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5:02am

Wed February 25, 2015
NPR Story

Turkish Web Entrepreneurs Boost Luxembourg's Tech Profile

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 8:05 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

LINDA WERTHEIMER, HOST:

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3:58am

Wed February 25, 2015
National Security

'Torture Report' Reshapes Conversation In Guantanamo Courtroom

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 6:07 pm

Defense attorneys for terrorism suspects at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, are now allowed to introduce details regarding their clients' interrogations after the so-called "torture report" was released by the Senate Intelligence Committee late last year.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

For years in the military courtroom at Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, there's been a subject no one could talk about: torture.

Now that's changed.

This latest chapter began when the military commission at Guantanamo held a hearing earlier this month in the case of five men accused of plotting the Sept. 11 attacks — a case that's been stuck for nearly three years in pre-trial wrangling.

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3:53am

Wed February 25, 2015
Religion

D.C. Bible Museum Will Be Immersive Experience, Organizers Say

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 6:52 pm

Steve Green in the basement of the Washington Design Center, which was recently demolished as part of the construction for the Museum of the Bible. Green and his family, owners of Hobby Lobby, are building the Museum of the Bible.
Andre Chung for The Washington Post/Getty Images

In Washington, D.C., construction is underway on the Museum of the Bible, an eight-story, $400 million enterprise funded by Hobby Lobby President Steve Green.

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3:50am

Wed February 25, 2015
All Tech Considered

Recruiting Better Talent With Brain Games And Big Data

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 9:23 am

With the technology to conduct more nuanced tests, some companies say they can provide more useful detail about how people think in dynamic situations.
Marcus Butt Getty Images/Ikon Images

The job interview hasn't changed much over the years. There are the resumes, the face-to-face meetings, the callbacks — and the agonizing wait, as employers decide based on a hunch about who's best suited for the job.

Some companies are selling the idea that new behavioral science techniques can give employers more insight into hiring.

For most of her life, Frida Polli assumed she'd be an academic. She got her Ph.D, toiled in a research lab and started a post-doctorate program before she realized she'd been wrong.

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8:20pm

Tue February 24, 2015
History

Even Pickaxes Couldn't Stop The Nation's First Oil Pipeline

Tanks holding oil in Pithole, Pa., in 1868. Samuel Van Syckel built his first pipeline over just five weeks in 1865. At 2 inches in diameter, it was tiny by modern standards — but it was an engineering marvel.
Drake Well Museum/Courtesy of PHMC

One-hundred-fifty years ago, a man named Samuel Van Syckel built the nation's first commercial oil pipeline in the rugged terrain of northwestern Pennsylvania.

His pipeline transformed how oil is transported — and it would change the modern world, too — but not before a battle that makes the debate over the Keystone XL pipeline look meek by comparison.

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4:59pm

Tue February 24, 2015
Digital Life

A Stolen iPhone, A New Connection And Minor Celebrity In China

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 7:16 pm

Months after Buzzfeed writer Matt Stopera's phone was stolen, new pictures from China started uploading to his photo stream. He wrote about it and Chinese twitter, Weibo, picked it up. Kelly McEvers talks to Stopera about his stolen iPhone and newfound fame in China.

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4:59pm

Tue February 24, 2015
Shots - Health News

Gerbils Likely Pushed Plague To Europe in Middle Ages

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:43 am

Gerbils are a beloved classroom pet, but they might also be deadly killers. A study now claims that gerbils helped bring bubonic plague to Medieval Europe and contributed to the deaths of millions.

Plague is caused by bacteria (Yersinia pestis) found in rodents, and the fleas that live on rodents. The rodent that's usually Suspect Zero is the rat.

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4:49pm

Tue February 24, 2015
Law

Sniper Trial Could Be In Jury's Hands Soon

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 7:16 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:49pm

Tue February 24, 2015
Politics

Christie Delivers N.J. Budget Address Amid Fiscal Challenges

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 7:16 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

4:49pm

Tue February 24, 2015
The Two-Way

U.S. Diplomat Says Change In Immigration Policy For Cubans Is Not On The Table

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 7:16 pm

Assistant Secretary of State, Bureau of Western Hemisphere Affairs, Roberta Jacobson, testifies on Capitol Hill in Washington, in February.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

The United States' long-time policy of automatically granting residence to Cubans who step foot on U.S. soil will not change "any time soon."

That's according to Assistant Secretary of State Roberta Jacobson, who will lead negotiations on reestablishing diplomatic ties with Cuba this Friday.

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4:49pm

Tue February 24, 2015
NPR Ed

College? Career Tech? In Nashville, Teens Do Both

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 7:16 pm

John Scarborough, a fourth-year pharmacy student at Lipscomb University, talks to high schoolers during a vocational career training class.
Courtesy of Lipscomb University

Schools don't like to use the V-word anymore — "vocational," as in "vocational education." Administrators say the word is outdated, along with the idea of offering job-training courses only to students who are going straight into the workforce.

Nashville, Tenn., is trying a new approach. The public school system there is encouraging every high school student, regardless of college plans, to take three career-training classes before they graduate.

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4:49pm

Tue February 24, 2015
Parallels

Jordan's King Balances Threats Abroad And Critics At Home

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 8:27 am

Jordanians marched in the streets of the capital Amman on Feb. 6 to show solidarity with the family of a pilot killed by the Islamic State in Syria. Jordanians also expressed support for the king's decision to take part in the U.S.-led coalition against ISIS.
Muhammad Hamed Reuters/Landov

Jordan's King Abdullah has faced a delicate balancing act ever since he ascended the throne in 1999 following his father's death. His country shares borders with Iraq, Syria and Israel among others, and there always seems to be trouble in the neighborhood.

His latest challenge has been to convince Jordanians that it's in the country's interest to play a prominent role in the U.S.-led coalition against the self-declared Islamic State.

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4:49pm

Tue February 24, 2015
Law

Little-Known Laws Help Sex Trafficking Victims Clear Criminal Records

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 9:05 am

This woman, who has had her prostitution charge wiped away, says she got the lotus tattoo to cover up the brand of a former pimp. "Once they put their name on me, I was their property," she adds. She says she got the word "persist" tattooed as a reminder to keep moving forward.
Evie Stone NPR

Advocates for women arrested on prostitution charges want the justice system to adopt a different approach. They say instead of being locked up, many prostitutes should actually be considered victims of human trafficking. And they're starting to offer those women a way to clean up the criminal records left behind.

One of them lives in an apartment not far from Dallas. Inside, a 24-year-old woman pushes up her sleeve to show off a tattoo of a lotus flower. The deep purple ink covers up an older mark.

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4:47pm

Tue February 24, 2015
Code Switch

Here's Where Emoji Skin-Tone Colors Come From

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 8:14 pm

Here are the latest set of emoji.
AP

In emoji news (one of my favorite types of weird news, ever): Apple this week released a beta operating system to its testers that finally includes noticeably browner — and, um, yellower — choices.

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4:26pm

Tue February 24, 2015
Shots - Health News

Younger Women Hesitate To Say They're Having A Heart Attack

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 2:21 pm

Each year more than 15,000 women under the age of 55 die of heart disease in the United States. And younger women are twice as likely to die after being hospitalized for a heart attack as men in the same age group.

It doesn't help that women tend to delay seeking emergency care for symptoms of a heart attack such as pain and dizziness, says Judith Lichtman, an associate professor of epidemiology at the Yale School of Public Health. "We've known that for a while," she says.

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4:01pm

Tue February 24, 2015
Goats and Soda

How Did A Celibate 82-Year-Old Buddhist Monk Contract HIV?

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 7:32 pm

A so-called "smart" syringe can only be used once, so there's no chance a patient can be infected due to multiple usages.
Courtesy of Chris Black/WHO

An 82-year-old celibate Buddhist abbot from Cambodia has been diagnosed with HIV. His doctor was the cause: He was reusing syringes and infected a reported 272 individuals, including babies and children.

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3:37pm

Tue February 24, 2015
Shots - Health News

Will Vaping Reignite The Battle Over Smoking On Airplanes?

Originally published on Thu February 26, 2015 9:50 am

Those were the days: A stewardess lights a cigar for a passenger aboard an American Airlines flight in 1949.
Bettmann/CORBIS

My biggest concern while flying is whether my legs will fall victim to deep vein thrombosis from being crammed in the sardine can we call an airplane seat. But on the bright side, at least I'm not increasing my risk of lung cancer, emphysema and bronchitis because of secondhand smoke.

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2:41pm

Tue February 24, 2015
Television

Fair Warning: Watch One 'Foyle's War' Episode, And You'll Want To Watch Them All

Michael Kitchen stars as Foyle, a widowed police superintendent in the coastal city of Hastings in England. His sidekick is his driver, Samantha Stewart, a vicar's daughter played by Honeysuckle Weeks.
Acorn TV/ITV

The satisfying thing about TV crime shows is that they offer a sense of closure. The unsatisfying thing is how much of life they must leave out to do it. Like, history. Whether you're talking CSI or Sherlock, crime shows tend to take place in a weirdly hermetic universe where the characters may change — like in True Detective — yet the historical moment in which they live remains largely irrelevant background.

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2:36pm

Tue February 24, 2015
Author Interviews

After His Brother's Suicide, Writer Seeks Comfort In 'All The Wrong Places'

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 8:35 pm

Philip Connors' first book Fire Season was about how he spent a few months every year for eight years as a fire lookout, living in a cabin and scanning the horizon with binoculars atop a 45-foot tower in a remote region of New Mexico.
Mark Ehling Courtesy of W.W. Norton & Co.

When writer Philip Connors was in his 20s, he received a call from his mother that later haunted him: "You know, I spoke to your brother and he's been having trouble with his girlfriend — he sounded really down ... you should really call him."

"And when I hung up the phone, I thought to myself: 'Yeah, yeah, kid brother and his silly troubles with women, I'll get around to calling him. I'll call him in a few days, or maybe next week,' " Connors tells Fresh Air's Dave Davies.

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2:35pm

Tue February 24, 2015
The Two-Way

Feds Close Investigation Of George Zimmerman Without Pressing Charges

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 3:51 pm

George Zimmerman answers questions from a Seminole circuit judge in Sanford, Fla., last November.
Joe Burbank AP

Federal authorities have decided to close an investigation of George Zimmerman, the Florida man who shot and killed 17-year-old Trayvon Martin back in 2012.

The killing sparked protests and a national conversation on race. Zimmerman, who is white, was acquitted of murder of the unarmed black teenager by a Florida jury, but federal prosecutors were weighing whether to bring hate crime charges against Zimmerman.

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2:33pm

Tue February 24, 2015
The Salt

Tea Tuesdays: The Chemis-Tea Of Pouring The Perfect English-Style Cuppa

Meredith Rizzo NPR

Tea is a daily ritual for millions of Britons. And the British are very specific about how they take their cuppa: black, traditionally with milk and sugar. In 1946, George Orwell wrote an essay in which he claimed to have cracked the code to putting together the perfect cup of tea with milk. But taste preferences can be very individual, so his solution may not be your ideal brew.

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2:27pm

Tue February 24, 2015
All Tech Considered

Trouble Ahead? Searching For Google's Future

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 6:07 pm

Google co-founder and CEO Larry Page says the company will place more focus on its key projects.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

It is hard to imagine a world without the ubiquity of Google, and the tech giant is working hard to keep it that way. Google has perfected the art of search advertising on desktop and laptop, and it controls the widely used Android mobile OS, as well as YouTube and Nest. But is the company nimble enough to capitalize on the next best thing in tech?

Some tech industry observers aren't sure.

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2:21pm

Tue February 24, 2015
The Two-Way

Obama Vetoes Keystone XL Pipeline Bill

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 4:40 pm

Updated at 4:04 p.m. ET

The White House has notified the Senate that President Obama has, as promised, vetoed congressional legislation to approve the Keystone XL pipeline project.

"Through this bill, the United States Congress attempts to circumvent longstanding and proven processes for determining whether or not building and operating a cross-border pipeline serves the national interest," Obama said in the notification to the Senate.

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2:15pm

Tue February 24, 2015
The Two-Way

3 Missing Teenage Girls Now In Syria, British Police Say

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 5:13 pm

British police say three teenage girls believed to have run away to join Islamist extremists have now crossed into Syria. The girls, ages 15 and 16, left their London homes Feb. 17 and boarded flights for Istanbul. Police think they then crossed the border into Syria hoping to join up with militants from the so-called Islamic State.

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1:34pm

Tue February 24, 2015
The Two-Way

Finnish Public Broadcasting To Read Entire Quran In New Series

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 7:37 pm

Mohammad Sajjad AP

Finnish public broadcasting is reading the Quran — all of it, a half-hour at a time.

Radio 1, the radio arm of broadcaster Yle, will begin reading Islam's holy book on March 7 in 60 installments of a half-hour each.

The readings will begin with a discussion between Anas Hajjar, an imam from the Islamic Society of Finland, and professor Jaakko Hameen-Anttila, who translated the Quran into Finnish.

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12:33pm

Tue February 24, 2015
NPR Ed

The Great U.S. History Battle

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 3:04 pm

American boys re-enact George Washington's crossing of the Delaware River in 1776.
Jack Fletcher National Geographic

William Faulkner wrote, "The past is never dead. It's not even past." And that's never more true than when people start arguing over how American history should be taught in school.

The current fight involves the Advanced Placement U.S. history exam. Nearly half a million high school students took the test last year, hoping to earn college credit.

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11:47am

Tue February 24, 2015
The Two-Way

Eurozone Approves Greek Overhaul Plan

Jeroen Dijsselbloem, the head of the Eurogroup (right) sits next to Roberto Gualtieri, the chairman of the Committee on Economic and Monetary Affairs, during a meeting Tuesday at the European Parliament in Brussels. The European Union's executive branch said the list of Greek reform measures for final approval of the extended rescue loans is sufficiently comprehensive to be a valid starting point.
Geert Vanden Wijngaert AP

European finance ministers have approved Greece's proposed economic reforms and agreed to extend financial assistance to the country by four months.

In a statement, the Eurogroup said it would begin "national procedures" – including parliamentary votes in some member states – to give the deal a final approval.

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11:35am

Tue February 24, 2015
Goats and Soda

Emotional Scars Of Modern Slavery Run 'Deeper Than Any Visible Wound'

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 6:00 pm

Burmese migrant Thazin Mon Htay and her father Ko Ngwe Htay were trafficked to Thailand to peel shrimp. They worked 16-hour shifts, seven days a week, for less than $10 a day, Ko Ngwe told PBS NewsHour.
Jason Motlagh/Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting for NPR

Some recall getting burned. Others say they've been strangled or attacked by dogs. Many suffer from depression and anxiety. These are only a small sampling of what tens of millions modern slaves endure daily, researchers in London reported Wednesday.

The study, published in The Lancet Global Health, is the largest one, so far, to detail the mental and physical health of people who have survived human trafficking.

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11:20am

Tue February 24, 2015
Goats and Soda

House Of Carbs: A Big Ball O' Carbohydrates Is Good Eating In Ghana

Originally published on Wed February 25, 2015 4:36 pm

A carb ball shares the bowl with a chunk of meat.
Terrie Schweitzer Flickr

As Homer Simpson might say: Mmmmm, carb balls.

I remember the first time I encountered this specialty of rural Ghana, where I'm spending two years as a Peace Corps volunteer.

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11:17am

Tue February 24, 2015
The Two-Way

Commuter Train Derails After Hitting Vehicle In Southern California

Originally published on Tue February 24, 2015 8:43 pm

An overturned Metrolink passenger car sits on the side of the road after the commuter train crashed into a truck and derailed early Tuesday near Oxnard, Calif.
Johnny Corona AP

Dozens of people were reportedly injured in a commuter train crash near Oxnard, Calif., during Tuesday morning's rush hour. Emergency crews swarmed the area, where several Metrolink train cars were thrown onto their sides by the powerful collision.

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