Bill Chappell

Bill Chappell is a producer who works with Morning Edition and, coordinating with radio and digital media staff to create Web features that complement stories heard on-air. He also frequently writes original Web pieces.

Chappell's work at NPR has ranged from being the site's first full-time homepage editor to writing for its World Cup 2010 blog. Chappell's assignments have included being the lead Web producer on NPR's trip to Asia's Grand Trunk Road, as well as being the Web liaison and producer of the Peabody Award-winning StoryCorps project.

Chappell was an integral part of the team that executed a comprehensive redesign of NPR's Web site in 2009. One year later, the site won its first Peabody and the National Press Foundation's Excellence in Online Journalism award, among others.

Drawing from his experience in improving NPR's storytelling ability, he trains both digital media and radio staff in using NPR's digital tools.

Other shows he has worked with include Fresh Air, All Things Considered, Talk of the Nation and Piano Jazz with Marilyn McPartland.

Prior to joining NPR in 2003, Chappell worked on the Assignment Desk at CNN International, handling regions from Asia and Africa to Europe and Latin America.

During the intensive early months of the Iraq War, he coordinated packages and live shots out of Qatar, Israel and Australia. During the war, he set up live interviews and brought in packages to supply content to CNN's global networks.

From 2002-2003, Chappell served as Editor-in-Chief of the Trans-Atlantic Journal, a business and lifestyle monthly geared for expatriate Europeans working and living in the United States.

Chappell's prior work included producing Web pages and editing digital video for, as well as editing and producing news and features at His entry to CNN came via the network's central library, where he often manned the reference desk.

Chappell's entry into national journalism came after years of writing about movies, restaurants and music for alternative weeklies. A holder of bachelor's degrees in English and History from the University of Georgia, he attended graduate school for English Literature at the University of South Carolina.

In a development that could give Spain sorely needed momentum on its path to forming a new government, Pedro Sanchez resigned as the leader of the main opposition Socialist Party. Sanchez had promised to step down if the party voted to end his ban on enabling a coalition conservative-led government.

The tally in Saturday's vote was 133-109; according to El Mundo, the vote was held by a show of hands, after critics dismissed the use of a ballot box as an attempt to rig the vote.

It may weaken somewhat as it spins in the Caribbean, — but forecasters still say that Hurricane Matthew will likely bring winds topping 100 mph when it makes landfall. Parts of Haiti, Cuba and Jamaica are on alert, as Matthew's maximum sustained winds were measured at 140 mph Saturday afternoon.

Hurricane conditions could hit Jamaica and Haiti by Monday, with tropical storm conditions possible by late Sunday, the National Hurricane Center says. It adds that hurricane conditions could also hit eastern Cuba by Monday night.

Aleppo, Syria's divided city where airstrikes hit two rebel-held hospitals earlier this week, is under renewed attack, as reports emerge that Russian and Syrian forces are using incendiary phosphorous munitions as part of an intensified shelling and bombing campaign.

It's one of the most famous delis in the U.S., if not the world; its food has been called "nearly orgasmic" — but now comes word that New York's famed Carnegie Delicatessen will be closing its doors at the end of 2016.

In the TV comedy version of Portland, Ore., the bookstore is called Women and Women First. In real life, it's In Other Words — and the shop is using frank terms to say the Portlandia show is no longer welcome to film there. The feminist store and community center faults the show's depiction of men dressing as women, its treatment of store staff, and its role in gentrification and race relations.

Saying that Alabama Chief Justice Roy Moore violated judicial ethics when he ordered judges not to respect the U.S. Supreme Court's landmark ruling on same-sex marriage, Alabama's Court of the Judiciary suspended Moore for the rest of his term in office.

One week after a House panel highlighted sexual harassment claims at Yosemite National Park and elsewhere in the National Park Service, the superintendent of Yosemite, Don Neubacher is stepping down, the agency says.

According to NPS regional spokesman Andrew Munoz, the agency "acted to move Don Neubacher from his role" leading the park to protect the integrity of its investigation into allegations of a hostile work environment at Yosemite.

Days after he agreed to forfeit outstanding stock awards worth about $41 million over his bank's creation of millions of unauthorized customer accounts, Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf is facing more questions on Capitol Hill.

"We should have done more sooner," Stumpf told members of the House Financial Services Committee, adding that he and Wells Fargo will keep working on the problem.

It's believed to be a first — and it certainly came as a surprise: Ancient Roman coins have been found in the ruins of a castle in Okinawa, Japan, that dates to the 12th and 15th centuries. The copper coins were found in 2013; X-ray analysis shows that they bear an image of Constantine the Great.

The U.S. trails Switzerland and Singapore in economic competitiveness in a new global index that finds America's infrastructure, health system and primary education are all lagging. The World Economic Forum's index also notes three U.S. strengths: Its large market, financial sophistication and labor efficiency.

As officials in Charlotte, N.C., consider when, if, and how to release video of the police shooting of Keith Lamont Scott earlier this week, lawyers for the family have released what they say is eyewitness video taken by Scott's wife.

Betty Shelby, the Tulsa Police Department officer who shot and killed Terence Crutcher, is being charged with first-degree manslaughter in the case, Tulsa County District Attorney Steve Kunzweiler says.

Kunzweiler announced the charge Thursday afternoon, six days after Crutcher died in a controversial encounter that was captured on video by a police helicopter camera and dashboard cameras.

Providing details on a large hacking case, Yahoo says it believes "information associated with at least 500 million user accounts was stolen." The company says its investigation suggests the stolen data doesn't include payment and bank account information, which it says are stored in a different system.

Yahoo suspects that a "state-sponsored actor" performed the hack, stealing users' account information from the company network late in 2014.

Ruling on a lawsuit filed by a state's Democratic attorney general against its Republican governor, the Kentucky Supreme Court says Gov. Matt Bevin doesn't have the authority to unilaterally slice money out of a state university's budget.

From member station WUKY in Lexington:

The breathtaking sadness of seeing a boy suffering amid Syria's civil war has prompted a breathtaking offer of hospitality and kindness.

The sight of shell-shocked 5-year-old Omran Daqneesh, who was wounded in an airstrike in Aleppo, left many people speechless last month. It also prompted a New York boy named Alex to write to President Obama with a simple request: "Can you please go get him" so Omran can become part of Alex's family?

A black man who runs from police shouldn't necessarily be considered suspicious — and merely might be trying to avoid "the recurring indignity of being racially profiled," the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court says.

Facing off with the CEO whose massive bank appropriated customers' information to create millions of bogus accounts, Sen. Elizabeth Warren, D-Mass., had sharp questions Tuesday for Wells Fargo CEO John Stumpf. She said Stumpf made millions of dollars in the "scam," telling him, "You should resign ... and you should be criminally investigated."

The video is disturbing and prompts many questions — and that's how the police see it. The family of Terence Crutcher, who was shot dead by police Friday, says the footage should lead to criminal charges against the officer who killed an unarmed man.

The Justice Department has begun a parallel investigation into possible civil rights charges related to Crutcher's death, U.S. Attorney Danny Williams Sr. said Monday. He promised "to seek justice on behalf of this family, and for the public."

The video is disturbing and prompts many questions — and that's how the police see it. The family of Terence Crutcher, who was shot dead by police Friday, says the footage should lead to criminal charges against the officer who killed an unarmed man.

The Justice Department has begun a parallel investigation into possible civil rights charges related to Crutcher's death, U.S. Attorney Danny Williams Sr. said Monday. He promised "to seek justice on behalf of this family, and for the public."

Updated at 6:30 p.m. ET with charges

The suspect in the New York and New Jersey bombs has been charged with five counts of attempted murder of a law enforcement officer. Prosecutors in Union County, N.J., say Ahmad Khan Rahami has also been charged with two weapons crimes. His bail has been set at $5.2 million.

Our original post:

Russia's parliamentary elections brought a landslide win for President Vladimir Putin's United Russia and its allies, in a vote that gives Putin a free hand in the country he first led in 2000. At least one incident of ballot-stuffing was caught on camera; officials say results from that station won't be counted.

The Pentagon says the militant known as "Dr. Wa'il", the Islamic State's minister of propaganda and one of its most senior leaders, was killed by a coalition airstrike near the group's de facto capital, Raqqah, Syria.

The news comes weeks after ISIS said its head of propaganda was killed in the Syrian city of Aleppo.

What happens when two talented 36-year-olds face off against 30 8-year-olds on a soccer field? We now know the answer to that question, thanks to the LA Galaxy's Robbie Keane and midfielder Steven Gerrard.

The match was the finale in the LA Galaxy's "Ridiculous Soccer Challenge" series; we also found it to be good fun as we reach the end of a week's worth of serious news.

Arizona's attorney general will issue new guidance about the state's immigration enforcement law, as part of an agreement with a coalition of immigrant rights groups that in return will drop their legal challenges to the controversial Senate Bill 1070 that took effect in 2010.

Several key provisions of the law were thrown out back in 2012, when the U.S. Supreme Court rejected three elements of SB 1070.

News that late librarian Robert Morin left the University of New Hampshire $4 million has been hailed as a symbol of Morin's dedication and generosity. But the school's decision to spend $1 million of that money on a new video scoreboard for the football stadium is being criticized.

Days after the Florida mosque that had been attended by the Orlando Pulse nightclub gunman was set on fire, the sheriff's department of St. Lucie County says it has arrested Joseph Michael Schreiber, 32. Officers cited tips from the public and Schreiber owning a motorcycle like one seen on surveillance video.

"An examination of Schreiber's social media account also shows multiple anti-Islamic posts and comments," Major David Thompson of the sheriff's office says.

An undercover FBI agent who impersonated a journalist to find out who was making bomb threats to a high school near Seattle did not violate federal policy at the time, a Justice Department watchdog says. Since the 2007 incident, the policy has been stiffened but could still allow such a ploy.

Police in Columbus, Ohio, say that officers who responded to a reported armed robbery Wednesday night located and pursued young suspects — and when one pulled what looked like a gun, an officer shot him multiple times, killing him. That suspect, Tyree King, 13, had a BB gun with a laser site, police say.

"This is very realistic," Sgt. Rich Weiner said of the BB gun, according to member station WOSU.

Saying it wants to make football safer for current and future athletes, the NFL is pledging to spend $100 million for "independent medical research and engineering advancements." A main goal will be to prevent and treat head injuries.

Announcing the pledge Wednesday, NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell said it is in addition to the $100 million the league already committed toward medical research of brain injuries and chronic traumatic encephalopathy, the progressive degenerative disease that has been found in football players.

In a move that mirrors the NCAA's decision to pull championship events from North Carolina, the Atlantic Coast Conference says it is relocating all upcoming major championships, citing the state's HB2 law that limits civil rights protections for LGBT people.

With the move, the Greensboro, N.C.-based ACC is taking its marquee events out of the state in which it was founded back in the 1950s.