John Hingsbergen

Associate Manager/Program Director

Ways to Connect

Kentucky Humanities Council

President Trump’s proposed federal budget includes a plan to zero-out funding for the National Endowments for the Arts and Humanities, and the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.


On this week’s Eastern Standard, we’ll discuss what such cuts could mean for Kentucky.

We received a detailed email from listener and supporter in Frankfort, Andy. He writes,  “I was interested to hear today's story about a solar array being installed at the KY Coal Museum in Benham."  


Thinkstock

Two people who spent years in a Kentucky jail after being wrongfully charged with murder have sued 10 police officers from three departments. They allege there was a conspiracy to frame them by planting evidence to protect a confidential informant.                                                 

 

Clay County Schools - clay.k12.ky.us

Children attending a southeastern Kentucky elementary school are participating in a whole new library experience. The changes have been made possible through a joint project by Eastern Kentucky University and Berea
College. 

  

NPR

Last week’s collapse of an Interstate 85 bridge in Atlanta will likely affect hundreds of spring break travelers from Kentucky.  State transportation officials are urging motorists to check all traffic routing sources before making the trip through Georgia's capital city.

 

More than 80 Kentucky school districts were scheduled to observe spring break this week.  The I-75 path to Florida is a popular one for many Kentuckians. 

John Hingsbergen

A crowd of about a hundred gathered in Berea Monday to show support for a lesbian couple targeted by vandals.  Organizers also used the event to draw attention to the need for a fairness ordinance in the Madison County community.   


Marisa Hempel

The Kentucky General Assembly wrapped up this past week, and not only were there overrides to the Governor’s vetoes, but the new Republican super-majority successfully passed quite a bit of new legislation in what seems to be record time.


On this week’s Eastern Standard, our panel of reporters joins us for a roundtable to discuss all legislative news that occurred in Frankfort this year.

 

We received the following email from listener Betty one morning last week during the WEKU Spring Fund Drive. She wrote, “I thought I ought to let you know, before your pledge day is over, that I had a problem trying to make a donation by phone call before 7 a.m. this morning." 


Lexington Herald-Leader/Kentucky.com - File photo Mark Cornelison

Human rights and LGBTQ advocates are organizing in Berea Monday evening. They’re reacting to  an incident in which a lesbian couple were targeted with graffiti.

Bereans for Fairness and the Madison County chapter of Kentuckians for the Commonwealth are sponsoring a rally followed by a march to a meeting of the city’s Human Rights Commission.

lrc.com

Kentucky House lawmakers have voted overwhelmingly to override Republican Gov. Matt Bevin's vetoes of two bills.

As WEKU’s John Hingsbergen reports, the bills concern regulating drones and deciding who gets to spend up to $100 million from a legal settlement with Volkswagen.


Kentucky lawmakers Wednesday wrapped up work on an education bill that would gradually repeal Common Core standards.

As WEKU’s John Hingsbergen reports, it would give school districts more control in how to turn around low-performing schools.   


In recent years, Lexington’s headlines have been filled with the results of gun violence.

On this week's Eastern Standard, we will be talking about gun violence, live from Lexington City Hall with Mayor Jim Gray and Police Chief Mark Barnard. We will also have Laura Hatfield, Executive Director of Partners for Youth on the show as trends show many gun-related homicides involve young adults.

More than 30 Kentucky county and state prosecutors are undergoing intensive trial advocacy training this week in Lexington.  The Kentucky Prosecutor's Institute is designed for those who've pursued fewer than five trials.

WKYT

2017 started in the Lexington community with an uptick in unemployment.  Lexington’s Finance Commissioner sees no reason to sound an economic alarm. 

The jobless rate for Fayette County jumped almost a percentage point from December to January, going from 3.1 percent to 4 percent. 

Finance Commissioner Bill O’Mara says more study may lend more answers, but he says there’s typically less employment past the holiday period.  Plus more people are likely looking for work.

On this week's special edition of the show, we'll hear from: former NPR newscaster Jean Cochran; political correspondent Don Gonyea; science correspondent Joe Palca; and Wait Wait..Don't Tell Me's Peter Sagal.

It's a recorded edition of the show but you don't want to miss it!

The Perry County Adult Drug Court is set to receive $1.3 million in federal support.  The grant from the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and the U.S. Bureau of Justice Assistance will be used to expand treatment services.  The funds are intended to help people who struggle with employment issues, mental health problems or a lack of basic education.

 

Wells says the funds will also provide a peer support specialist, who can relate to what drug court participants are going through. 

We've had a couple of calls to the Listener Comment Line to share this week.

First up, a self-described longtime listener and supporter, choosing to remain anonymous.

“I just wanted to comment about how hard it is for me to contribute since I don’t have Internet. It’s hard for me to reach you when you’re running the advertisements about your “upcoming fund drive or you can go ahead and support the station early even before the fund drive begins. It’s very hard to call in and do that.  Nobody answers.

Stu Johnson

Lexington’s mayor participated in a special flag-raising event Thursday.  As WEKU’S Stu Johnson reports, it marked the unveiling of the city’s first community spirit flag.   

Mayor Gray:  "I will tell you, that you all have confirmed, that if you got to get a tough job done, then give it to the students and the teachers, congratulations," Mayor Jim Gray’s comments just before the community spirit flag was hoisted up the pole at the Lexington Christian Academy.  

Lexington-Fayette Co. Health Dept.

Later this year, Madison County will join about 15 other Kentucky communities that offer needle or syringe exchanges. The county’s fiscal court gave unanimous approval Tuesday morning.   

Like most of the state, Madison County has seen alarming increases in the number of Hepatitis C infections caused by sharing of dirty needles by drug users.

The County’s Board of Health held two informational meetings earlier this year in Richmond and Berea before considering the resolution to establish the program.

Marisa Hempel

We’ve been hearing a lot about “fake news” and “alternative facts” lately. Some folks say these are symptoms of challenges to journalism.

 



On this week’s Eastern Standard: Fake News and other Challenges to Journalism.

 

Here’s an email we received last week from a listener choosing to remain anonymous.

He starts out with, “Aaaargh!!.”  

He goes on to write, “Listener Feedback is the most painful part of Monday morning!  It's even worse than the review of the weekend Trump tweets. 

Can you move it back to, like, 3:45am so we don't have to listen to every gawdawful cranky-pants in the state complain about how to pronounce "Athens" or if Garrison Keillor was better?? 

Dang!  Monday's are hard enough as it is!”

John Hingsbergen

On this week's show, Ted Gioia, musician and author who has published ten non-fiction books, most recently the acclaimed How to Listen to Jazz (Basic Books). 

First up this week, a caller choosing to remain anonymous who left a message over the weekend, “I have listened to this station for about three months since I move here from Georgia. It is nothing but a repetition of the morning programs and nothing but begging, begging, begging for contributions."


kentucky.com

Kentucky lawmakers Friday gave final approval to a bill altering the state’s medical malpractice system.

It will do so by creating panels of medical providers to review claims of error or neglect.

Robert Weber, LRC

The 2017 Kentucky General Assembly saw a rush of activity during a busy first week, with some major Republican priorities passing both the House and Senate without pushback.

As the legislative session continues, we’ll make our annual visit to the Capitol to talk with Senate Pres. Robert Stivers and House Speaker Jeff Hoover.


 

Listener Mary Ann emailed us, “I am wondering why you had nothing to say about the boil water advisory being lifted this morning. Not everyone plays with social media.” 

To Mary Ann: Although I am unable to document every instance, I know for a fact that we did mention the lifting of the boil water advisory at least a couple of times that morning.

Marisa Hempel

Kentucky’s Supreme Court struck down Lexington’s panhandling ordinance last week, saying the ban violated free speech. While the homeless in Lexington can now panhandle without fear of prosecution, there are other issues of concern related to basic subsistence.


On this week’s Eastern Standard, homelessness in the Commonwealth.

 

This note came from Jordan, writing, “Morning!  I've listened to WEKU every morning on my commute for the last several years - you guys are awesome!  One small comment, though.  Every morning when Bryan Bartlett gives the time it is one minute fast when compared to the atomic clock in Boulder, CO, which is the United States' primary time and frequency standard.  http://www.time.gov/” 

THE RICHMOND BOIL WATER ADVISORY WAS LIFTED MONDAY EVENING. Customers of Richmond Utilities are now free to use tap water normally.

Singer, actor and dancer Ben Vereen brings his show called “Steppin Out” to the Norton Center for the Arts Saturday evening.  

WEKU’s John Hingsbergen spoke with the 70-year-old about his show, the value of the arts and some of his current efforts, including a project to help troubled kids.  

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