Claudio Sanchez

Former elementary and middle school teacher Claudio Sanchez is the education correspondent for NPR. He focuses on the "three p's" of education reform: politics, policy and pedagogy. Sanchez's reports air regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition.

Sanchez joined NPR in 1989, after serving for a year as executive producer for the El Paso, Texas, based Latin American News Service, a daily national radio news service covering Latin America and the U.S.- Mexico border.

From 1984 to 1988, Sanchez was news and public affairs director at KXCR-FM in El Paso. During this time, he contributed reports and features to NPR's news programs.

In 2008, Sanchez won First Prize in the Education Writers Association's National Awards for Education Reporting, for his series "The Student Loan Crisis." He was named as a Class of 2007 Fellow by the Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard University. In 1985, Sanchez received one of broadcasting's top honors, the Alfred I. duPont-Columbia University Silver Baton, for a series he co-produced, "Sanctuary: The New Underground Railroad." In addition, he has won the Guillermo Martinez-Marquez Award for Best Spot News, the El Paso Press Club Award for Best Investigative Reporting, and was recognized for outstanding local news coverage by the Corporation for Public Broadcasting.

Sanchez is a native of Nogales, Mexico, and a graduate of Northern Arizona University, with post-baccalaureate studies at the University of Arizona in Tucson.

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2:44pm

Tue July 26, 2011
School's Out: America's Dropout Crisis

Teen Fights To Succeed In Rural S.C. Community

Nick Dunn, 16, gave up on school shortly after he lost his father. He lives with his mother, Deborah Gilmore Dunn, in rural South Carolina.
Claudio Sanchez NPR

Third of a five-part series

A fifth of the nation's public school students attend rural schools, but nearly a third of those kids don't graduate. In fact, many schools that researchers have labeled "dropout factories" are in rural communities. No state has more than South Carolina, which has 50. In this state, lots of teenagers just don't think they need a high school diploma.

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5:17am

Tue July 26, 2011
School's Out: America's Dropout Crisis

A Young Mom Resists A Cycle Of Failure

Lauren Ortega, 20, has two young kids and is struggling to finish her GED.
Claudio Sanchez NPR

Second of a five-part series

Of the million or so kids who drop out of school every year, nearly half are girls. They drop out for the same reasons boys do: they skip school, fall behind academically and they're bored. But the single biggest reason girls drop out is because they get pregnant.

Not a day goes by that Lauren Ortega doesn't regret quitting high school. When she turned 15, she got pregnant with her son.

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2:55pm

Mon July 25, 2011
School's Out: America's Dropout Crisis

From Drug Dealing To Diploma, A Teen's Struggle

Patrick Lundvick, 19, dropped out, spent time in jail and is now getting a second chance in South Chicago.
Claudio Sanchez NPR

First of a five-part series

No statistic in education is more damning than the nation's dropout rate. Almost 4 million students start ninth grade every year. One in four won't graduate.

About half of those who drop out every year are black. Most will end up unemployed, and by their mid-30s, six out of 10 will have spent time in prison. In Chicago, one young man dropped out, spent time in jail and is now getting a second chance.

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12:01am

Tue July 19, 2011
Education

Report Details Texas School Disciplinary Policies

Researchers in Texas have released the most comprehensive analysis of school suspension and expulsion policies ever conducted. It's considered groundbreaking because of its scope and detailed examination of disciplinary policies that when misused often put students at greater risk of dropping out or being incarcerated.

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7:27pm

Fri June 10, 2011
Education

R.I. High School's Troubled Year Ends On A Sour Note

For the last year, Central Falls High School in Rhode Island has been under a microscope. Long considered one of the poorest performing high schools in the state, administrators abandoned a proposal to fire all the teachers as long as they agreed to a so-called "transformation" plan.

Now, as the school year winds down, that plan is in shambles

Since August, when the restructuring of Central Falls High School began, 26 teachers have resigned or been fired. Josh Karten is one of them.

"I think I've been let go because I'm not a true believer," Karten says.

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