongholds, including the capital Tripoli, appear isolated.

Read more

4:42pm

Thu August 11, 2011
Conflict In Libya

In Libya, A Father And Son's Brief War

Mabruk Eshnuk (left) and his son Malik left their home in Pittsburgh to volunteer and fight with rebels in western Libya's Nafusa Mountains.
Ayman Oghanna for NPR

About a month ago, I met Mabruk and Malik Eshnuk, a father and son who had traveled from Pittsburgh to western Libya to help rebels battling forces loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi.

The family originally hails from the Libyan coastal city of Zawiya, but left years ago.

Mabruk and Malik were filled with optimism when I spoke to them. Mabruk, the father, had a ready smile and a voluble manner — he spoke so quickly it was often hard to follow him.

Read more

6:42am

Wed August 10, 2011
Africa

Libya's Defacto Government Is Being Reorganized

In Libya's rebel east, the defacto government has been disbanded in reaction to the killing of the rebel army chief of staff. It's the latest sign of political disarray and divisions in the rebel camp. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports.

3:25pm

Wed August 3, 2011
Conflict In Libya

Rebel Leader's Death Puts Eastern Libya On Edge

Originally published on Thu August 11, 2011 1:07 pm

Libyans shout slogans at a rally in rebel-held Benghazi, in eastern Libya on July 31. The rally was held to pay respect to Abdel-Fattah Younis, the Libyan rebels' slain military chief. Now, his family, tribesmen and supporters are demanding answers from the rebel authorities about his death.
Sergey Ponomarev AP

In eastern Libya, the rebel stronghold of Benghazi is filled with tension following the murder last week of the rebels' top military commander.

Abdel-Fattah Younis was killed in mysterious circumstances. Now, members of his family and his tribe — one of the most powerful in Libya — are accusing the rebel authorities of dragging its feet in the investigation.

Read more

12:52pm

Tue August 2, 2011
Conflict In Libya

Libyan Rebels Wage 'Mad Max' War In The Mountains

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:36 am

A Libyan rebel poses with his antique bolt-action rifle.
Jonathan Levinson for NPR

The sleepy towns in the Western Mountains of Libya come to life right before the country's rebels engage in a fight with the forces loyal to Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi. The mostly deserted roads suddenly fill with pickup trucks. The rebel fighters bristle with the makeshift weapons that they rely on. The vehicles, some monster trucks, then peel off into the front lines deep in the desert, covered in dried mud that serves as camouflage.

Read more

8:00am

Sun July 31, 2011
Africa

Ramadan Arrives In Rebel-Held Libya

There are clashes going on in the eastern rebel city of Benghazi, yet on the streets of the city, people are preparing for the holy month of Ramadan. NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro reports from Libya on the eve of the Ramada fast.

2:01pm

Wed July 20, 2011
Conflict In Libya

Rebels In Western Libya Train For Move On Tripoli

Specially selected rebel fighters march through the streets of Zintan, Libya. These rebels will be trained in urban combat in anticipation of an expected move toward Tripoli.
Jonathan Levinson for NPR

Rebel commanders in the western mountains of Libya say they are supplying anti-government forces in Tripoli with weapons in advance of a march on the capital.

Claims like this have been made before, and there are still few signs that the rebels can take Moammar Gadhafi's stronghold city. Still, interviews with Tripoli residents who have fled to the western mountains in recent days suggest that Gadhafi's hold on the capital may be weakening.

Preparing For Urban Combat

Read more

12:01am

Tue July 19, 2011
Conflict In Libya

For Libyan Rebels, Gadhafi's Mines A Potent Obstacle

Milad Saadi clears the dirt around a brick of plastic explosive that he discovered lying on top of a T-AB-1 anti-personnel mine.
Jonathan Levinson for NPR

Land mines are being increasingly used in Libya by Moammar Gadhafi's forces in battlegrounds across the country. Rebels fighting for the eastern town of Brega are being stymied by minefields around the area.

In Libya's western mountains, anti-tank and anti-personnel mines are causing many casualties, but there are few mine experts to help.

On the barren front line in the village of Gualish, rebels take cover from Gadhafi forces (and the relentless sun) behind a sand berm.

Read more

6:22am

Thu July 14, 2011
Africa

Libyan Rebels Fight To Maintain Control Of Gualish

There's been more fighting in western Libya as forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi moved to retake control of a village that fell to rebel fighters earlier this week. As news of the latest attack spread, young rebels in the mountain town of Zintan jumped into cars and trucks heading to the front. Civilians fled in the other direction to escape the bombardment.

4:00am

Tue July 12, 2011
Africa

Rebels In Libya's Western Mountains Face Shortages

Libyan rebels gather at the front line on the eastern ridge of the Nafusah Mountains in Western Libya on Sunday.
Marco Longari AFP/Getty Images

Rebels in the Nafusa Mountains of western Libya have made substantial gains in recent weeks against forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi. But the fighting has prompted a growing humanitarian crisis in this isolated region southwest of Tripoli.

Fighting across Libya has been characterized by a lack of sophisticated weapons. Pointing to a rusted rifle, a fighter on the front line of a recent battle in the mountains said it's "more than 100 years" old. "Our grandfathers before us use it in front of Italian army in 1911," he said.

Read more

8:00am

Sat July 2, 2011
Africa

Morocco Votes To Curb The King

Moroccans have voted in favor of a series of constitutional reforms that will limit the powers held by their king. Host Scott Simon gets the details from NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro in Casablanca.

3:00pm

Fri July 1, 2011
Africa

Morocco Votes On Political Reforms Referendum

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, host:

Morocco's government says voters there have overwhelmingly passed a series of constitutional reforms which will set new limits on the power of the monarchy. The landslide result was widely expected. As we reported, the reforms would keep Morocco's king as the head of state and ]the military, but the head of government would be a prime minister chosen from the largest party elected to the parliament. Members of the opposition say the changes don't go far enough and are vowing to continue their protests.

Read more

9:40am

Wed June 29, 2011
Middle East

Israel Vows To Block Flotilla From Reaching Gaza

A store owner in a Gaza City market. Israel has eased the blockade of Gaza over the past year, and more commercial goods are reaching the territory.
Jonathan Levinson for NPR

Activists in a small flotilla of vessels are set to again challenge Israel's maritime blockade of the Gaza Strip, just a year after a similar attempt led to a deadly confrontation in the Mediterranean.

Eight ships and 300 activists — many of them from the U.S. — plan to set sail this week from Greece. They say they're trying to deliver humanitarian aid to the coastal territory and highlight the plight of the 1.5 million Palestinians who live there.

Read more

12:01am

Thu June 23, 2011
Middle East

In West Bank, Palestinian Accord Faces Challenges

A voter casts his ballot to elect the board of the largest private medical association in the West Bank city of Hebron. Out of 14 people running, seven are backed by Fatah. There isn't a single candidate running under the Hamas banner.
Jonathan Levinson For NPR

A newly minted peace deal between rival Palestinian factions is already fraying. Fatah, which rules the West Bank, and the militant group Hamas, which holds sway in Gaza, have been at odds since a civil war broke out in Gaza in 2007.

Last month, the groups signed a reconciliation agreement. The two factions were supposed to announce the composition of a unity government in Cairo this week, but the meeting was postponed following disagreements over who should assume the post of prime minister.

A Microcosmic Election?

Read more

4:31pm

Tue June 21, 2011
Middle East

Palestinians Plan Trappings Of A State Before U.N. Bid

Palestinian artist Khaled Jarrar (left) has been stamping passports in advance of a possible Palestinian bid for recognition at the United Nations in September. His stamp is not a valid passport mark, but a statement in support of U.N. bid. Here, he stamps a tourist's passport at the Ramallah central bus station.
Jonathan Levinson For NPR

Peace talks between Israelis and Palestinians are at a standstill. Palestinians say they will now take their drive for statehood to the United Nations this September.

Israel says the move violates previous agreements and is a dangerous act of unilateralism.

But on the ground, Palestinians say some of the trappings of a state are being put in place.

Using A Stamp To Send A Message

Read more

4:00am

Mon May 9, 2011
Africa

Misrata Profile

NPR's Lourdes Garcia-Navarro profiles a council member in rebel-held Misrata, Libya. The man's father was killed recently in shelling. And, rockets keep his daughter up at night. But he says trying to establish a new government is his most important work.

3:46pm

Thu May 5, 2011
Conflict In Libya

In Libya, An Eerie Quiet On The Eastern Front

In Libya, fighting is still raging around the besieged western city of Misrata. It's also strong near the Tunisian border, where the rebel-held town of Zintan is under attack by forces loyal to Moammar Gadhafi.

But one area that has been out of the headlines recently is in the east — where the battle lines are static and neither the rebels nor Gadhafi's forces can advance.

Read more

12:01am

Thu May 5, 2011
Conflict In Libya

Fear Rules Benghazi Amid Unexplained Shots, Blasts

Originally published on Thu May 5, 2011 8:45 pm

A Libyan rebel fires into the air while taking part in a military parade in Benghazi. Optimism in the rebel stronghold has turned to fear for some, as the crackle of shooting — celebratory, or to settle a score — has become a constant in the city.
Nasser Nasser AP

As the Libyan civil war drags on, optimism in the rebel camp for the speedy overthrow of Moammar Gadhafi has disappeared. The rebel stronghold of Benghazi is now in the grips of a different emotion — fear.

A rebel fighter's car blew up this week at a funeral. Across town, explosions and shootings are ripping through a neighborhood, but no one is exactly sure what the cause is. Families are hiding in their homes, afraid of the lawless streets.

Awad Mohammed was at his father's funeral when an explosion happened. It was crowded, and there were many mourners.

Read more

Pages