Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a producer who works with Morning Edition and NPR.org, coordinating with radio and digital media staff to create Web features that complement stories heard on-air. He also frequently writes original Web pieces.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to writing for its World Cup 2010 blog. Chappell's assignments have included being the lead Web producer on NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as being the Web liaison and producer of the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps project.

Chappell was an integral part of the team that executed a comprehensive redesign of NPR's Web site in 2009. One year later, the site won its first Peabody and the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award, among others.

Drawing from his experience in improving NPR's storytelling ability, he trains both digital media and radio staff in using NPR's digital tools.

Other shows he has worked with include Fresh Air, All Things Considered, Talk of the Nation and Piano Jazz with Marilyn McPartland.

Prior to joining NPR in 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling regions from Asia and Africa to Europe and Latin America.

During the intensive early months of the Iraq War, he coordinated packages and live shots out of Qatar, Israel and Australia. During the war, he set up live interviews and brought in packages to supply content to CNN's global networks.

From 2002-2003, Chappell served as Editor-in-Chief of the Trans-Atlantic Journal, a business and lifestyle monthly geared for expatriate Europeans working and living in the United States.

Chappell's prior work included producing Web pages and editing digital video for CNNSI.com, as well as editing and producing news and features at CNN.com. His entry to CNN came via the network's central library, where he often manned the reference desk.

Chappell's entry into national journalism came after years of writing about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies. A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

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6:08pm

Mon June 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Original Globe-Trotters: Tomatoes, Coffee And Pepper

The original varieties of tomatoes from South America are believed to have been small, like today's cherry tomatoes. Today's large, plump tomatoes, like these at an outdoor market in Berlin, are the result of years of selection.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

All fans of food, facts and geography should consider viewing this Food Chains map, put together by Haisam Hussein for Lapham's Quarterly. If you're into coffee, tomatoes and black pepper, you have little choice but to check it out.

The map shows the far-flung origins of this well-loved food trio — and how their successful spread around the world was due to both trading and imperial conquest.

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4:55pm

Mon June 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Mobile Patent Auction May Bring More Than $1 Billion

The last assets of Nortel Networks, the former high-tech giant, are to be auctioned Monday, as it sells off more than 6,000 patents. The bankrupt Canadian company was once a leader in research and development in the telecom industry.

Google has already aired a $900 million bid for the U.S. and international patents, which focus on mobile video and wireless networks, as well as Internet search. With the starting bid that high, it's likely the final price could easily top $1 billion.

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3:45pm

Mon June 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Feds: States Can't Keep Fingerprints To Themselves

State and local law enforcement agencies cannot opt out of a federal program that uses the agencies' fingerprint samples to enforce U.S. immigration laws, according to federal officials.

One June 1, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo issued an order that the state would no longer participate in the federal Secure Communities program; Illinois took the same step a month earlier.

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2:17pm

Mon June 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Supreme Court Lets $270 Million Tobacco Award Stand

Cigarette makers must pay to help smokers in Louisiana quit their habit, as the U.S. Supreme Court rejected an appeal by tobacco companies in a landmark class-action case.

By refusing to throw out a $270 million jury award, the high court put an end to a case that began in May 1996, when some 500,000 smokers in Louisiana filed a class-action suit against tobacco companies.

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1:13pm

Mon June 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Venus And Serena Williams Lose At Wimbledon

Venus Williams hits a return to Tsvetana Pironkova during their match Monday. With the loss, Williams followed her sister, Serena, out of this year's tournament.
Carl De Souza AFP/Getty Images

Both Serena and Venus Williams were eliminated from Wimbledon's singles tournament Monday, ending a streak of success at the grass event.

Their exit means that for the first time since 2006, neither Williams sister will play in the Wimbledon women's final.

Here's part of a Newscast report NPR's Philip Reeves filed from London:

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12:50pm

Mon June 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Protest Against Italy's High-Speed Rail Line Leaves Dozens Hurt

A demonstrator uses a slingshot during a protest against a planned high-speed rail line running through the Susa valley in Chiomonte, northern Italy.
STR AFP/Getty Images

Upset that a planned high-speed railroad line would disrupt their mountainous environment, around 2,000 demonstrators gathered late Sunday for a protest that erupted into violence early Monday. More than two dozen police officers were hurt, along with four protesters, according to reports.

The demonstrators say that the planned train line, and the extensive tunnels it requires, would damage the Susa Valley, near Turin. The plans call for drilling through nearly 33 miles of mountain. Monday's clash came as workers prepared to drill into the mountainside.

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6:51pm

Fri May 27, 2011
The Two-Way

L.A. School District Tells Librarians: You're Not Teachers

The Los Angeles Unified School District plans to lay off thousands of employees, as it faces a budget shortfall of more than $640 million. The cuts include 85 school librarians — who have been told that they no longer count as teachers. The change in classification would make it easier for the school district to cut the jobs.

The librarians have been facing questions from the district's lawyers, as an administrative law judge seeks to determine if they should be considered as teachers.

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4:49pm

Fri May 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Artists, Start Your Pedals: The Kinetic Grand Championship

Serious race fans are eager for one of the country's most anticipated races of the year, when the Indianapolis 500 starts Sunday. For non-serious race fans, the big event starts Saturday, with the 43rd running of the Kinetic Grand Championship.

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2:24pm

Fri May 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Georgia Farmers Say Immigration Law Keeps Workers Away

In Georgia, farmers have almost everything they need for a successful early harvest, as squash, peppers and peaches are ready for market. But one thing's missing: someone to pick them. Fruit and vegetable farmers blame the state's new immigration reform law, saying it's keeping migrant workers away.

In a Newscast report, Melissa Stiers of Georgia Public Broadcasting spoke to Steven Johnson of South Georgia Produce, who says his crop is ripe on the ground — but there aren't enough people to pick it:

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1:13pm

Fri May 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Gunmen Kill Iraqi Chief Of Anti-Hussein Committee

The head of Iraq's effort to purge Saddam Hussein loyalists from the government was assassinated Thursday night. Ali al-Lami had led the Justice and Accountability Commission since 2004.

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