John Hingsbergen

Associate Manager/Program Director

Ways to Connect

Marisa Hempel

Kentucky’s Supreme Court struck down Lexington’s panhandling ordinance last week, saying the ban violated free speech. While the homeless in Lexington can now panhandle without fear of prosecution, there are other issues of concern related to basic subsistence.


On this week’s Eastern Standard, homelessness in the Commonwealth.

 

This note came from Jordan, writing, “Morning!  I've listened to WEKU every morning on my commute for the last several years - you guys are awesome!  One small comment, though.  Every morning when Bryan Bartlett gives the time it is one minute fast when compared to the atomic clock in Boulder, CO, which is the United States' primary time and frequency standard.  http://www.time.gov/” 

THE RICHMOND BOIL WATER ADVISORY WAS LIFTED MONDAY EVENING. Customers of Richmond Utilities are now free to use tap water normally.

Singer, actor and dancer Ben Vereen brings his show called “Steppin Out” to the Norton Center for the Arts Saturday evening.  

WEKU’s John Hingsbergen spoke with the 70-year-old about his show, the value of the arts and some of his current efforts, including a project to help troubled kids.  

Marisa Hempel

Kentucky’s universities are facing performance-based funding, likely to be mandated by the General Assembly and the governor. Meanwhile Eastern Kentucky University continues planning for tighter budgets while continuing to revitalize the campus in Richmond.

From a listener in Richmond, choosing to remain anonymous, “On Monday, January 23,  a comment was read from a listener named Elaine. She said ‘When I moved to Kentucky from Ohio, I determined not to acquire a southern accent. To this purpose, I listened to NPR for good pronunciation and grammar.’

Rich Copley rcopley@herald-leader.com

It’s time for our weekly chat featuring arts and cultural activities with Rich Copley and Harriett Hendren of the Lexington Herald-Leader.

This week, they begin by telling us that Woodford Theatre, in its latest production, is having fun with nuns.


Marisa Hempel

The new president’s executive order limiting travel from seven Middle Eastern and African countries has kept immigration on our minds these past couple of weeks.


On this week’s EST, we’ll discuss immigration in the Commonwealth.

 

 

John Hingsbergen

A crowd of at least a thousand gathered Sunday in downtown Lexington to show support for immigrants and refugees and disapproval of President Trump’s ban on travel from seven predominantly-Muslim nations.

The rally went forward despite a federal judge’s “stay” of the president’s executive order. It was organized by area high school and college students. It included remarks by representatives of the local religious and civil rights leaders and elected officials including 13th District State Senator Reggie Thomas.

Last week, I responded to a listener’s description of  WEKU as a “liberal radio station” saying , we do our best, as does NPR, to always provide politically-balanced programming and news coverage.  

Another listener took exception with that, saying while it’s been “wonderful” listening to our programming over the last several years, the consensus is that NPR’s programming, and as a result ours is “left leaning.”


Barr Campaign

Sixth District Representative Andy Barr says he supports President Donald Trump’s controversial executive order banning travel to the U.S. from seven predominantly Muslim countries.

In a conversation with WEKU’s John Hingsbergen, the congressman also expressed his support for the president’s nomination of Judge Neil Gorsuch (GORE-such) to the U.S. Supreme Court.

It’s time for our weekly chat featuring arts and cultural activities with Rich Copley and Harriett Hendren of the Lexington Herald-Leader.  This week, they begin with a focus on a number of weekend bluegrass events.

Rich Copley and Harriett Hendren cover arts and culture for the Lexington Herald-Leader and Lexgo dot com. You can find many listings of arts and cultural activities at the events calendar link at WEKU dot FM. 

February is Black History Month; and on this week’s Eastern Standard we’ll kick off the month with a discussion of African American achievements, heritage and culture in Kentucky.

 


Kentucky.com

Following a weekend of reactions to President Donald Trump’s executive order limiting immigration into the U.S, Lexington’s mayor says the city will continue welcoming those who come into the community. 
 

Mayor Jim Gray reacted to the nationwide and international controversy in a series of tweets, beginning with the comment that (quote) “The President's actions have created unnecessary anxiety and unrest.His poorly developed plan divides the American people.”

Here’s an email we received from Thomas in Lexington, “I listen to WEKU every morning for the news and weather. I use the current temperature to decide how warm a coat to wear but some mornings you do not give the current temperature. Why not?” 

I wrote back to Thomas, letting him know that we certainly intend to give temperatures frequently for a number of locations during Morning Edition.  If we’ve been failing to do so, we’ll make sure we resume the practice.

STEPHANIE KEITH/GETTY IMAGES

An executive order issued Friday banning refugees and limiting immigration from several Muslim-majority countries set off a flurry of protests and court filings over the weekend.

It’s time for our weekly chat featuring arts and cultural activities with Rich Copley and Harriett Hendren of the Lexington Herald-Leader. This week, they begin with a focus on local music and the Lexington Music Awards. 

Rich Copley and Harriett Hendren cover arts and culture for the Lexington Herald-Leader and Lexgo dot com.

You can find many listings of arts and cultural activities at the events calendar link at WEKU dot FM. 

The theme for the 2016/2017 series of Chautauqua lectures at Eastern Kentucky University is “Order and Chaos.”   On this week’s Eastern Standard, we’ll meet some of the folks who’ve been on campus so far this academic year.

GUESTS:

Erik Liddell, Coordinator of the Chautauqua lecture series at EKU;

Pablo Alcala, Lexington Herald-Leader

NOTE: Mayor Gray's entire "State of the City" address is here for listening & downloading.

Mayor Jim Gray says there are more people employed in the bluegrass city than at any time in the city’s history.  That was one of several points made during the mayor’s annual “State of the City” speech before government, business, education, and other civic leaders. 

Gray began his remarks saying he and City Council work together to further progress in Lexington.

Here’s an email from Elaine in Lexington,  “When I moved to Kentucky from Ohio, I determined not to acquire a southern accent. To this purpose, I listened to NPR for good pronunciation and grammar."

It’s time for our weekly chat featuring arts and cultural activities with Rich Copley and Harriett Hendren of the Lexington Herald-Leader.  This week, they start with a mention of one of the area’s entertainment hot spots that Rich and colleague Walter Tunis visited.  


npr.org

WEKU joins other public media this week in asking the questions:

 


 

  

- What do you want from the incoming administration"

- What do you want the president to know about you and your community? About Kentuckians?
 

- Do you think the country is more divided than ever?

Here’s an email we received from Philis, in Lexington who tells us she’s been an avid listener and supporter of WEKU since she moved to Lexington over 20 years ago. 

She wrote to say, “In my house I have three Internet radios that I programmed to have WEKU as one of the presets.  I have not been able to get your station for several months.

In the past I listened to WEKU more than any other stations.  This is partly because I prefer a local station, but I also like your programming.

Are you planning to fix the digital streaming or should I consider switching my donations to the station that I am actually listening to more.”

Marisa Hempel

The Kentucky General Assembly is on a planned break for now.  But last week’s flurry of activity was part of a short legislative session that marks the beginning of Republican control of state government for the first time ever in almost a century..

 


 

On this week’s Eastern Standard, a panel of reporters joins us for a roundtable on the General Assembly.

Here’s an email from Nancy, “Recently I listened to an interview with author/activist Claudia Rankin.  She mentioned black men dying in the streets in America every day, the prisons being filled with black men and racism in America.  


It’s time for our weekly chat featuring arts and cultural activities with Rich Copley and Harriett Hendren of the Lexington Herald-Leader.  They tell us, with the holidays behind us, a more routine schedule of  events resumes.  


On this week’s Eastern Standard, NPR Science Correspondent, Joe Palca. 

Joe Palca joins us in a program recorded in May of 2016 at WEKU’s annual Day Sponsor event and you can hear it this Thursday morning at 11:00 and Sunday evening at 6:00.

Lexington Herald- Leader www.kentucky.com

It's an encore of a special recorded edition of the show that aired originally on March 24, 2016 but we're still glad to have your comments. Post them here on the website, on Facebook or by email to: wekueasternstandard@gmail.com

We’ll discuss this 2013 discovery with University of Kentucky paleoanthropologist Dr. Andrew Deane who was called to South Africa to join the team examining over 1,500 bones that were found. 

kidsnow.ky.gov

When it comes to quality, Kentucky’s Head Start programs have received a very high ranking.  A Head Start administrator says a commitment to intense training is a major key to success.  Since 1965, Head Start has been offering free early childhood education and other services to low income families. 

Just last week, the National Institute for Early Education Research ranked Kentucky number two in program quality, second only to Vermont. 

https://www.berea.edu/pfe/
Berea College Partners for Education

Berea College is being awarded $6 million to expand a federal program aimed at helping students in high poverty areas go to college.  The Promise Neighborhood funds will be used in Knox County.


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