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2:30am

Tue June 7, 2011
China: Beyond Borders

As China Invests, Many Kazakhs Say: Not Too Fast

A worker welds at the China-Kazakhstan pipeline junction in Xinjiang, China, in 2008.
Carlos Spottorno Getty Images

As China grows in power and influence, few countries are feeling the effects more than neighboring Kazakhstan.

Having broken from its past as a Soviet republic, Kazakhstan now has an up-and-coming economy and a desire to be a player on the world stage. China seems to be offering just what Kazakhstan needs β€” billions of dollars in foreign investment and deeper political ties with real-world powers.

But many people in Kazakhstan have a plea: not too fast.

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12:01am

Tue June 7, 2011
Health Care

New Jersey Seeks To Shrink Medicaid

Cash-strapped states are rethinking how much health care coverage they can afford to provide for their neediest residents. New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie wants to cut $500 million in Medicaid spending β€” in part by freezing more than 20,000 state residents out of the program. Critics say the cuts would hurt those who can least afford it.

For years, New Jersey expanded health care coverage for low-income residents β€” people like Deborah Shupenko of Passaic. But last month, after 10 years of state-funded health insurance, Shupenko got a letter in the mail.

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12:01am

Tue June 7, 2011
Arts & Life

How Uncle Sam Helps Define America's Diet

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:46 am

With canned goods in short supply during World Wars I and II, people ate more fresh fruit and vegetables β€” many from their own back yards.
National Archives, Publications of the U.S. Government

First Lady Michelle Obama received a lot of attention for her vegetable garden on the South Lawn of the White House. The garden, which provides vegetables both for the first family and for state dinners, was also meant to provide Americans with an example of how to eat more healthfully.

As it turns out, Washington has a long tradition of trying to guide the American diet, going back over 200 years. Founding fathers like Thomas Jefferson and Benjamin Franklin brought plants like rice and olives from their missions abroad to see how they would fare in their own country.

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12:01am

Tue June 7, 2011
Business

Female Prison Inmates Trained To Start Businesses

Former convicts can have a difficult time finding a job, especially when the economy is weak.

But at the Coffee Creek Correctional Facility, a women's prison in Oregon, inmates can learn how to reverse that trend. A course called Lifelong Information For Entrepreneurs, or LIFE, is designed to provide inmates the skills to start their own small businesses after they are released.

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12:01am

Tue June 7, 2011
National Security

U.S. Military Has New Threat: Health Care Costs

Defense Secretary Robert Gates has sought to raise rates on military health insurance paid by working-age retirees. This week, he spoke to troops at Forward Operating Base Walton in Kandahar, Afghanistan.
U.S. Navy Getty Images

Defense Secretary Robert Gates says that pension and health care costs are eating the U.S. military alive. And the Pentagon predicts that the cost of taking care of its troops and retirees will keep growing.

Retired Maj. Gen. Arnold Punaro gets a lot of hate mail, because he's talking about something a whole lot of people don't want to hear about: the rising costs of military health and pension benefits.

"We in the Department of Defense are on the same path that General Motors found itself on," he says.

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12:01am

Tue June 7, 2011
Politics

Ten Years of Bush Tax Cuts

Later this week, Vice President Biden will host another meeting with Republican and Democratic lawmakers, looking for ways to reduce the federal budget deficit.

The red ink they'll be discussing reflects both government spending and deliberate moves to reduce taxes, including a major round of cuts signed into law by President George W. Bush ten years ago Tuesday.

The signing ceremony was originally going to be outdoors, on the South Lawn of the White House, but rain forced a hasty relocation to the East Room.

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12:01am

Tue June 7, 2011
Asia

Pakistani General: 'Indiscriminate' Against Terrorists

A Pakistani general being urged to clear out a strategic area along his country's border with Afghanistan says his troops are engaged in active operations in the region, and Pakistan alone shouldn't be blamed for cross-border militancy.

Lt. Gen. Asif Yasin Malik, who commands Pakistan's Eleventh Corps, tells NPR's Steve Inskeep that perceptions his troops can't enter North Waziristan are incorrect.

"We're already there," he says. "I have five brigades over there β€” about 20,000-25,000 troops."

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8:12pm

Mon June 6, 2011
It's All Politics

Anthony Weiner's Survival Will Take More Than An Apology

If Rep. Anthony Weiner, the New York congressman who on Monday admitted that he lied when he denied sending lewd photos to and "sexting" with six women over the last three years says he's not resigning.

Maybe he can survive. But events are largely out of his hands now as they have been ever since the scandal broke over the Memorial Day weekend.

Here are some reasons why he could get past this and some reasons why he might not.

Let's start with the reasons he could hang on.

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6:45pm

Mon June 6, 2011
Law

Supreme Court Rules On College and Business Cases

The U.S. Supreme Court is now heading down the stretch toward the end of its current term, with major decisions still outstanding, and 27 cases overall yet to be decided. On Monday, the justices issued a variety of opinions of particular interest to the business community, and left intact a California policy that gives illegal aliens in-state college tuition benefits.

Patent ownership

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6:20pm

Mon June 6, 2011
The Two-Way

B.C.S. Officially Strips Southern California Of Its 2004 Championship

The Bowl Championship Series announced today that it has stripped the University of Southern California of the 2004 national championship title. The move comes after the NCAA found that Reggie Bush received benefits not in keeping with NCAA rules.

USA Today reports:

This marks the first time a football or men's basketball championship has been vacated in major college sports since the polls began.

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6:12pm

Mon June 6, 2011
Planet Money

Portugal Turns Right

Portugal's new prime minister, Pedro Passos Coelho.
Miguel Riopa AFP/Getty Images

Hello everyone! Today I joined the Planet Money team as the new intern. I arrived here in New York on the eve of a big election in my home country, Portugal, where I lived for 16 years.

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5:30pm

Mon June 6, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

People In Mass. Like Their Health Law, But Reservations On Mandate Persist

iStockphoto.com

A new poll finds that an overwhelming majority of Massachusetts residents support the continuation of that state's landmark universal health insurance law passed in 2006, even though support for its central feature, a requirement for most residents to have health insurance, remains more evenly divided.

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5:06pm

Mon June 6, 2011
The Two-Way

Lesson Learned: When Use Of Social Media Is Clumsy

Two stories are putting a spotlight on clumsy uses of social media: First, of course, Rep. Anthony Weiner's dalliance with Twitter. As Mark reported, during a press conference today, Weiner admitted that he had tweeted a lewd picture of himself thinking he had direct messaged it to a woman. The picture was instead tweeted publicly and the media jumped on it, culminating in a tearful confession.

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5:01pm

Mon June 6, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

A Baby's Skin Is No Match For The Sun

A baby's skin has got to be the most velvety soft substance on earth. That delicate skin makes babies and toddlers more vulnerable to sun damage, and to the chemicals in sunscreens intended to protect them.

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4:30pm

Mon June 6, 2011
The Two-Way

Rep. Weiner Admits Lying, Sending Lewd Photo, Inappropriate Conversations

Saying that "I have made terrible mistakes and have hurt the people I care about the most," a tearful Rep. Anthony Weiner (D-NY) just admitted lying about a lewd photo he sent to a young woman and to having "inappropriate conversations" over social media and on the phone with "six women over the last three years."

He also said he is not going to resign from office.

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4:18pm

Mon June 6, 2011
Youth Radio

Unschooled: How One Kid Is Grateful He Stayed Home

Sam Fuller of Albany is part of a rare minority of homeschoolers who call themselves "unschooled" β€” a more unstructured self-directed form of homeschooling.
Courtesy of Sam Fuller

With summer on the horizon, many teens are looking forward to a break from school and tests. But for Sam Fuller of Albany, not much is going to change. Fuller is part of a rare minority of homeschoolers who call themselves "unschooled" β€” a more unstructured self-directed form of homeschooling. There are about 2 million registered homeschoolers in the U.S., a number that grows by about 10 percent a year. Sam's family can keep Sam and his brother home by registering their house as a private school.

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4:12pm

Mon June 6, 2011
Energy

Is The Future Of Nuclear Power In Mini Reactors?

Instead of building costly, huge nuclear power plants like the Exelon Byron station in Byron, Ill., engineers are scaling down β€” aiming for garage-sized reactors that produce just one-tenth the amount of electricity of a conventional facility.
Jeff Haynes AFP/Getty Images

Almost 60 years ago, engineers in Idaho switched on the world's first nuclear power plant. It was only able to illuminate four light bulbs. The reactor vessel in Idaho stood about eight feet high, and eventually it made enough electricity to power a building.

A nuclear plant today can produce 10,000 times as much electricity. But for the last 20 years, new nuclear plants have been too expensive to build. Now engineers are trying to revive the industry by thinking small again.

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3:56pm

Mon June 6, 2011
All Songs Considered Blog

Survey: Your Music And The Cloud

Apple's iCloud
Apple.com

If you've followed tech news in recent months, chances are you've heard about the "cloud," a virtual storage space in the sky for your digital documents and, more recently, your music library. Now, with cloud based computing, you can access your data anywhere with an Internet connection, on your phone, tablet or computer. Amazon and Google have already announced their versions of a music "cloud" service and today Apple entered the field with its own version.

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3:47pm

Mon June 6, 2011
The Record

Apple Announces iCloud Streaming Music Service

Apple CEO Steve Jobs delivers the keynote address at the 2011 Apple World Wide Developers Conference in San Francisco.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

You can hear Laura Sydell, NPR's Digital Culture Reporter, talk to All Things Considered's Melissa Block about the announcement by clicking on the audio link above.

On Monday afternoon, Apple announced the introduction of iCloud, a music service that will allow users to listen to their music from almost any Internet-connected device. (Update: Initially we called Apple's service a streaming one. We're not sure exactly how iTunes Match will work, and we're getting in touch with Apple. We'll update again as soon as we hear back.)

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3:43pm

Mon June 6, 2011
Around the Nation

Slow-Motion Landslide Threatens Homes In New York

Pam Machold's home on Little Porter Mountain has been so badly twisted by the Keene Valley landslide that local officials condemned the structure.
Brian Mann NCPR

Towns and cities across the U.S. have been dealing this spring with fast-moving natural disasters, from tornadoes to flash floods.

In northern New York and Vermont, the disaster has developed slowly. Weeks of torrential rains have glutted Lake Champlain, flooding hundreds of miles of coastline.

Now in the mountain village of Keene Valley, N.Y., all that water has triggered a massive landslide that is slowly destroying a neighborhood.

'Largest Landslide In State's History'

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3:37pm

Mon June 6, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

As Cancer Treatments Advance, So Do Costs

A breast cancer patient receives an experimental cancer treatment at the University of California, San Francisco, in 2005.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

At a big cancer meeting in Chicago right now there's a lot of talk about progress in cancer treatment, including experimental new drugs for skin cancer and lung cancer.

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3:30pm

Mon June 6, 2011
The Two-Way

NBC's Olympic TV Dynasty Challenged In Rights Bidding

The International Olympic Committee is listening to pitches and accepting bids Monday and Tuesday for exclusive rights to broadcast the Olympics in the United States.

American broadcast rights are the single biggest revenue generator for the IOC and the bidding underway in Lausanne, Switzerland, has ABC/ESPN and Fox challenging NBC for its lock on the 10 most recent summer and winter games.

The IOC is hoping for a deal totaling more than $4 billion for four Olympics, beginning with the Sochi, Russia, Winter Games in 2014. That would be the biggest TV rights deal ever.

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3:30pm

Mon June 6, 2011
It's All Politics

Easier To Win Nobel Prize Than Senate Confirmation To Federal Reserve

It's apparently easier to win a Nobel Prize in economics than it is to navigate the perilous partisan waters of Washington politics.

That's one lesson to draw from the case of Peter Diamond, the Nobel laureate and Massachusetts Institute of Technology professor who President Obama nominated to be a Federal Reserve Board governor but who won't be coming to Washington, after all.

Republicans on the Senate Banking Committee soured on Diamond after several had initially seemed supportive.

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3:24pm

Mon June 6, 2011
The Two-Way

In Afghanistan, Marines Say Now's Not The Time For U.S. Pullout

Later this month, President Barack Obama is expected to announce just how many troops will be pulled out of Afghanistan starting in July. Whether the U.S. should still be engaged in Afghanistan has been hotly contested for years, but the budget crunch and the killing of Osama bin Laden has only intensified the debate.

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3:10pm

Mon June 6, 2011
Law

Conn. Poised To Be First State To Mandate Sick Pay

As many Americans watch their job benefits shrink amid tight budgets, Connecticut is about to defy the trend: It's set to become the first state to mandate paid sick days for some low-wage workers.

Across the country, 40 million people have no paid sick time, and advocates now see momentum for a national movement.

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2:49pm

Mon June 6, 2011
Monkey See

Katie Couric Gets A Daytime Talk Show

Network evening news may not have worked out, but Katie Couric is wasting no time making other plans.

Her replacement on the CBS Evening News, Scott Pelley, starts tonight, but today, she announced that she's starting a syndicated daytime talk show to be produced by ABC, beginning in the fall of 2012.

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2:40pm

Mon June 6, 2011
Planet Money

The Failure Tour Of New York

Originally published on Mon May 7, 2012 12:36 pm

Mary Altaffer AP

"I'm sure New York does failure better than anyone else because it does success better than anywhere else," Tim Harford says.

Harford, an economist and author, isn't just being kind. He argues in his new book, "Adapt," that success always starts with failure.

And so we've set out across Manhattan to look for some of those big ideas that didn't work out.

Out first stop is the main library. In the lobby is a classic example of how even things we consider successful were flops at the time: a 15th-century Bible printed by Johannes Gutenberg himself.

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2:09pm

Mon June 6, 2011
The Two-Way

One Pleads Guilty In Utah Immigration 'Hit List' Case

There's one guilty plea so far in the immigration "hit list" case in Utah that energized anti-immigration activists and appalled privacy and civil rights groups.

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2:08pm

Mon June 6, 2011
Monkey See

Seeing Teenagers As We Wish They Were: The Debate Over YA Fiction

iStockphoto.com

Over the weekend, The Wall Street Journal ran a piece claiming that fiction at least nominally aimed at readers under 18 β€” young adult or "YA" fiction, that is β€” is entirely too dark.

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1:54pm

Mon June 6, 2011
A Blog Supreme

'Treme,' Ep. 17: Mardi Gras Mayhem

Al "Carnival Time" Johnson (center, singing) sits in with Antoine Batiste and the Soul Apostles on Treme. Batiste, the trombonist, is played by Wendell Pierce.
Paul Schiraldi HBO

Two years running, Treme has featured a sensory-overload pageant of a Mardi Gras episode. Let's get right to this one. New Orleans native son Josh Jackson is here again to help break down the music.


Patrick Jarenwattananon: A lot of the first few scenes are scored to the sounds of marching bands. First, what's all this business with the Muses parade and their glitter shoes?

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