Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a producer who works with Morning Edition and NPR.org, coordinating with radio and digital media staff to create Web features that complement stories heard on-air. He also frequently writes original Web pieces.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to writing for its World Cup 2010 blog. Chappell's assignments have included being the lead Web producer on NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as being the Web liaison and producer of the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps project.

Chappell was an integral part of the team that executed a comprehensive redesign of NPR's Web site in 2009. One year later, the site won its first Peabody and the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award, among others.

Drawing from his experience in improving NPR's storytelling ability, he trains both digital media and radio staff in using NPR's digital tools.

Other shows he has worked with include Fresh Air, All Things Considered, Talk of the Nation and Piano Jazz with Marilyn McPartland.

Prior to joining NPR in 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling regions from Asia and Africa to Europe and Latin America.

During the intensive early months of the Iraq War, he coordinated packages and live shots out of Qatar, Israel and Australia. During the war, he set up live interviews and brought in packages to supply content to CNN's global networks.

From 2002-2003, Chappell served as Editor-in-Chief of the Trans-Atlantic Journal, a business and lifestyle monthly geared for expatriate Europeans working and living in the United States.

Chappell's prior work included producing Web pages and editing digital video for CNNSI.com, as well as editing and producing news and features at CNN.com. His entry to CNN came via the network's central library, where he often manned the reference desk.

Chappell's entry into national journalism came after years of writing about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies. A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

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11:18am

Thu July 14, 2011
The Two-Way

NASA Holds A Cookout In Space; REM's Michael Stipe Sings For Shuttle

Food packets containing the astronauts' "all-American meal," including (clockwise from top left) corn, chicken, brisket, and beans, along with a lemonade, at right.
Devin Boldt NASA - JSC

With Atlantis paying a visit to the International Space Station on the last mission of the space shuttle program, NASA thought it was a good time for a cookout... in space. The 10 astronauts on the two linked spacecraft will enjoy a special "all-American meal" today.

The meal — or, thermostabilized space food items, in NASAspeak — includes grilled chicken and barbecued beef brisket, along with Southwestern corn, baked beans and (unconfirmed) a Hostess apple pie.

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9:59am

Thu July 14, 2011
The Two-Way

Retail Sales Creep Up; Unemployment Claims Edge Lower

In better numbers than the market had been expecting, retail and food service sales were up in June, according to the Commerce Department. Seasonally adjusted sales were up 0.1 percent. That's a rebound from May, when sales fell by the same amount.

For Newscast, Yuki Noguchi filed this report:

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4:47pm

Wed July 13, 2011
The Two-Way

U.S. Will Play Japan In Women's World Cup Final

Hours after the U.S. team beat France to return to the Women's World Cup final for the first time since 1999, Japan beat Sweden, 3-1, in their semifinal match. The victory sets up the first game between the American women and the Japanese women in the 2011 tournament.

Sunday's title game is scheduled to begin at 2:45 p.m., ET.

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12:13pm

Wed July 13, 2011
The Two-Way

U.S. Scores First Against France In World Cup Semifinal

American Heather O'Reilly fed a perfect pass to Lauren Cheney, and the result was a score from close range in the ninth minute, as the U.S. women's national team got an early edge over France in the semifinals of the FIFA Women's World Cup.

In the game's early minutes, play was fast and spirited, each team hoping to get that all-important first goal.

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10:14am

Wed July 13, 2011
The Two-Way

Developing: Explosions In Mumbai's Market Areas

Update at 10:23: Deaths Reported; Unexploded Bomb Found

NDTV reports that at least 10 people have died in three attacks in Mumbai, with more than a dozen taken to the hospital. From NDTV:

One explosion, in a car at a bus stop in Dadar West, has been confirmed. A police officer said there might have been an explosive in a meter box behind a hoarding at Khau gali, a street filled with eateries at Zaveri Bazaar.

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10:00am

Wed July 13, 2011
The Two-Way

China Says It Closed 1.4 Million Websites In 2010

The Internet, as you may have noticed, just seems to keep on growing. But not in China — in fact, Chinese officials said that the country had 41 percent fewer sites at the end of 2010 than existed one year earlier — mostly the result of government restrictions.

Worldwide, there were a reported 255 million websites at the end of 2010. That number, drawn from research conducted by Royal Pingdom, reflects a yearly gain of 21.4 million sites.

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6:49pm

Tue July 12, 2011
The Two-Way

Methuselah, A Well-Loved Tortoise, Dies At 130 In South Dakota

Methuselah, a giant tortoise whose life began in the Galapagos Islands 130 years ago, has died in Rapid City, S.D. Since 1954, the huge animal has been a star attraction at Reptile Gardens, where officials estimate that he posed for photographs with tens of thousands of visitors, many of them children.

Methuselah began his life in 1881. Here's a sampling of what else was going on that year:

  • James Garfield became president.
  • Billy the Kid escaped from jail and was killed by Pat Garrett in New Mexico.
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5:53pm

Tue July 12, 2011
The Two-Way

Mississippi Sues BP Oil Fund Administrator, Seeking Access To Records

Mississippi Attorney General Jim Hood is suing BP oil spill fund administrator Kenneth Feinberg, in an attempt to force open the books at the Gulf Coast Claims Facility.

Here's part of a Newscast report filed by Jeffery Hess with Mississippi Public Broadcasting:

Hood says he has heard hundreds of complaints from coast residents about how claims have been distributed, and has been denied access to Claims Facility documents.

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3:50pm

Tue July 12, 2011
The Two-Way

Truck Crash Releases 14 Million Angry Bees, And Honey, On Highway

The weekend did not end well for fire and police personnel near Island Park, Idaho, where 14 million bees went berserk after a semi wrecked on a highway Sunday afternoon. The truck was carrying more than 400 hives; crews didn't finished cleaning what was called a river of honey off the road until late Monday.

The bees swarmed in black clouds that kept the truck driver and rescue personnel in their vehicles until they could put on protective gear. In the end, it seems that many of the bees were killed after being sprayed by firefighting foam.

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2:25pm

Tue July 12, 2011
The Two-Way

Police Release Batch Of Complaints From Michele Bachmann, Staff

Rep. Michele Bachmann is the Republican front-runner in Iowa, and she's drawing the kind of wide coverage to prove it. Politico compares her to Howard Dean; ABC reports that her husband's counseling firm may have urged gay patients to pray their way straight.

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12:59pm

Tue July 12, 2011
The Two-Way

Scrutiny Grows For India's Spiritual Leaders, And Their Wealth

The discovery that the vaults of a Hindu temple held a treasure worth $22 billion shocked many in India and beyond — especially because the vaults were last opened some 150 years ago. Now the Washington Post is reporting on the ability of India's "godmen" to accumulate money from millions of followers.

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1:10pm

Mon July 11, 2011
The Two-Way

U.S. Women 'Haven't Won Anything,' Wambach Says; France Is Next

U.S. forward Abby Wambach heads in the equalizer past Brazil's defender Daiane and goalkeeper Andreia Sunday in Dresden.
Robert Michael AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. women's national team could be forgiven for soaking in the glory of their gut-wrenching win over Brazil in the Women's World Cup quarterfinals. The tight game electrified fans, driving many to parse the game's twists and turns, and it's dramatic final moments, on Twitter.

But Abby Wambach — whose head forcefully redirected a crossing pass from Megan Rapinoe in the 122nd minute to send the game to penalty kicks — says the U.S. team isn't satisfied.

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5:33pm

Fri July 8, 2011
The Two-Way

U.S. Women Likely To Wear 'Black Widow' Uniforms Against Brazil

Originally published on Fri July 8, 2011 6:31 pm

A Good Luck Charm? The U.S. women's team is undefeated when wearing all black since the uniforms were introduced on May 14. In that game against Japan, Ali Krieger battled for control of the ball.
Jamie Sabau Getty Images

The U.S. women's soccer team will be looking for a spark when they play Brazil Sunday in an elimination match of the 2011 FIFA Women's World Cup. One source of inspiration could be their new all-black uniforms, which the U.S. team reportedly plans to wear for the first time in Germany.

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3:14pm

Wed July 6, 2011
The Two-Way

U.S. Surrenders First Two Goals In Women's World Cup

Nilla Fischer of Sweden and America's Abby Wambach battle for the ball during their Group C match in the Women's World Cup. Sweden took an early 1-0 advantage in the match.
Martin Rose Getty Images

UPDATE at 3:20 p.m. ET: Sweden has scored after another U.S. penalty, as Nilla Fischer's free kick was deflected and got past Hope Solo.

The U.S. women's soccer team faces Sweden in the FIFA Women's World Cup Wednesday, trying to wrap up group play by winning Group C. But the Americans surrendered two goals in the first half.

Sweden went ahead 1-0 in the 14th minute, after defender Amy LePeilbet was given a yellow card for bringing down a Swedish player just inside the penalty box.

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1:34pm

Thu June 30, 2011
The Two-Way

Women's World Cup 2011: A Quick Guide

Soccer fans attend the women's World Cup opener between Germany and Canada. In Germany, the game drew a TV audience of more than 18 million, or a quarter of the country's population — better stats than some men's matches garner.
AFP AFP/Getty Images

The FIFA Women's World Cup is in full swing in Germany, where the tournament's 16 teams are vying for a spot in the title game, slated for July 17.

First held in 1991, the event is a relatively new international tournament. Like the men's version, it's held every four years. Here are a few more facts, to help you get acquainted:

  • Germany and the U.S. have won the Cup twice; Norway has won once.
  • Brazil's best finish is second place (2007).
  • The U.S. last won the tournament in 1999.
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1:36pm

Tue June 28, 2011
The Two-Way

U.S. Gets First Goal Of 2011 Women's World Cup Against N. Korea

Lauren Cheney, left, and Carli Lloyd, right, of the U.S. battle for the ball with Yun Mi Jo of Korea DPR in their opening Group C match of the FIFA Women's World Cup at Rudolf-Harbig-Stadion in Dresden, Germany.
Boris Streubel Getty Images

The U.S. women started group play in the FIFA Women's World Cup with a tight, tense game against North Korea Tuesday in Dresden, Germany. Lauren Cheney shattered a 0-0 tie with a header that found the corner of the goal, nearly 10 minutes into the second half. The ball was delivered from deep in the left corner by Abby Wambach.

With the U.S. women in all white and the Korean women in all red, the game was scoreless in the first half, with the North Koreans often dropping a defender into the midfield to frustrate the U.S. offense.

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7:51pm

Mon June 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Workers Satisficing Careers By Cobbling Jobs Together

It can be tough finding a regular job in the tough economy that many Americans are enduring. To earn a living, some folks are working multiple part-time jobs — as many as six or eight of them. The New York Times profiled some of those workers Sunday.

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6:40pm

Mon June 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Waters Begin to Recede In Minot; Wait Could Be Weeks

Air Force SSgt. Chris Reed, holding his son Colby, and his wife, Tracy, with son Wesley, seek help at the FEMA office. The couple is looking for housing after their home flooded.
Scott Olson Getty Images

In Minot, N.D., floodwaters are finally starting to recede into the Souris River, according to a National Guard spokesman who talked to the AP. But in the town, 4,000 homes have been damaged by the river, and thousands of residents remain homeless.

Flooding reached a peak over the weekend in Minot, and the water level had fallen by a reported 6 inches by Monday afternoon. But that means other communities downriver — such as Velva and Sawyer — are now under threat of flooding.

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6:08pm

Mon June 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Original Globe-Trotters: Tomatoes, Coffee And Pepper

The original varieties of tomatoes from South America are believed to have been small, like today's cherry tomatoes. Today's large, plump tomatoes, like these at an outdoor market in Berlin, are the result of years of selection.
Sean Gallup Getty Images

All fans of food, facts and geography should consider viewing this Food Chains map, put together by Haisam Hussein for Lapham's Quarterly. If you're into coffee, tomatoes and black pepper, you have little choice but to check it out.

The map shows the far-flung origins of this well-loved food trio — and how their successful spread around the world was due to both trading and imperial conquest.

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4:55pm

Mon June 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Mobile Patent Auction May Bring More Than $1 Billion

The last assets of Nortel Networks, the former high-tech giant, are to be auctioned Monday, as it sells off more than 6,000 patents. The bankrupt Canadian company was once a leader in research and development in the telecom industry.

Google has already aired a $900 million bid for the U.S. and international patents, which focus on mobile video and wireless networks, as well as Internet search. With the starting bid that high, it's likely the final price could easily top $1 billion.

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3:45pm

Mon June 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Feds: States Can't Keep Fingerprints To Themselves

State and local law enforcement agencies cannot opt out of a federal program that uses the agencies' fingerprint samples to enforce U.S. immigration laws, according to federal officials.

One June 1, New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo issued an order that the state would no longer participate in the federal Secure Communities program; Illinois took the same step a month earlier.

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2:17pm

Mon June 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Supreme Court Lets $270 Million Tobacco Award Stand

Cigarette makers must pay to help smokers in Louisiana quit their habit, as the U.S. Supreme Court rejected an appeal by tobacco companies in a landmark class-action case.

By refusing to throw out a $270 million jury award, the high court put an end to a case that began in May 1996, when some 500,000 smokers in Louisiana filed a class-action suit against tobacco companies.

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1:13pm

Mon June 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Venus And Serena Williams Lose At Wimbledon

Venus Williams hits a return to Tsvetana Pironkova during their match Monday. With the loss, Williams followed her sister, Serena, out of this year's tournament.
Carl De Souza AFP/Getty Images

Both Serena and Venus Williams were eliminated from Wimbledon's singles tournament Monday, ending a streak of success at the grass event.

Their exit means that for the first time since 2006, neither Williams sister will play in the Wimbledon women's final.

Here's part of a Newscast report NPR's Philip Reeves filed from London:

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12:50pm

Mon June 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Protest Against Italy's High-Speed Rail Line Leaves Dozens Hurt

A demonstrator uses a slingshot during a protest against a planned high-speed rail line running through the Susa valley in Chiomonte, northern Italy.
STR AFP/Getty Images

Upset that a planned high-speed railroad line would disrupt their mountainous environment, around 2,000 demonstrators gathered late Sunday for a protest that erupted into violence early Monday. More than two dozen police officers were hurt, along with four protesters, according to reports.

The demonstrators say that the planned train line, and the extensive tunnels it requires, would damage the Susa Valley, near Turin. The plans call for drilling through nearly 33 miles of mountain. Monday's clash came as workers prepared to drill into the mountainside.

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6:51pm

Fri May 27, 2011
The Two-Way

L.A. School District Tells Librarians: You're Not Teachers

The Los Angeles Unified School District plans to lay off thousands of employees, as it faces a budget shortfall of more than $640 million. The cuts include 85 school librarians — who have been told that they no longer count as teachers. The change in classification would make it easier for the school district to cut the jobs.

The librarians have been facing questions from the district's lawyers, as an administrative law judge seeks to determine if they should be considered as teachers.

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4:49pm

Fri May 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Artists, Start Your Pedals: The Kinetic Grand Championship

Serious race fans are eager for one of the country's most anticipated races of the year, when the Indianapolis 500 starts Sunday. For non-serious race fans, the big event starts Saturday, with the 43rd running of the Kinetic Grand Championship.

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2:24pm

Fri May 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Georgia Farmers Say Immigration Law Keeps Workers Away

In Georgia, farmers have almost everything they need for a successful early harvest, as squash, peppers and peaches are ready for market. But one thing's missing: someone to pick them. Fruit and vegetable farmers blame the state's new immigration reform law, saying it's keeping migrant workers away.

In a Newscast report, Melissa Stiers of Georgia Public Broadcasting spoke to Steven Johnson of South Georgia Produce, who says his crop is ripe on the ground — but there aren't enough people to pick it:

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1:13pm

Fri May 27, 2011
The Two-Way

Gunmen Kill Iraqi Chief Of Anti-Hussein Committee

The head of Iraq's effort to purge Saddam Hussein loyalists from the government was assassinated Thursday night. Ali al-Lami had led the Justice and Accountability Commission since 2004.

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