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5:13am

Tue July 28, 2015
Sports

Cardinals Hire Jen Welter, Possibly NFL's First Female Coach

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 2:18 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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DAVID GREENE, HOST:

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5:13am

Tue July 28, 2015
NPR Ed

The 'Swim Whisperer' Teaches Kids To Be Water-Safe

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 5:35 pm

Cooper is known as the Swim Whisperer. He's been teaching swimming full-time since 1995.
Elissa Nadworny NPR

If you looked at the children at the edge of Conrad Cooper's pool, you'd think you were watching an ad for something. Jell-O, maybe. Or a breakfast cereal kids like. They're that cute.

They're lined up on the steps in the shallow end, 10 little ones, ranging from age 2 to 5. The boys are in board trunks, many wearing rash-guard shirts like the weekend surfers they might become years from now. The girls wear bright one-piece suits and two-pieces that show their childish potbellies.

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5:13am

Tue July 28, 2015
Shots - Health News

How Finns Make Sports Part Of Everyday Life

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 1:09 pm

A Helsinki bomb shelter now serves as a shooting range for an archery club.
Rae Ellen Bichell for NPR

In Helsinki, sports facilities pop up all over the place, sometimes in some pretty odd nooks and crannies. One bomb shelter hosts an archery club, another an underground swimming pool and an ice hockey rink.

Though they hardly need it, there's a national plan in Finland to get people to sit less. It reminds them, in fact, that, "Under the Constitution ... physical activity is a basic cultural right."

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5:13am

Tue July 28, 2015
Around the Nation

The Demise Of Old-Style Demolition Derby

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 1:58 pm

Travis Moyer (center) drives the car that he built for the demolition derby in Kansas.
Frank Morris KCUR

Americans have been intentionally ramming cars into each other for sport for decades. And at this time of year, fans crowd into county fairs to see battered, souped-up cars bash each other to pieces.

This steel equivalent of blood sport draws a passionate following, and the drivers say it is deeply addicting.

"There's nothing better," says John Green, a demolition derby driver at a recent fair in Franklin County, Kan. "A lot of people say they would do it, but until you get in there and do it you never know the real feeling."

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5:13am

Tue July 28, 2015
The Salt

Squeezed By Drought, California Farmers Switch To Less Thirsty Crops

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 7:41 am

Gary Broomell and his daughter, Debbie, pose behind a sign on their ranch in San Diego County. Their family has been growing citrus for generations, but lately, it's been hard staying in the black growing oranges, so they started a vineyard a few years ago.
Lesley McClurg Capital Public Radio

Water scarcity is driving California farmers to plant different crops. Growers are switching to more profitable, less-thirsty fruits, vegetables and nuts.

Nowhere is this truer than San Diego County, where water prices are some of the highest in the state.

Grapefruit trees shade the entrance to Triple B Ranches winery in northern San Diego County. The tasting room is a converted kitchen festooned with country knick knacks.

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5:13am

Tue July 28, 2015
NPR Ed

The Struggle To Breathe Life Back Into Empty Schools

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 2:37 pm

Eliot Elementary in St. Louis, Mo., closed 10 years ago. The building remains empty.
Tim Lloyd/ St. Louis Public Radio

Virginia Savage lives in a part of north St. Louis, Mo., that's filled with vacant buildings, including Marshall Elementary. It has been closed for years now, and vines crawl into the building's smashed-out windows. The playground is littered with empty liquor bottles.

Savage went to school at Marshall as a young girl, and now she sees bigger problems beyond all those blemishes: "Drug dealers, drug users, eyesore. That's what I see."

In St. Louis, the student enrollment is one-fourth the size it was in the 1960s. That drop has led the district to close 30 or so schools.

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3:33am

Tue July 28, 2015
Business

Tired Of The Big City? Consider Telecommuting From Montana

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 2:00 pm

Greg Gianforte is distributing a brochure urging workers to "come home to Montana" and telework from there.
Marianne Wiest BetterMontanaJobs.com

Most local economic development schemes focus on creating jobs. Many offer incentives to startup companies, or try to lure existing companies to relocate.

But a campaign in Montana is turning that on its head. It's not trying to recruit companies but rather employees to come to the sparsely populated state and telecommute.

David Blackburn works for a financial services firm in Jersey City, N.J. He and his wife both have six-figure incomes, but real estate in the New York City area is so expensive that they have to live kind of far from their jobs.

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6:40pm

Mon July 27, 2015
Around the Nation

Boy Scouts To Announce End Of Ban On Gay Leaders

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 7:24 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

The executive board of the Boy Scouts of America has ended its outright ban on gay scout leaders today, but there's a caveat. NPR's Wade Goodwyn reports that the resolution allows each scout unit to decide for itself whether to accept gay adult leaders.

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6:40pm

Mon July 27, 2015
All Tech Considered

Narcissistic, Maybe. But Is There More To The Art Of The Selfie?

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 11:09 am

To selfie, or not to selfie?
iStockphoto

The smartphone has given us a whole new genre of cultural expression: the selfie.

If you're into selfies, it's safe to say you've probably taken one, and maybe wished you didn't have those dark circles under your eyes.

Now there are plenty of apps out there to fix that.

But whether you think your selfies can be elevated to art may depend on how much effort you are willing to put into them.

A Personal Brand Boost

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6:40pm

Mon July 27, 2015
Around the Nation

The 'Shock Of Confinement': The Grim Reality Of Suicide In Jail

Originally published on Wed July 29, 2015 2:01 pm

A cell at New York's Rikers Island jail. About 1,000 people die in American jails every year, and about a third of those are suicides.
Seth Wenig AP

The case of Sandra Bland has raised anger and suspicions nationwide since she was found dead in a jail cell in Hempstead, Texas, two weeks ago. Bland's family and supporters have rejected the medical examiner's finding of suicide, and the criminal district attorney for Waller County, Texas, says he's recruited two outside lawyers to assist in the investigation of her death. The local investigation has been reviewed by the FBI, and local prosecutors have pledged to bring the case to a grand jury next month.

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6:40pm

Mon July 27, 2015
U.S.

With Religious Services, Immigrant Detainees Find 'Calmness'

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 7:24 pm

Detainees at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Wash., gather for a Sikh prayer service.
Liz Jones KUOW

When undocumented immigrants move through government-run detention centers in the U.S., it can take months before they find out if they'll be deported or allowed to stay in the country.

During this long wait, many become frustrated. And some turn to religion.

It's the job of the in-house chaplain to help connect detainees to religious services.

Keith Henderson, chaplain at the Northwest Detention Center in Tacoma, Wash., says, "I love it. I love the job," partly, he says, because he likes challenges.

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5:10pm

Mon July 27, 2015
It's All Politics

Could Joe Biden Get 'Ready For Biden'?

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 2:11 pm

Vice President Joe Biden addresses a progressive youth summit in Washington, D.C., earlier this month.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

Sitting vice presidents are usually seen as political heirs to the White House. But not this year.

With Hillary Clinton surging to the front of the Democratic field and the sudden rise of Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders, Joe Biden has largely been an afterthought.

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5:09pm

Mon July 27, 2015
Parallels

For Greece's Farmers, Growing Pressure To Be More Competitive

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 2:36 pm

A worker picks clingstone peaches in Greece. Most of the country's farms are small and family owned. Production costs can be high, and Greek farmers have had trouble competing internationally.
Konstantinos Tsakalidis Bloomberg via Getty Images

Nick Lapatas spent 18 years living in Chicago. Then he returned home to Greece and bought a small farm. Today he and his son sell tomatoes in an open-air market in Athens. Despite the depressed economy and cheaper imports from Bulgaria and Albania, he's doing OK.

"I don't know how, but we are making some money," he says. "Now, what is going to happen a month from now, I don't know."

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4:57pm

Mon July 27, 2015
Economy

As Brazil's Economy Goes In Reverse, Illusion Of Prosperity Fades With It

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 7:24 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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4:57pm

Mon July 27, 2015
Goats and Soda

Fleeing To Haiti, They Put Their Faith In 'God And Government'

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 12:21 pm

Children play among the tents of Parc Cadeau, one of the camps set up in Haiti for migrants who've left the Dominican Republic after being stripped of their citizenship.
Peter Granitz for NPR

Marie Etyse left two of her children behind.

She's 29, a widow and has five kids. She has lived in a town in the Dominican Republic for the past nine years.

Like many Haitian migrants, she faces deportation after a law stripped her of her citizenship. Formal deportation could start as early as Aug. 1, so many of these people have already fled to settlement camps in Haiti, which shares the island of Hispaniola with the DR.

Etyse tried to get the required papers to stay in the country.

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4:53pm

Mon July 27, 2015
The Two-Way

Boston's 2024 Olympic Bid Is Over

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 8:19 am

Boston Mayor Martin Walsh speaks at a news conference last month. He and the USOC announced Monday that his city is no longer in the running to host the 2024 Olympics.
Elise Amendola AP

It's official. The 2024 Olympic Games will not take place in Boston.

The Associated Press reports that the U.S. Olympic Committee "severed ties" with Boston on Monday. In a statement, Boston Mayor Martin J. Walsh said, "I strongly believe that bringing the Olympic Games back to the United States would be good for our country and would have brought long-term benefits to Boston." He continued, "However, no benefit is so great that it is worth handing over the financial future of our City and our citizens were rightly hesitant to be supportive as a result."

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4:23pm

Mon July 27, 2015
The Salt

Cheap Eats: A Cookbook For Eating Well On A Food Stamp Budget

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 12:26 pm

The Savory Summer Cobbler from the Cheap and Good cookbook features seasonal vegetables under a peppery biscuit crust.
Leanne Brown

Editor's note: A version of this story was first published Aug. 1, 2014.

When Leanne Brown moved to New York from Canada to earn a master's in food studies at New York University, she couldn't help noticing that Americans on a tight budget were eating a lot of processed foods heavy in carbs.

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3:41pm

Mon July 27, 2015
The Two-Way

Malaysia, Cuba Taken Off U.S. Human Trafficking Blacklist

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 2:19 pm

The U.S. State Department has taken Malaysia and Cuba off its list of worst human trafficking offenders — which many human rights advocates and U.S. lawmakers say has more to do with politics than facts on the ground.

The department's latest annual Trafficking in Persons Report also upgraded Uzbekistan and Angola, while Belize, Belarus and South Sudan were among 18 nations downgraded this year. Russia, Iran, Eritrea and Algeria are some of the countries that have been on the blacklist for years.

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3:39pm

Mon July 27, 2015
The Two-Way

Major League Soccer Gambles On Star Power Of Aging Foreign Players

New York City FC's Andrea Pirlo warms up before an MLS soccer match against Orlando City SC on Sunday at Yankee Stadium.
Jason DeCrow AP

"We want Pirlo! We want Pirlo! We want Pirlo!"

On Sunday night, this chant thundered through Yankee Stadium, where Major League Soccer's prized acquisition from a top European club, legendary Italian midfielder Andrea Pirlo, was set to make his debut with the New York City FC. The 36-year-old former Juventus star took the field as a sub in the second half, but from the cheers of the more than 30,000 fans, it was as if Babe Ruth had just scored the winning touchdown for the Knicks.

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3:36pm

Mon July 27, 2015
The Two-Way

Australia's Jehovah's Witnesses Failed To Report 1,006 Alleged Child Sex Abuses

Australia's Jehovah's Witnesses Church failed to report more than 1,000 cases of alleged sexual abuses against children, a national inquiry has found.

The BBC reports:

"Angus Stewart, counsel for the commission, said that of 1,006 alleged perpetrators of child sexual abuse identified by the Jehovah's Witnesses Church, 'not one was reported by the church to secular authorities.'

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2:05pm

Mon July 27, 2015
Movie Interviews

'Call Me Lucky': A Documentary Of Friendship, Childhood Abuse And Survival

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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2:05pm

Mon July 27, 2015
Music Reviews

New Release Features Jazz Flutist Sam Most's 'Breathy, Punchy Sound'

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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TERRY GROSS, HOST:

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1:25pm

Mon July 27, 2015
Goats and Soda

Tweets Welcoming #ObamaInEthiopia

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 2:06 pm

President Obama receives flowers upon his arrival Sunday aboard Air Force One at Bole International Airport in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

President Obama made history this week as the first sitting U.S. president to visit Ethiopia. He was welcomed with flowers, flags and plenty of tweets.

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12:41pm

Mon July 27, 2015
It's All Politics

'Offensive,' 'Sad': Reaction To Huckabee's Holocaust 'Oven' Reference

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 1:43 pm

Former Arkansas Gov. Mike Huckabee at the Family Leadership Summit in Iowa earlier this month.
Getty Images

Presidential candidate Mike Huckabee said over the weekend that President Obama's Iran deal is so bad it will "take the Israelis and march them to the door of the oven."

Candidates, politicians and groups were quick to denounce — or defend — the Holocaust reference.

Here's Huckabee's full quote, said in an interview with Breitbart News' editor-in-chief, Alexander Marlow, on Saturday:

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12:05pm

Mon July 27, 2015
Shots - Health News

Experiment In Coordinated Care For Medicare Failed To Show Savings

Coordinating care for high-risk patients was expected to save money and improve quality of care. A Medicare experiment didn't pan out.
Roy Scott Getty Images/Ikon Images

A $57 million experiment to provide better, more efficient care at federally funded health centers struggled to meet its goals and is unlikely to save money, says a government report on the project.

The test to coordinate treatment for high-risk Medicare patients in hundreds of communities was one of many demonstrations run by the Department of Health and Human Services' innovation center.

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11:39am

Mon July 27, 2015
Goats and Soda

New 'Daily Show' Host Trevor Noah Tries Out Jokes About Racism, Ebola

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 2:41 pm

The Trevor Noah countdown has begun. The South African stand-up comedian will begin hosting Comedy Central's Daily Show on Sept. 28. And what better way to get ready than ... by doing comedy.

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11:03am

Mon July 27, 2015
NPR Ed

The Toughest Job In Education? Maybe Not

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 6:50 pm

Rosie The Assistant Principal?
LA Johnson/NPR

It's been a theory of mine that the assistant principal has the toughest job in education.

I got that idea a long time ago, when I was a student teacher at a middle school.

It seemed the assistant principal's job goes something like this:

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10:39am

Mon July 27, 2015
The Two-Way

A Week Later, Milwaukee Police Still On The Hunt For 'Lion-Like' Animal

Originally published on Tue July 28, 2015 10:36 am

A screen shot of a video that shows a lion-like animal walking across a lawn in Milwaukee.
CBS 58

For a week, police had been receiving reports of a "lion-like" animal roaming the streets of Milwaukee.

Early last week, a resident even caught video of the creature. The cellphone footage showed what looked like a big, wild cat walking across a lawn:

The sightings increased as the week went by, and the police department closed streets and deployed teams of police officers and conservation officials. NBC News reports:

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8:13am

Mon July 27, 2015
The Two-Way

In Ethiopia, Obama Calls For An End To Oppressive Tactics

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 2:24 pm

President Obama and his delegation stand Monday during a welcome ceremony with Ethiopia's Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn at the National Palace in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia.
Tiksa Negeri Reuters /Landov

Kicking off a two-day trip to Ethiopia, President Obama called on the country to end its crackdown on journalists and to be more open politically.

Obama spoke Monday at a joint news conference with Ethiopian Prime Minister Hailemariam Desalegn.

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7:43am

Mon July 27, 2015
Around the Nation

Free Speech Lawsuit Centers On Health Warnings On Soda

Originally published on Mon July 27, 2015 8:11 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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STEVE INSKEEP, HOST:

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