Lindsey Smith

The water crisis in Flint, Mich., didn't start a year ago. For almost two years, officials told residents the water was fine when it wasn't.

Later the officials told residents to drink filtered water — unless you're a baby or pregnant — in that case drink only bottled water.

Then they said tap water is safe for everybody, as long as you have a filter.

But now lots of people in Flint don't believe anything officials tell them.

"Don't drink the city water. Don't drink Flint water, period," says Jennice Badon says, who lives in the city.

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Transcript

ARI SHAPIRO, HOST:

Copyright 2017 Michigan Radio. To see more, visit Michigan Radio.

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The Palisades nuclear power plant in Michigan had five unplanned shutdowns last year. It's one of the area's biggest employers, and its safety record is one of the worst in the country. Now it's trying to prove to federal regulators that it can meet their standards.

On the shores of Lake Michigan, the Palisades Power Plant is tucked in between tall sand dunes in Covert Township, Mich., at the southern edge of Van Buren State Park.

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Last June, the city council in Holland, Mich., voted against adding sexual orientation and gender identity to its local anti-discrimination laws. Now an unlikely coalition is pressuring the city council to change that vote.

On Wednesday nights, Pastor Bill Freeman turns the podium of the city council meeting into a pulpit. He wants Holland to adopt local laws that would protect people from getting fired or kicked out of their homes because they are gay, bisexual or transgender.

Manufacturers are still cautious when it comes to hiring. But one Michigan company is going on a hiring spree. Gentex Corporation mostly makes car mirrors. Michigan Radio's Lindsey Smith reports that business is booming.

One year after an oil spill, workers are still cleaning up the bottom of the Kalamazoo River in southern Michigan. An estimated 840,000 gallons leaked from a broken pipeline owned by Enbridge Energy. Life for those living near the accident site in Michigan has not returned to normal yet, and it probably won't for some time.

The recession forced many small manufacturers to adapt to survive, especially in the industrial Midwest. In Michigan, a yacht-building company started a new venture in the wind-energy industry to keep its factory open.

In 2005 and 2006, Tiara Yachts was operating at full capacity, turning out about 400 yachts per year, with most of them going for around $1 million each. To keep up with demand, the company nearly doubled its manufacturing space in Holland, Mich.

A Fateful Decision To Expand