John Hingsbergen

Associate Manager/Program Director

Ways To Connect

Transmitter problems that developed over the weekend have taken 90.9 FM WEKH off the air. 


Engineers are working on diagnosing the problem and getting the station back on the air.

The shooting of nine people worshiping in a church in Charleston, South Carolina causes us to ask, what does it mean to us? 


Dr. Jimmy Kirby, Th D, expert on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr and scholar focusing on Christian Education and Social Ethics;

Rev. Marsha Moors-Charles, Pastor of Bluegrass United Church of Christ, Lexington; 

Kentucky Filmmaker Jason Epperson has produced a documentary focusing on UK Basketball fandom. Meanwhile, there are many other film projects underway in the Commonwealth, intended for audiences ranging from narrow-interest to the general public.

This past session, the Kentucky General Assembly passed legislation expanding incentive programs for filmmaking in Kentucky.

Pat emails us, “I love the NPR app for my Kindle, but WEKU seems to have disappeared.  I have tried zip code, city/state and call letters with no success. Any search tips?” 

We’re not sure what’s going on with the Kindle app for NPR but we’re going to check it out and report back to our listeners at a later date.

From the WEKU Facebook page, some comments about this week’s Eastern Standard show on the Shaping Our Appalachian Region Initiative and the economy of Eastern Kentucky.

Lisa wrote, “ Enjoyed this show and hearing the plans for Eastern Kentucky. Nice job Ian Mooers, your associates, and the host. This is always a good show.”

Allen Ault is Dean of the College of Justice and Safety at Eastern Kentucky University.  As Dean Ault prepares to retire, we’ll discuss the death penalty, police/community relations and law enforcement trends today on Eastern Standard.

We'll learn about the latest developments with the Shaping Our Appalachian Region initiative and we're interested in your questions, comments and stories. 

Guests include: Gov. Steve Beshear; Ian Patrick Mooers, Executive Director of the Center for Economic Development at Eastern Kentucky; and Sandi Curd Program Coordinator of the Kentucky Promise Zone

We had two tweets at the end of the week from John Paul, regarding last week’s broadcast of Eastern Standard featuring NPR national political correspondent Don Gonyea, John Paul wrote, “Interesting program.  Thanks for letting us get to know Don a little better,” followed by “I was somewhat surprised in his remarks re. biased coverage. I'm convinced that bias is part of every human commentary.”

Here’s a voicemail message we received early Thursday morning from Danny, “Right at 4:00 am on May 28, we were hearing a flute song and, when that went off, nothing else happened.” 

NPR's National Political Correspondent Don Gonyea is our guest on this week's show. This program is the one recorded during the annual WEKU Day Sponsor event May 1 at the Griffin Gate Marriott Resort and Spa in Lexington.     

Don Gonyea talks about his career at NPR, reporting on 9/11 as well as his years covering political campaigns and elections on this program that features questions and comments from WEKU listeners in attendance.

A hundred teachers from across the country have been singled out for their successes in integrating digital technology into their schools. They have been named PBS Learning Media Digital Innovators. On this week's show we'll meet one of them, Susan Cintra of Madison Central High School, and other guests.

On our website is the news story by WEKU’s Stu Johnson, headlined, Second Hemp Crop Planted in Ky. A reader, identifying as "Hemp Authority," commented, ”This will be a great test to see what actually comes of some serious acreage of hemp growth across the state. Hopefully the industry will come back strong and create many new jobs and tax dollars.” 


Noah Day

Kentuckians head to the polls next week for the primary elections that features candidates for governor and other state constitutional offices.

We’ll discuss the twists and turns of the governor’s race and other matters on the ballot on this week's show.  

First up, an announcement regarding technical matters.  For the next few weeks, we are likely to have outages on 90.9 WEKH out of Hazard as a result of tower work being done by our “landlord” KET. 

These outages will happen during daylight hours, on days when weather permits work on the tower and they are unavoidable due to the nature of the work as a matter of safety for the tower crews.

You’ll find more information on the WEKU Facebook page and at WEKU dot FM.

Richard Turner

While Americans have access to the best medical care in the world, some choose to ignore that care, relying on their faith to take care such needs, sometimes with tragic results. On this week’s show we'll discuss the conflict between the religious beliefs of some Americans in Conflict with Modern Medicine.

We’re still struggling with some technical issues, especially on the 90.9 signal out of Hazard. Just so you know, we are working on diagnosing the problem that some listeners are reporting and then getting it fixed.  Thanks for your patience and please keep letting us know when you hear technical problems.

The most recent data from The Centers for Disease Control indicate that about 1 in 68 children has been identified with Autism Spectrum Disorder.   


April is Autism Awareness Month, so on this week's show, we'll discuss Autism, individuals who are identified as Autistic, and the impact this has on them and their families.


Our comments this week are, as is often the case, all focused on technical matters. Last week, a listener informed us that the pre-roll message on our web audio stream is still playing on one device, her Kindle.

On Facebook, Steve commented in response to the post about the Eastern Standard show, posing the questions, Is Religion Obsolete in the 21st Century, “ He writes, “I find it quite distasteful that you are airing this program on Easter Sunday. I would rather listen to your fund drives." 

Steve continued, "I would expect this from such a liberal station but your choice of when to air it is off the charts. Anyway, letting you know that I will not be sending any more money your way and I am taking you off my presets.”  

Logan Riley

Next month, voters from across the Commonwealth go to the polls to select candidates for the fall gubernatorial election.  Meanwhile, one Kentuckian has launched a campaign for our nation's highest elected office.

In other news, well....we'll ask our reporters around the table for what's on their minds.

Our guests this week:  Stu Johnson WEKU Reporter; Sam Youngman, political reporter with the Lexington Herald Leader; Ryland Baron, KPRN's State Capitol Bureau Chief.  

This Thursday, churches, temples, public buildings and others will ring bells for four minutes, symbolizing the four years of the war that threatened to tear our country apart. That day, April 4, will mark the 150th anniversary of the "war between the states."

On this week's show, we'll discuss the Civil War, its end and its effects on Kentucky.

Our guests this week:

Robert wrote to us, “I was wondering if Kentucky Center Stage programs are archived for any period of time, so that one can listen to them from the website after they are broadcast."

Robert explained, "I was a soloist (Evangelist) for the St. John Passion, but was occupied and unable to stream it from the website (I’m out of radio range). I wondered if I can listen to it later, like Millenium Stage on the Kennedy Center’s website.”

First up, a response to listeners who have been in touch regarding technical problems with our signal at 88.5 in Corbin. We are very much aware of some issues there in the last few days and engineer Bill Browning is looking into what’s going on there.  

The best we can tell at the moment is that it’s another case of an unreliable Internet connection.  We apologize for the disruptions and we remain grateful to those who write or call to let us know about them, especially Karen in London.

Richard Turner

For Christians, this week is Holy Week while Jews are getting ready for Passover. During this week when many people are thinking about such matters, we’ll discuss the role of faith in our society. 

We start with an email note from Connie, “As I listened to feedback this morning, I felt compelled to speak up and say how much I value your programming (except for Ask Me Another) and how glad I am that I can receive it from the Hazard transmitter.(90.9)"

Connie continued, "If the transmission gets staticky, I listen on my phone and have never had a problem.  Anyway, I wanted to send you a big thumbs-up.”

Logan Riley

A three-part public TV series will focus next week on Cancer: the Emperor of All Maladies.  It’s the latest production from documentarian Ken Burns. On this week’s Eastern Standard, Cancer in Kentucky.  

Richard Turner

In recent decades, the distinctions between police and the military have increasingly clouded. On this week's program, we will meet Eastern Kentucky University's Dr. Peter Kraska, a leading scholar of policing and criminal justice as we discuss Expanded Police Militarization.

Here’s an anonymous call from the WEKU Listener Comment Line. (male caller) “It’s about 4:30 in the afternoon here and I’ve heard this every Saturday, for the last three weekends, I know for sure.”

For those who heard our feedback last week, this is especially embarrassing, since we’ve now allowed the same episode of On the Media to air three weeks in a row.

As I mentioned last week, it was originally an error by the producer in New York, failing to properly date the computer audio files.  This week, it is clearly our fault and WILL NOT happen again.

Logan Riley

The Kentucky Senate wants to require public school students to use the bathroom of their biological sex. That’s an issue affecting transgender students while late last year, an Ohio teen committed suicide stating a hope that her death would create a dialogue about discrimination, abuse and lack of support for transgender people.

On this week's show, we'll carry on the dialogue about transgender rights and identity.

We had an email  from listener, Scott:  “What gives with iPhone app?  Cluttered, confusing, icons that don't seem to do anything, can't access 102.1.” 

“Just simplify,” Scott continued, referring to other stations that have apps he likes.   “You can do better.”

Sara, wrote to us on Facebook Saturday, “I think today's broadcast of On the Media repeats last week's.”

Richard Turner

Last month, Eastern Kentucky University faced a perceived threat on public safety stemming from bathroom graffiti.

  On this week’s Eastern Standard, we’ll discuss emergency planning, crisis management, and communication on college campuses.