John Hingsbergen

Associate Manager/Program Director

Ways to Connect

We solicit comments regarding all of our programming at WEKU but this week, I have a few directed specifically at our public affairs call-in show Eastern Standard. 

These are tweets that didn’t make it to the air following our August 18th show on Safe Spaces on Campus.

First, from Lee Ann, reacting to a remark I made while formulating a question for the guests:

It’s time for our weekly update of weekend arts and cultural events with Rich Copley of the Lexington Herald-Leader. Rich tells us he’s a “solo act” this week as Harriett Hendren takes some time off after putting together the 2016-2017 arts calendar for Sunday’s paper.   

Rich Copley & Harriett Hendren cover arts and culture for the Lexington Herald-Leader and Lexgo dot com. 

You can also find listings of arts and cultural activities at the events calendar link at WEKU dot FM. 

A new director has been named for the State Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control’s Enforcement Division.  Paul Joseph Vido comes to the job after serving as Special Agent in Charge for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms, and Explosives out of Louisville. 

Vido administered all ATF investigations and regulatory operations in Kentucky, West Virginia, and Southern Indiana.  Prior to coming to Kentucky, he served in a similar role in California. 

U.S. communities hard hit by coal industry layoffs in eight Appalachian states and Texas are being promised more than 3,000 jobs in several industries through a multimillion-dollar federal grant.  

Officials for the Appalachian Regional Commission and other agencies announced the 29 projects totaling nearly $39 million at a news conference in Huntington, West Virginia yesterday.  

By AxelBoldt (talk · contribs) - Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=46682644

Kentucky is among five states that are again suing the Obama administration over its efforts to strengthen discrimination protections for transgender people.   

The lawsuit was filed Tuesday in a North Texas federal court. It seeks to block parts of a nondiscrimination mandate of President Barack Obama's health care law.

Opponents of the president’s order say the rules could force doctors to act against their medical judgments or religious convictions.

John Hingsbergen

On this week’s Kentucky Summer Stage…WindSync...

Their hometown Houston Chronicle calls the quintet “revolutionary chamber musicians”

The gold medalists in the national Fischoff Chamber Music Competition gave a mini concert on the campus of Eastern Kentucky last Sunday and you can hear it on Kentucky Summer Stage Sunday evening at 8:00 on 88.9 WEKU.

Nicole Erwin | Ohio Valley ReSource

On 120 acres in Marion, Kentucky, small-scale farmer Joseph Mast is taking an innovative approach to provide for his growing family of nine.

Mast belongs to an Amish community and is reluctant when it comes to media. He makes a concession, however, when the conversation involves sustainable farming.   

“I’ll talk grass any day,” said Mast.

Here’s an email from listener Tim,  “I have listen(ed) to this station for the last four or five years and it seems to me that you guys get more and more one-sided all the time.  Try at least to say something good about the other side once in a blue moon.  We are all Americans.  We, Republicans are not your enemies.”

The Madison County Sheriff's department is investigating an incident that caused Eastern Kentucky University officials to issue multiple emergency alerts during the weekend. EKU sent out a campus alert shortly after 2:30 Sunday morning. 

The initial alert sent by email, text and voicemail to students, faculty and others in the Richmond area, reported a “dangerous situation” involving a “possibly armed individual.”

15 minutes later, university safety officials said four persons were detained by police on the EKU following an incident in which shots were fired off campus.

It’s time for our weekly chat featuring weekend arts and cultural events with Rich Copley and Harriett Hendren of the Lexington Herald-Leader.

Today, they’re thinking about concerts, movies and Lexington’s annual arts festival.

Rich Copley & Harriett Hendren cover arts and culture for the Lexington Herald-Leader and Lexgo dot com. 

You can also find listings of arts and cultural activities at the events calendar link at WEKU dot FM. 

John Hingsbergen

As faculty and staff prepare for the Fall Academic Term, Eastern Kentucky University’s President gave his annual convocation address yesterday. Dr. Michael Benson projected an upbeat attitude about the school’s present and future.    

  With students returning to campuses across Kentucky, we’re hearing a new term, “Safe spaces.”  It’s something that began in the area of women’s rights and within the LGBT community and we’re wondering if it will tend to benefit or hinder the development of young people in college.

On this week's show: Matthew P. Winslow, PhD.: EKU Department of Psychology, Marieke Beck-Coon: Senior Program Officer of Foundation for Individual Rights in Education (FIRE), and Dr. Meta Mendel-Reyes: Professor of Social Justice Studies at Berea College.

Here’s an email from Lisa in Berea,  “Hey! It's taken me a while to respond to something I heard during your last fund drive, but here I am now.  I noticed what seemed like a lot of negative comments about the development of the Prairie Home Companion's new format. I disagree." 

  

   

Lisa continues, "I like that they are trying something new with a new host. I like that they focused on his strengths and expertise. I hope they will continue to explore ways to do drama, storytelling and comedy, but I appreciate the shift in emphasis.”

Trade has emerged as a potent issue this election season, with the pending Trans-Pacific Partnership, or TPP, a flash point in the political debate. The stakes are high for the Ohio Valley region, where thousands of workers and billions of dollars in goods could be affected by the outcome of this trade agreement.  

To learn more, I visited two manufacturing companies in the Bowling Green, Kentucky, area: conveyer-belt maker Span-Tech and auto parts maker Trace Die Cast.

On this week's show, the annual summer production of UK Opera Theatre featuring over a dozen showtunes, "A Grand Night for Singing."  So many tunes that we're going to have to do it as a two-part production.   

Join us for Kentucky Summer Stage, Sunday August 14 AND August 21 at 8:00 pm on WEKU.

John Hingsbergen

Kentucky’s Secretary of State is encouraging eligible voters to register and participate in this year’s general election.  Secretary Alison Lundergran Grimes spoke Thursday at a breakfast meeting sponsored by the Richmond Chamber of Commerce. 

In addition to the very visible presidential election, every seat of the state’s House of Representatives, half of the Senate and some state Supreme Court races will be on the ballot November 8th.

Richard Turner

While Americans have access to the best medical care in the world, some choose to ignore that care, relying on their faith to take care such needs, sometimes with tragic results. On this week’s show we'll discuss the conflict between the religious beliefs of some Americans in Conflict with Modern Medicine.

Emergency officials spent part of the day investigating a train derailment in the central Kentucky town of Falmouth.

The CSX railroad says 24 cars came off the track this morning (Wed).  Four tank cars contained sulfuric acid but the railroad and local officials confirm that none of the hazardous materials were released.

Local officials issued a “shelter in place” order for the area within a half-mile of the derailment.

51fifty at the English language Wikipedia

Beginning this week doctors fighting the region’s opioid addiction crisis will have a little more to work with. The federal government will allow doctors to treat more patients with a drug called Buprenorphine.      


With the mining industry in sharp decline, some coalfield counties are hoping new prisons can generate jobs. Eastern Kentucky’s 5th Congressional District is already home to three federal penitentiaries and could soon see construction of a fourth in Letcher County. 

As Benny Becker reports, the proposal has sparked sharp debate over the economics and ethics of prisons.

A guest on campus at Eastern Kentucky University will talk on the topic: “What If We Live Off Earth: Exploring our Future in Space.”    

On this week’s Eastern Standard, we’ll meet astronomer, educator and author Chris Impey. Professor Impey will be delivering a talk as part of the EKU Chautauqua Lecture Series. 

This is a special encore edition of the program, originally broadcast on February 4, 2016.  

It’s time for our weekly chat featuring weekend arts and cultural events with Rich Copley and Harriett Hendren of the Lexington Herald-Leader. On their minds today are tonight’s concert by Lyle Lovett, some local bands and “free” events.

Rich Copley & Harriett Hendren cover arts and culture for the Lexington Herald-Leader and Lexgo dot com. 

You can also find listings of arts and cultural activities at the events calendar link at WEKU dot FM. 

Marvel Inc

What do the latest Ghostbusters, Spider-Man and Star Trek’s Mr. Sulu have in common?

 

On this week’s Eastern Standard, we’ll be answering that question and others as we examine the increasing diversity in the media.

We’re interested in your questions and comments before the show at wekueasternstandard@gmail.com.  You can leave a voice message at 859-622-1657 or call in when you tune in for EST Thursday morning at 11:00 on 88-9 WEKU.

 

Lexington Herald- Leader www.kentucky.com

The Lexington-Fayette Urban County Government has received a federal grant of over $14 million to complete the Town Branch Commons Corridor project.  The funds are being awarded by the U.S. Department of Transportation’s TIGER discretionary grant program.   

Listener Lee from Lexington was not happy with the presentation of a news story this past week, “In a recent news report about the NBA’s boycott of North Carolina, a WEKU news reporter said that the boycott was over a law infringing the civil rights of LGBTQ people."  

Lee continued, "That is editorializing, not news reporting.  I expect better than that of WEKU.”

It's cool jazz for a hot summer night on this week's Kentucky Summer Stage. Our July 24, 2015 show features the Legendary Count Basie Orchestra and Diane Schuur recorded in concert at Centre College's Norton Center for the Arts Friday October 30, 2015.

It’s the Count Basie Orchestra and Diane Schuur, at the Norton Center for the Arts during our eclectic series of concert programs, Kentucky summer Stage, Sunday evening at 8:00 on 88-9 WEKU.

Alexandra Kanik | Ohio Valley ReSource

As the opioid epidemic continues to plague the Ohio Valley with addiction and death, the search for safer methods of pain management has become increasingly urgent. 

Advocates for medical marijuana have recently made inroads in the area with growing scientific evidence that the substance currently considered of no medical value by the federal government might be a tool to wean those suffering from chronic pain off of more dangerous drugs.

 

Listener Lisa emailed in response to a comment from someone who hates our afternoon show from the CBC, “Q.”   

Lisa writes, “It made me cringe to see the guy from Corbin talk about how supposedly terrible Q is. It might not be relevant to his life, but I really enjoy the show. I enjoy learning about other cultures and hearing perspectives from outside the US, although Q is definitely still very influenced by the US and our media. It’s not boring, nor silly, nor pretentious. It might not be everyone’s cup of tea but it’s a nice change from the other news only shows.”

It’s time for our weekly chat featuring weekend arts and cultural events with Rich Copley and Harriett Hendren of the Lexington Herald-Leader. Today, their focus is largely on children and family-oriented events.  

Rich Copley & Harriett Hendren cover arts and culture for the Lexington Herald-Leader and Lexgo dot com.  

Hundreds of people of various faiths gathered Wednesday night in Lexington for an event described as a “concert, born of Orlando to remember all victims of hatred and violence.”  Participants included Muslims, Jews and Christians of various denominations.   

In response to last month’s massacre that killed 49 people at a gay bar in Orlando, the concert at Historic St. Paul’s Church downtown featured performances by about a dozen musicians with remarks and prayers led by local religious leaders.   

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