Chris Arnold

NPR correspondent Chris Arnold is based in Boston. His reports are heard regularly on NPR's award-winning newsmagazines Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and Weekend Edition. He joined NPR in 1996, and was based in San Francisco before moving to Boston in 2001.

Arnold is currently covering the collapse of the housing market. He's reported on how a breakdown in lending standards has led to the highest foreclosure rate in the United States in more than 50 years. For his series on the sub-prime lender Ameriquest, he interviewed former employees from around the country who described widespread fraud at the company's offices. With more than a million people now facing foreclosure, Arnold continues to cover the ongoing crisis and the efforts to resolve it. For this work, Arnold won the Newspaper Guild's 2009 Heywood Broun Award for broadcast journalism. He has also been honored by the Scripps Howard Foundation as a finalist for their National Journalism Award, and he won an Excellence in Financial Journalism Award from N.Y. State's society for CPA's.

Arnold has covered a range of other subjects and stories for NPR – from Katrina recovery in New Orleans and the gulf coast, to immigrant workers in the fishing industry, to a new kind of table saw that won't cut your fingers off. He traveled to Turin, Italy, for NPR's coverage of the 2006 Winter Olympics. He has also followed the dramatic rise in the numbers of teenagers abusing the powerful and highly addictive painkiller Oxycontin – more than 1 out of 20 high school seniors report using the drug.

In the days and months following Sept. 11, 2001 attacks, Arnold reported from New York and contributed to the NPR coverage that won the Overseas Press Club and the George Foster Peabody Awards. He chronicled the recovery effort at Ground Zero, focusing on members of the Port Authority Police department, as they struggled with the deaths of 37 officers - the greatest loss of any police department in U.S. history. Arnold followed the lives of those who lived and worked around ground zero - from bond-traders and Chinatown garment sewers to small business owners - as they sought to put their lives back together again.

Prior to his move to Boston, Arnold traveled the country for NPR doing feature stories on entrepreneurship. His pieces covered technologists, farmers, and family business owners. He also reported on efforts to kindle entrepreneurship in economically disadvantaged areas ranging from inner-city Los Angeles to the Pine Ridge Indian reservation in South Dakota.

Arnold has worked in public radio since 1993. Before joining NPR, he was a freelance reporter working out of San Francisco's NPR Member station, KQED.

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5:03am

Fri December 19, 2014
Your Money

When Nonprofit Hospitals Sue Their Poorest Patients

Originally published on Fri December 19, 2014 10:32 am

Keith Herie is swamped in debt from medical issues he and his wife encountered starting about a decade ago. Heartland hospital is seizing 10 percent of his paycheck and 25 percent of his wife's wages, and has placed a lien on their home.
Steve Hebert for ProPublica

On the eastern edge of St. Joseph, Mo., lies the small city's only hospital, a landmark of modern brick and glass buildings. Everyone in town knows Heartland Regional Medical Center — many residents gave birth to their children here. Many rush here when they get hurt or sick.

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6:21pm

Fri December 12, 2014
Economy

Mortgage Giants Ease Down Payments For First-Time Homebuyers

Originally published on Fri December 12, 2014 8:05 pm

A new directive from the Federal Housing Finance Agency, which regulates mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac, will allow first-time homebuyers to put down as little as 3 percent.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

A federal directive will go into effect Saturday making it easier for some Americans to come up with a down payment to buy a house.

The vast majority of home loans are guaranteed by the government-controlled mortgage giants Fannie Mae and Freddie Mac. The regulator in charge of Fannie and Freddie will allow first-time homebuyers to put down as little as 3 percent.

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6:32pm

Tue November 25, 2014
The Salt

For More Local Turkeys To Hit Holiday Tables, You Need An Abattoir

Originally published on Wed November 26, 2014 11:22 am

The turkeys at Kate Stillman's farm don't have to be loaded on a trailer and driven hundreds of miles this year. They now meet their ends on the same farm where they lived their lives.
Chris Arnold NPR

It's a busy time of year for turkey farmers around the country. And these days, with the growth of the local food movement, small family farms are struggling to keep up with all the orders for birds. So, we went to find out what one New England farmer is doing to get her gobblers from the field to the table. Enter the "abattoir."

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3:33am

Tue November 18, 2014
Business

Firm Accused Of Illegal Practices That Push Families Into Foreclosure

Originally published on Tue December 2, 2014 8:13 pm

Gary Klein is one of the lead attorneys representing homeowners in the case against Ocwen Financial.
Chris Arnold NPR

The fallout from the housing crisis isn't over.

According to Moody's Analytics, there were 700,000 foreclosures last year. And some of those people probably didn't need to lose their homes. Even now, more than six years after the housing crash, lawyers for homeowners say mortgage companies are still making mistakes and foreclosing on homes when they shouldn't be.

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5:18pm

Fri October 3, 2014
Business

New 15-Year Mortgage May Open Homeownership Door For More Buyers

Originally published on Sat October 4, 2014 12:56 pm

Neighborhood Assistance Corporation of America CEO Bruce Marks is offering the first batch of these "wealth building home loans" to homebuyers through his nonprofit organization.
Damian Dovarganes AP

The 30-year mortgage is the foundation of the real estate market largely because it makes housing more affordable. But the truth is, it's a lousy loan for building actual ownership or equity in your home during the first 5 or 7 years, which caused big trouble when housing crashed.

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5:39pm

Fri September 26, 2014
The Two-Way

The 'Bond King' Leaves His $2 Trillion Kingdom

Originally published on Fri September 26, 2014 6:24 pm

Bill Gross
AP

Heavy drama played out this week — and not just on Shonda Rhimes' TV shows.

The bond-investing world was roiled by news that Bill Gross — the man known as "The Bond King" — has abruptly left the huge investment firm he founded in 1971. The departure left a lot of people scratching their heads on Wall Street.

"The natural question is: What's going on at PIMCO?" said David Kotok, chief investment officer at Cumberland Advisors. "There's all kinds of speculation" about why Gross left.

"And the answer is, it's speculation — and so we don't know," Kotok said.

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3:44am

Tue August 26, 2014
Your Money

Many Homeowners Still Qualify For Mortgage Relief

Originally published on Tue August 26, 2014 11:47 am

Mel Watt, director of the Federal Housing Finance Agency, says many homeowners who could qualify to refinance their mortgages under HARP are suspicious.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

The financial crisis pushed millions of Americans from their homes. And housing advocates complain that the government did more to prop up big banks on Wall Street than it did to help average people on Main Street.

But many of those people on Main Street could still qualify for a government program to help them save money by refinancing their mortgages.

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5:45pm

Thu August 14, 2014
Planet Money

Should We Kill The $100 Bill?

Originally published on Tue August 19, 2014 3:02 pm

Noel Celis AFP/Getty Images

Of all the U.S. currency in the world, nearly 80 percent is in $100 bills. That's about a trillion dollars.

Some people want to get rid of the bill altogether. Ken Rogoff, an economist at Harvard University, says the $100 bill helps criminals:

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4:14pm

Fri August 1, 2014
Business

Some Public Pension Funds Making Big Bets On Hedge Funds

Originally published on Thu August 7, 2014 2:28 pm

iStockphoto

Public pension funds have been doing something new in recent years — investing in hedge funds.

Hedge funds are often secretive investment firms led by supposedly supersmart fund managers. Though, sometimes they implode spectacularly — think Long-Term Capital Management. Another prominent firm, Galleon Group, recently got shut down for rampant insider trading.

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4:09pm

Thu July 3, 2014
Economy

In June Jobs Numbers, Signs For Optimism

Originally published on Thu July 3, 2014 6:26 pm

Transcript

ROBERT SIEGEL, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Robert Siegel.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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12:31pm

Sun June 29, 2014
Economy

Housing Market Fake-Outs Stump Economists

Originally published on Sun June 29, 2014 3:13 pm

Homebuilding remains slumped at levels not seen since WWII.
Mike Groll AP

Many homebuyers have been throwing down cold hard cash for their entire house purchase in recent years. Some are baby-boomers who sold a bigger house and are downsizing. Some are investors. Others are from outside the U.S.

"Top of the list in terms of cash sales in the first quarter was Florida, with 64 percent of all sales going to cash buyers, followed by New York, 59 percent; Alabama, 56 percent," says Daren Blomquist, vice president of RealtyTrac, which did a study on cash purchases.

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4:37pm

Wed June 18, 2014
Economy

Sluggish Housing Market A Product Of Millions Of 'Missing Households'

Originally published on Wed June 18, 2014 7:08 pm

NPR Census Bureau

A year ago, the housing market looked like it was finally recovering. Sales and prices were picking up. But then home sales fizzled. Currently, they are down about 7 percent from last spring.

A big part of why housing remains so stunted is that there are more than 2 million "missing households" in the U.S. That's how economists describe the fact that fewer people are striking out on their own to find places to live.

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5:37pm

Thu May 15, 2014
Economy

Missing In The Housing Recovery: New Houses

Originally published on Thu May 15, 2014 8:18 pm

De Desharnais of Ashwood Development in New Hampshire says homebuilding activity for her company has slowed sharply since the housing crash. But she's hopeful that business will pick up.
Chris Arnold NPR

More than five years after the crash, homebuilding is stuck at half its normal level. That's a big drag on the economy. And things aren't looking much better: A report out Thursday shows homebuilder confidence is at its lowest level in a year.

This severe slump in single-family home construction has been going on across the country. We haven't seen anything close to this kind of a long-term construction slump since World War II.

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4:05pm

Tue May 13, 2014
Business

Housing Regulator Has Big Plans In Store For Two Mortgage Titans

Originally published on Tue May 13, 2014 7:26 pm

Copyright 2014 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block.

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3:41am

Fri May 2, 2014
All Tech Considered

Amid The Device Hype, This Startup Is Taking Wearables To Heart

Originally published on Tue May 6, 2014 11:38 am

Steve Jungmann, vice president at the tech startup Quanttus, holds up an early prototype of the biometric sensors the company will use on its wearable products. The current version is much smaller.
Chris Arnold NPR

There's been a lot of talk about wearable devices being the next big thing in the technology world. It's easy for the hype to get ahead of the products, but there's actually some serious innovation going on.

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4:34am

Wed April 23, 2014
Europe

Putin's Chess Moves In Ukraine: Brilliant Tactics, But Bad Strategy?

Originally published on Wed April 23, 2014 10:06 am

Protesters play chess in Independence Square in Kiev last winter. Some would say that Russian President Putin is playing geopolitical chess when it comes to Ukraine.
Dmitry Lovetsky AP

The game of chess is a national pastime in Russia. And you might say that Vladimir Putin is playing a high-stakes game of geopolitical chess when it comes to Ukraine.

Western leaders are plotting how to counter Putin's latest moves with economic sanctions. So to get some insight into what might come next, we talked to an economist who knows Russia — who is also extremely good at chess.

Putin Playing From A Weak Position

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3:42am

Mon April 21, 2014
Your Money

How Do Companies Boost 401(k) Enrollment? Make It Automatic

Originally published on Mon April 21, 2014 2:15 pm

iStockphoto

More Americans are saving for retirement through their employers' 401(k) programs. That's because in recent years they've been given a strong nudge — more companies are automatically enrolling workers in retirement savings programs.

Some firms are also automatically increasing the amount employees contribute. That's just as important, experts say.

And all of this makes a big difference: Without it, millions of Americans don't save at all.

Making Time For Retirement Planning

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4:30pm

Fri April 11, 2014
Economy

Onlookers Show No Worry Over Market's Week In Tumult

Originally published on Fri April 11, 2014 8:13 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Melissa Block.

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

And I'm Audie Cornish. Volatile, that's the kind of week the stock market had. Investors sold off high-flying technology and biotech stocks. Weak bank earnings also added to the sour mix. The NASDAQ is down 8 percent from its peak this year. The S&P 500, it's off 4 percent. But as NPR's Chris Arnold reports, the sell-off hasn't triggered alarm and indicators for the broader economy are mostly positive.

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6:13pm

Thu April 3, 2014
Rethinking Retirement: The Changing Work Landscape

One More Speed Bump For Your Retirement Fund: Basic Human Impulse

Originally published on Thu April 3, 2014 7:34 pm

We hate losing twice as much as we love winning, behavioral researchers say. And that gets us into trouble with financial decisions.
iStockphoto

Saving for retirement is a challenge facing most Americans. Research shows the challenge is made harder by our basic human impulses. We know we should be saving. But we don't. We consistently make bad financial decisions.

One thing that leads us astray is what behavioral economists call "loss aversion." In other words, we hate losing. And that gets in the way of us winning — if winning is making smart financial decisions.

How A Smashed Car Is Like A Smashed Nest Egg

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5:22pm

Wed March 26, 2014
Parallels

How Russia's Annexation Of Crimea Could Hurt Its Economy

Originally published on Thu March 27, 2014 11:05 am

A street vendor in Simferopol, Crimea, sells eggs with the dual currency price tags in Russian rubles and Ukrainian hryvnias. Russia's annexation of Crimea mean it will now have to prop up the peninsula's weak economy.
Dmitry Serebryakov AFP/Getty Images

Russian President Vladimir Putin's swift move to annex Crimea is seen as a sign of strength by many Russians, and it has boosted Putin's popularity at home. But when it comes to Russia's economy, many analysts think Russia's prospects are looking weaker.

In recent days, we've seen Russians rallying in the streets, waving flags and celebrating Putin's move to reclaim Crimea as part of Russia.

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4:44am

Tue March 18, 2014
Your Money

Report: Most Americans Not Putting Enough Away For Retirement

Originally published on Tue March 18, 2014 9:44 am

The stock market surge has given a lift to many retirement portfolios. But a new report finds that most Americans haven't saved nearly enough for the kind of retirement they expect.

5:29pm

Tue March 4, 2014
Economy

Severe Weather Socks The Economy, But Full Impact Is Unclear

Originally published on Tue March 4, 2014 6:31 pm

It's too cold to eat out.
John Moore Getty Images

The economy often absorbs the impact of snowstorms, such as this week's storm, without much trouble, but this winter the weather is doing more damage than usual.

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4:42pm

Thu February 13, 2014
Around the Nation

Grounded And Confounded, Airlines Wait For Storms To Pass

Originally published on Thu February 13, 2014 7:58 pm

The snow and ice storms sweeping the East Coast have been felt not only on the ground but in the air, as well. Airlines are cancelling thousands of flights, and both the companies and their passengers have had to deal with the fallout.

9:43am

Sat February 8, 2014
Economy

January Job Growth Disappoints, But Unemployment Drops

Originally published on Sat February 8, 2014 12:05 pm

The U.S. added just 113,000 jobs in January, instead of the 180,000 analysts had predicted. Despite the anemic gains, the unemployment rate inched down to 6.6 percent, the lowest level since October 2008.

5:06pm

Fri January 24, 2014
Economy

Trouble In Emerging Markets Causes Stocks To Take A Tumble

Originally published on Fri January 24, 2014 7:29 pm

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

Stock prices soared in the past year, but this was a rough week and prices really tumbled today. The Dow lost 318 points, the S&P 500 and the NASDAQ both fell 2.1 percent. This was part of a global sell-off, as investors focus on the growing financial turmoil in the developing world. NPR's Chris Arnold is following this and he joins me now. Chris, the year started off looking like the global economy was more stable. We didn't have a financial crisis unfolding somewhere. So what's going on now?

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5:54pm

Wed January 22, 2014
The Salt

Small-Batch Distilleries Ride The Craft Liquor Wave

Originally published on Wed January 22, 2014 8:01 pm

Evan Parker built the interior space of the distillery himself in a small warehouse near the coast. Parker and his business partner, Mat Perry, have desks overlooking their 400-gallon copper kettle and still.
Chris Arnold NPR

Wherever you live, you're probably not too far from a local microbrewery making beer. Now, the latest trend is the spread of what you might call "micro-boozeries." Craft liquor distilleries are springing up around the country like little wellheads spouting gin, whiskey and rum.

Turkey Shore Distilleries in Ipswich, Mass., is one of them.

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5:31pm

Wed January 15, 2014
Economy

Obama Unveils New Plans To Encourage Manufacturing Jobs

Originally published on Wed January 15, 2014 7:44 pm

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

From NPR News, this is ALL THINGS CONSIDERED. I'm Audie Cornish.

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

And I'm Melissa Block. President Obama has been talking a lot lately about income inequality. Today, he visited a factory in North Carolina and announced new steps that he said would create more good-paying, middle class jobs. He plans to do that by boosting American manufacturing and at the center of that plan is a big idea: a new, federally-funded innovation institute.

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10:05am

Sat January 11, 2014
Economy

December Jobs Report Has Analysts Flummoxed

Originally published on Sat January 11, 2014 12:53 pm

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

This is WEEKEND EDITION from NPR News. I'm Scott Simon. Yesterday's jobs report came as something of a surprise after several months of positive economic news. Employers added just 74,000 jobs. Economists had been expecting businesses to generate nearly three times that many. A few people were heartened by the fact that the unemployment rate fell to 6.7 percent, the lowest since October 2008. As NPR's Chris Arnold reports, the numbers reflect that many of the long-term unemployed have simply given up looking for work.

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6:18pm

Thu January 2, 2014
Economy

For The Unemployed, Ideas To Help Bridge The Gap To Work

Originally published on Thu January 2, 2014 8:01 pm

Job seekers line up to talk to recruiters during a job fair held in Atlanta in May.
John Amis AP

When members of Congress return to work next week, at the top of the "to-do" list is whether to renew emergency unemployment benefits. An extension of the benefits expired at the end of 2013, which means 1.3 million out-of-work Americans are no longer getting unemployment checks.

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5:29am

Fri December 27, 2013
Business

Cars Are Next Frontier For Sharing Services

Originally published on Fri December 27, 2013 9:57 am

Kevin Petrovic, 19, and his business partner, who's also 19, raised about $6 million from venture capitalists in Silicon Valley to launch FlightCar. The company is trying to make its mark with car-sharing for travelers.
Chris Arnold NPR

Following the popularity of companies like Airbnb, which rent out a client's house or apartment to people visiting the area, more companies are trying the idea with cars. Companies like Uber help find someone to drive you around like a taxi. Another will let you rent out your car like a Zipcar while you're at work.

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