Jennifer Guerra

Jennifer is a reporter for Michigan Radio's State of Opportunity project, which looks at kids from low-income families and what it takes to get them ahead. She previously covered arts and culture for the station, and was one of the lead reporters on the award-winning education series Rebuilding Detroit Schools. Prior to working at Michigan Radio, Jennifer lived in New York where she was a producer at WFUV, an NPR station in the Bronx.

Her stories and documentaries have won numerous regional and national awards, and her work has aired on Morning Edition, All Things Considered, Marketplace and Studio 360.

Jennifer graduated from the University of Michigan and received her M.A. in broadcast journalism from Fordham University. When she's not on the radio, she and her husband are making up lyrics to songs and singing them to their adorable baby girl.  

5:57pm

Tue June 23, 2015
NPR Ed

A Recipe For Success With Two Student Groups That Often Struggle

Originally published on Tue June 23, 2015 8:56 pm

Lannie Castagne teaches first grade at Brimley Elementary School. She does monthly reading assessments to make sure her students are on track.
Jennifer Guerra/Michigan Public Radio

In Michigan's Upper Peninsula, Brimley is the kind of small town where the students of the month in the elementary school get full-page write-ups in the local newspaper.

There's an Indian reservation just up the road, a couple bars, a gas station, a motel and that's about it.

Brimley Elementary serves two groups that often struggle academically. Of the 300 students, more than half are Native American. Many come from low-income families.

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3:46am

Mon February 16, 2015
NPR Ed

Fitting In On Campus: Challenges For First-Generation Students

Originally published on Mon February 16, 2015 2:26 pm

Danielle Boshers, Anna Garcia and Chris Reynolds say the University of Michigan could do a better job welcoming first-generation students to campus.
Jen Guerra Michigan Radio

Chris Reynolds will never forget his first day at the University of Michigan. He and his dad got up superearly and drove nine and a half hours from Sellersville, a blue-collar factory town in Pennsylvania, to Ann Arbor.

"My father literally just dropped me off and then left," Reynolds says.

His dad couldn't afford a hotel, so they took about an hour to unpack the car, said their goodbyes, and his dad drove off.

Chris Reynolds was officially on his own.

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1:36pm

Mon January 19, 2015
NPR Ed

Classroom Reflections On America's Race Relations

Originally published on Wed January 21, 2015 11:25 am

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr., marches with other civil rights protesters during the 1963 March on Washington.
AP

In Peter Maginot's sixth-grade class, the teacher is white, but all of his students are black. They're young and they're honestly concerned that what happened to Trayvon Martin, Michael Brown and Eric Garner could happen to them.

"Who can tell me the facts that we know about Mike Brown?" Maginot asks the class at Shabazz Public School Academy, an afro-centric school in Lansing, Mich.

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4:35pm

Mon December 15, 2014
NPR Ed

There's No Place Like A Dorm Room For The Holidays

Originally published on Tue December 16, 2014 10:52 am

LA Johnson/NPR

It's final exam week for lots of college students. No doubt they're stressed right now, but once they hand in that last paper or take that last test, they're done for the semester. Pack up the suitcase and head home for the holidays.

But for some college students — many of whom are former foster youth — that's not quite what happens.

"I have no for-certain home, that's the thing," says Trudy Greer, a 22-year-old sophomore at Eastern Michigan University in Ypsilanti, Mich. She says she's had a lot of folks at EMU ask her where she lives, curious to know where her home is.

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9:57am

Sat June 22, 2013
Education

School Hopes Talking It Out Keeps Kids From Dropping Out

Originally published on Sat June 22, 2013 6:45 pm

Out-of-school suspensions are on the rise across the country, a troubling statistic when you consider being suspended just once ups a student's chances of dropping out entirely. That's why many districts are hoping to keep kids in school by trying an alternative to suspension.

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