Julie McCarthy

Julie McCarthy has traveled the world as a foreign correspondent for NPR, heading NPR's Tokyo bureau, reporting from Europe, Africa and the Middle East, and covering the news and issues of South America. In April 2009, McCarthy moved to Islamabad to open NPR's first permanent bureau in Pakistan.

Before moving to Islamabad, McCarthy was NPR's South America correspondent based in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. McCarthy covered the Middle East for NPR from 2002 to 2005, when she was dispatched to report on the Israeli incursion into the West Bank.

Previously, McCarthy was the London Bureau Chief for NPR, a position that frequently took her far from her post to cover stories that span the globe. She spent five weeks in Iran during the war in Afghanistan, covered the re-election of Robert Mugabe in Zimbabwe, and traveled to the Indian island nation of Madagascar to report on the political and ecological developments there. Following the terror attacks on the United States, McCarthy was the lead reporter assigned to investigate al Qaeda in Europe.

In 1994, McCarthy became the first staff correspondent to head NPR's Tokyo bureau. She covered a range of stories in Japan with distinction, including the Kobe earthquake of 1995, the 50th anniversary of the atomic bombing of Hiroshima, and the turmoil over U.S. troops on Okinawa. Her coverage of Japan won the East-West Center's Mary Morgan Hewett Award for the Advancement of Journalism.

McCarthy has also traveled extensively throughout Asia. Her coverage of the Asian economic crisis earned her the 1998 Overseas Press Club of America Award. She arrived in Indonesia weeks before the fall of Asia's longest-running ruler and chronicled a nation in chaos as President Suharto stepped from power.

Prior to her assignment in Asia, McCarthy was the foreign editor for Europe and Africa. She served as the Senior Washington Editor during the Persian Gulf War; NPR was honored with a Silver Baton in the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Awards for its coverage of that conflict. McCarthy was awarded a Peabody, two additional Overseas Press Club Awards and the Ohio State Award in her capacity as European and African Editor.

McCarthy was selected to spend the 2002-2003 academic year at Stanford University, winning a place in the Knight Journalism Fellowship Program. In 1994, she was a Jefferson Fellow at the East-West Center in Hawaii in 1994

The Trump Organization has more interests in India — at least five — than anywhere else outside North America. With an ever-increasing taste for luxury, India offers the Trump brand a lucrative market, no matter who runs the company after President-elect Donald Trump separates from his global enterprises, as he's said he would do. While Mumbai real estate prices average $1,000 per square foot for exclusive living, a four-hour drive away, past billboards beckoning the newly moneyed with images...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. RACHEL MARTIN, HOST: President-elect Donald Trump has suggested he will be leaving his business to avoid any conflict of interest arising from his global enterprises. But no matter who heads up the family firm, it is likely to reap benefits. NPR's Julie McCarthy has been looking into Trump's economic interests in India and what the future president and property developers there stand to gain and lose. JULIE MCCARTHY, BYLINE: On a...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. DAVID GREENE, HOST: In India, a nationwide cash crunch has brought economic life in streets and villages to a virtual standstill. This is because last week, the government of Prime Minister Narendra Modi invalidated 500 and 1,000 rupee banknotes. These are the country's largest. NPR's Julie McCarthy is on the line from New Delhi. Julie, good morning. JULIE MCCARTHY, BYLINE: Good morning. GREENE: Now, let me get this straight....

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Gautam Lewis has had the sort of life that could spring from the pages of a fairy tale. Afflicted with polio at 18 months, he was taken in by Mother Teresa when he was 3. He doesn't know all the details of how he came to live at her Home for Children in Kolkata, but he does speak of the courage his family must have had to give him up. At age 7, he was adopted by Patricia Lewis , who had first met him when she was a physics Ph.D. student volunteering in Kolkata. She is now one of Britain's...

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A steady rain falls on velvet green terraces, releasing a powerful scent of newly harvested tea. A ripple of voices tumbles down the hillside as a man barks orders. The tea pickers, all women, many in bare feet, expertly navigate the leech-infested slopes. Balancing hampers on their backs loaded with freshly plucked tea leaves, they descend for their morning tea break. It could be a scene out of the 19th century, when the estates of the southern Indian state of Kerala were first cultivated on...

The move has sent shockwaves across India's financial sector: Raghuram Rajan, the governor of India's Reserve Bank who's been buffeted by political attacks, announced that he will be leaving. The 53-year old economist had said he was open to a second term, but will instead be returning to academia in the United States when his three-year tenure is up in September. There has been intense speculation about whether Rajan, who had been appointed Reserve Bank chief by the previous government,...

With near universal literacy and long life expectancy, the small Indian state of Kerala is a model for the rest of India. In recent weeks, however, the small state tucked at the bottom of the country has been in the spotlight for what its glowing human development indicators do not reveal. It sometimes takes an awful event to uncover maladies beneath the surface, and here, it was the savage murder of an underprivileged law student. Monsoon rains pour down on the shack where 29-year-old...

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Tukaram Jadhav was barely surviving off of his tiny cotton farm when he killed himself last September. His widow, a petite mother of two, pulls her purple sari tightly around her, and says she discovered her husband as he lay dying. "I was the one who found him. I was sleeping and woke up to the powerful smell of pesticides that we use to farm," Bhagyashree Jadhav says. She says she thought there had been a spill. "I asked my husband if he smelled it, then I realized he couldn't speak. He'd...

A fire crackles along the banks of the Yamuna River: a cremation of a young mother, struck by a car while she was fetching water. The stench of the river engulfs the sad assembly. Before the hissing funeral pyre, floating down the river, white blocks of what looks like detergent appear like icebergs. It is 95 degrees in Delhi this night. This is chemical waste from factories that have sprung up across the city, manufacturing leather goods, dyes and other goods. Downstream, the living reside...

Early morning light filters into the cavernous gymnasium as Neetu lunges, climbs and contorts her body into impossible positions. She shimmies up a thick rope that dangles from the two-story ceiling, her heavily muscled arms propelling her upward. She races through calisthenics with 25 other young women in the boot camp atmosphere of Chhotu Ram Stadium and Wrestling Center, in the Indian state of Haryana, known for its wrestling tradition. The grueling twice-a-day practice– 4 hours in the...

Vijay Mallya is one of India's most flamboyant business figures, known as a liquor baron, an airline owner, and a man who reportedly owns 250 vintage cars. But Mallya, 60, is now known as a debtor who is being pursued by banks to recover the mountain of debt he has accrued. He left the country on March 2, just as some 17 banks were closing in on him for payment of delinquent loans totaling the equivalent of nearly $1.5 billion. He now faces criminal investigations and the possibility of an...

The local media are calling it the "Robin Hood" budget. The government of Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi, eager to win support among the urban and rural poor, is announcing programs to improve conditions for low-income people and provide tax breaks for necessities and items that might improve their lives. Meanwhile, to bring in more funds for government spending, there are now higher taxes for luxury items. Farmers in particular are getting a helping hand — and that's a smart political...

Copyright 2016 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript DAVID GREENE, HOST: This past week, some 10 million people in one of the world largest cities, New Delhi, saw their water taps go dry. Many schools and businesses were closed and the government was forced to truck water into the city. India's capital receives much of its water from a canal which was damaged by rioters. Water is expected to be restored soon, but the underlying cause of all of this is still a major concern....

India has deployed thousands of army and paramilitary troops to quell violence that authorities say has killed at least 10 people in the northern Indian state of Haryana. A caste known as the Jats is leading the unrest to demand affirmative-action benefits from the government. Jats make up more than a quarter of Haryana's 25 million people. They seek to be included in the official category of "Other Backward Classes." Under India's constitution, the government is obligated to promote the...

In India, a university student is accused of uttering anti-India slogans that valorized a Kashmiri separatist. Is such sloganeering in support of Afzal Guru, who was hanged for his role in an attack on the Indian Parliament, a case of free speech or sedition? Indians are sharply divided. This past week, debate over the charge of sedition leveled against Jawaharlal Nehru University student leader Kanhaiya Kumar drew mobs to the courthouse and demonstrators to the streets. The offense of...

In a far-reaching ruling , India has prohibited telecom service providers from charging different prices to consumers to access content on the Internet — a blow to Facebook and its aggressive bid to offer a free but stripped-down version of the Internet aimed at India's poor. The decision this week endorsed the principle of net neutrality, which holds that the Web is open and prioritizes no service over another. India's Telecom Regulatory Authority in effect says that "discriminatory" pricing...

India and France have signed a "memorandum of understanding" on the sale of 36 French fighter jets to New Delhi. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi said financial details of the agreement to buy the Rafale jets, manufactured by Dassault Aviation, have yet to be sorted but will soon be finalized. Reporting from New Delhi, NPR's Julie McCarthy says the defense deal was one of a number of pacts reached during extensive talks between Modi and French President Francois Hollande, who is on a three...

Climate negotiators in Paris are wrangling over "country commitments," "caps" and "cuts" in greenhouse gases. Some environmentalists, however, argue that the most important "c" word is missing: consumption. In India, they say little will change unless fossil-fuel-reliant rich countries moderate how they consume energy. "An inconvenient truth is that we do not want to talk about consumption or lifestyle," says environmentalist Sunita Narain . The lifestyle of many Indians creates a relatively...

Conjuring images of a dystopia, the shroud of bad air blanketing New Delhi in recent weeks has intensified global pressure on India to curb its greenhouse gas emissions. India will arrive at the climate change summit in Paris next week as the third biggest generator of fossil fuel pollution blamed for warming the planet, after China and the U.S. Half of India's emissions come from burning coal. A visit to the coal-rich northeastern Indian state of Jharkhand reveals how this stands to get even...

In India, Prime Minister Narendra Modi's ruling Bharatiya Janata Party suffered a convincing defeat in a crucial state election that was seen as a referendum on Modi's leadership. Results are still being counted in the state of Bihar, but the BJP has conceded to the projected winner, Nitish Kumar, an anti-Modi stalwart and the sitting chief minister, a post akin to a U.S. governor. Public opinion surveys suggested that Modi's BJP was poised for triumph, but Kumar upended expectations and...

The Missionaries of Charity founded by Mother Teresa says it has shut down its adoption services in India over religious objections to the country's new adoption rules. The Catholic sisters known for their blue and white habits and vow of free service to the poor say they have asked the government to de-register 13 orphanages. The secretary of India's central adoption agency, Veerendra Mishra, told The Indian Express newspaper that there were two points of dispute: "First, [Missionaries of...

The world's third-largest carbon polluter has submitted its long-range plan to curb greenhouse gas admissions in advance of December's Paris climate summit . India does not commit to an absolute reduction in carbon emissions, but does promise to ramp up renewable energy to help slow global warming. In Delhi, the biggest form of pollution comes out of tailpipes. Eight million cars, trucks, buses and three-wheeled motorized rickshaws all belch carbon monoxide, hydrocarbons and dangerous...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript STEVE INSKEEP, HOST: India says it has a plan to cut back on the gases linked to global warming, which makes India the latest country to step up. India's pledge comes before a global conference on climate change in Paris this December. The conference is framed as a final chance to put the world on a more sustainable path. NPR's Julie McCarthy is covering this story from New Delhi. Hi, Julie. JULIE MCCARTHY, BYLINE: Hi....

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript ARI SHAPIRO, HOST: Just days after China's President Xi Jinping held high-profile business meetings on the West Coast, now it's India's turn. Prime Minister Narendra Modi flies to California this weekend to court and be courted by America's tech industry leaders. NPR's South Asia correspondent, Julie McCarthy, reports. JULIE MCCARTHY, BYLINE: In his second visit to the United States, India's social media-savvy prime...

Jawaharlal Nehru towered over 20th century India — a thinker, a statesman, the heir to Mahatma Gandhi. As one of the founding fathers of modern India, Nehru oversaw his country's transition from a British colony to a democracy, and announced the birth in 1947 of a free India. In the capital, the Nehru Memorial Museum and Library honors the man's legacy. Depending on where you stand, new plans by the government to modernize the museum fall somewhere between an apostasy that dilutes the great...

The Indian government is seeking $99 million in damages from Swiss food and beverage giant Nestle over a recent food scare involving the Maggi brand of instant noodles that are a household staple in India. The class action, filed late Tuesday before India's National Consumer Disputes Redressal Commission, accuses Nestle of "gross negligence, apathy and callousness." The government had ordered the popular snack cleared from the country's shelves in June, after India's food and safety...

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/. Transcript MELISSA BLOCK, HOST: In Bangladesh today, another well-known secular blogger was murdered. This is the fourth such killing this year. Police say the 40-year-old activist was hacked to death by assailants in his home in the capital Dhaka. NPR's Julie McCarthy has more. JULIE MCCARTHY, BYLINE: Four to five unidentified men entered blogger Niloy Chakrabarti Neel's fifth floor apartment following Friday prayers, according to...

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