John Hingsbergen

Associate Manager/Program Director

Ways To Connect

On the station website at, listener Don wrote a comment in response to a news story by reporter Stu Johnson, headlined Eastern Kentucky Residents Steadily Moving Forward Following Summer Floods,  Don wrote, “Wonderful writing Stu! Keep reporting on life and living!”

Michael Benson, PhD

Eastern Kentucky University President Michael Benson joins us on this week’s Eastern Standard.

Among the topics we’ll discuss the University’s Vision 2020 project, the Freshman Academy for Diverse Students, a pay raise for EKU employees and other issues. 

You’re welcome to send your question or comment before the show by email to wekueasternstandard at gmail dot com or at 859-622-1657.

Or call in when you tune in for EST Thursday morning at 11:00 on 88.9 WEKU.

We begin this week with a comment from an anonymous listener about traffic reports, “Well, it’s 7:52 in the morning on the 21st of September and traffic is backed up from Versailles Rd. to the first Versailles exit on the Bluegrass Parkway, and the morning drive host is telling us there are no delays to be concerned about.  You don’t have anybody spotting for you or your head’s in the sand or something.” 

According to the Kentucky Distillers Association, about 9,000 people owe their paychecks to the distilling industry which brings in over 300 million dollars in taxes for the state. More than 8,000 people are employed in jobs related to the brewing and distribution of beer.  That industry adds 160 million in tax revenue. 

On this week’s show, an encore of our November 2014 discussion on the impact of Beer and Bourbon in the Bluegrass.

Last week we mentioned that we forwarded a question to NPR from listener Antoinette, “Is it true that NPR will not include Bernie Sanders as a viable candidate for the democratic presidential nomination?”

NPR released a statement in response to questions of this type, referring specifically to a story titled “Biden Fuels Speculation Of Presidential Run With College Affordability Speech.” 

The City of Lexington has approved the relocation of its services for homeless persons. While the move has had some opposition from area businesses, the city’s Director of Homelessness Prevention and Intervention sees it as a major step forward, saying it will provide more convenience for service providers and clients and a higher quality of service. 


Homelessness in Central Kentucky is our topic on this week’s Eastern Standard.

A Lexington listener emailed us, asking to remain anonymous.  He begins by saying, “Thanks for the rush hour traffic reports.”  He then points out that we sometimes mispronounce one of the boulevards in Lexington, saying,  “Aristides is pronounced with the accent on the second “i,” which is a “long” “i,” as in Aphrodite, instead of like Euripides.”  

Aristides, the horse, won the first Kentucky Derby in 1875.

Noah Day

In light of recent events related to the issuance of marriage licenses for same-sex couples, separation of church and state has been on the minds of many Kentuckians. On this week's show, we'll discuss Separation of Church and State.


Dan Bennett, assistant professor of political science at Eastern Kentucky University, whose research focuses on the intersection of politics, law, and religion in the United States.

  Dr. Dorothy Edwards is passionate about eliminating the problem of sexual violence in our society and specifically on college campuses. On this week's show we'll hear from the author and creator of the Green Dot prevention program and discuss efforts to eliminate sexual violence in Kentucky.


More than 43 percent of teens report being bullied online. That’s according to a recent study commissioned by the National Crime Prevention Council. Bullying, online and in-person, has been cited as a cause of teens becoming depressed and physically ill and missing school, even considering suicide.

On this week’s EST, bullying as a Commonwealth problem. We'll spoke with our guests about the harmful effects of bullying, and what's being done to solve this problem.

Guests this week include:

Last week we brought you some comments from listeners who stopped by to see us at two area festivals, namely the Woodland Art Fair and Crave Lexington. Here are some more comments from the weekends of August 15th and 16th and the 22nd and 23rd.    

The news story on the WEKU website headlined,  Judge Orders County Clerk to Issue Marriage Licenses by August 31st, received a number of comments in the Disqus area attached to the story.

Among those comments, one from a writer self-identifying as “Stryke,”  “So, in America, a land of laws, any little two-bit clerk can just pick and choose which ones he/she will abide by and enforce? Regardless of Supreme Court rulings? Have we gone utterly insane?” 

  African Americans were among the first settlers of Kentucky.  Since then, they have played significant roles as builders, entrepreneurs, politicans, doctors, soldiers….and the list goes on and on.

On this week’s show, the new Kentucky African American Encyclopedia.  We’ll meet the people who made it happen and learn some of the facts and stories in this nearly 600-page volume.

Recent allegations against Planned Parenthood have resulted in calls for de-funding the non-profit provider of family planning services.  Among them is Kentucky gubernatorial candidate Matt Bevin.

Here’s an update on transmitter problems in Hazard and Pineville:  First, the tough one, Hazard. We are awaiting a response from an insurance adjuster about that situation, hoping our claim of possible storm damage will provide some funds to help us get a new transmitter on the air.  As for now, 90.9 is still operating at about 500 watts.  That about 5% of the normal power for that station.

In the midst of our efforts to find the funds to replace our transmitter for 90.9 in Hazard, we have a situation in Pineville.  The transmitter for 90.1 WEKP went off the air, possibly during a storm last week and remains off the air today.

Our engineers traveled to the site on Friday and are working with the manufacturer to diagnose and repair the problem keeping it off the air.

Groups such as the World Health Organization and the American Medical Association support the idea of needle exchanges as ways of reducing the spread of diseases like hepatitis among drug users.   Such programs distribute clean needles to drug addicts in exchange for dirty needles and encourage addicts to enter treatment programs.

Judy posted this on the website at regarding last week’s Eastern Standard,  “Thank you for your recent program on the projected effects of climate change. I was able to hear only a portion of the program as I was in transit to a meeting and listening on my car radio."

Lately, history and heritage have been on the minds of many here in the south. On this week’s show, we'll discuss Kentucky History. We’ll get to know some of the Commonwealth’s famous historical figures, like Daniel Boone and Henry Clay. What they were like; and what choices did they have to make that made them who they are.

Here's an email we received from listener, Jerry, "I  live in Johnson City, Tennessee and my family lives in Lee County Virginia. We can no longer hear WEKU on the radio. Please get it back on the air. What is the problem?"

Jerry's email represents numerous emails, phone calls and other messages we’ve been receiving for the greater part of the past two weeks.

An organization focused on quantifying economic risks and impacts of climate change, Risky Business, is releasing a report this week on its effects on the Southeastern United States, including Kentucky.

On this week’s Eastern Standard, we discuss the projected harmful effects of climate on the Commonwealth.


Our guests for this week's program are:

We’ve had another major problem with our transmitter at 90.9 FM. It went off the air last Tuesday morning during a thunderstorm and our engineer worked two full days trying to get it back to full power. Sadly, Phil Hayes was unable to do so and apparently the outdated and elderly equipment has passed the terminal stage.


The signal is back on the air operating at very low-power until further notice. Thankfully, we are able to provide service once again to immediate Hazard/Perry County area and communities nearby.

Richard Turner

As the annual observance of Ramadan draws to a close, on this week’s show, we’ll focus on the basics of Islam.  This is an encore of a show that originally aired July 31, 2014. 

Last week we aired a comment from Mona, concerned that we were canceling The Dinner Party Download.  I wrote to her explaining the new Friday evening schedule and here’s part of her response, “As you surmised, I discovered (to my delight) on Friday evening that Dinner Party Download had simply been shuffled in the day's schedule -- it is such a great way to kick off the weekend!"

Here’s another response to the question of whether listeners still appreciate Car Talk in its current form as a “best of” program. Jana, of Frankfort writes, “I actually started listening to WEKU rather than another area station because you carry Car Talk."  

Jana continued, "I enjoy the old episodes and listen nearly every Saturday morning while I lounge around trying not to get up and do anything productive!”

  As this year's Keeneland Concours d'Elegance revs up, we'll talk cars on this week's show.  Let's talk about your favorite car, maybe your first or the one that got away and that you wished you had never gotten rid of.

Guests: Kenneth Hold, founding member of the Keeneland Concours & George Schweikle, Director of Filed Operations for the Keeneland Concours.

Last week, we aired a Facebook message from listener Rebecca, wondering if others shared her view that it was time to re-think the airing of The Best of Car Talk and we tossed it to you.  As of this weekend, we have had a total of three responses.  One from Tom in Lexington agreeing with Rebecca. 

Noah Day

  The Supreme Court last week issued a much-anticipated ruling last week, declaring that marriage can no longer be denied to same-sex couple anywhere in the U.S.  On this week's show, we’ll meet some of the people involved in the issue in the Commonwealth. 

Our guests on this week's program are:

The Frankfort State Journal

FRANKFORT, Ky. (June 26, 2015) – “The fractured laws across the country concerning same-sex marriage had created an unsustainable and unbalanced legal environment, wherein citizens were treated differently depending on the state in which they resided.  That situation was unfair, no matter which side of the debate you may support.

On the Listener Comment Line, Susan left the following message on Friday morning, “Roughly at 8:45, you said that Juneteenth was the anniversary of the last state in the Union freeing its slaves. 150 years ago today, slaves had not yet been freed in Kentucky.”   

Susan goes on to tell us, “Because we were not a secessionist state, our state continued to hold some of our people in slavery in violation of their dignity.”