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10:30am

Thu August 11, 2011
Opinion

Weekly Standard: Will Liberals Blast Reid's Picks?

Senate Majority Leader Sen. Harry Reid speaks about debt ceiling legislation on Capitol Hill in Washington, on Monday, Aug. 1, 2011. On Tuesday, Reid announced his super-committee picks.
Jacquelyn Martin AP

Daniel Halper is the deputy online editor for The Weekly Standard.

Senate majority leader Harry Reid picked his three representatives to the twelve congressional member supercommittee Tuesday, selecting Max Baucus, John Kerry, and Patty Murray. The first two choices make sense: Baucus is chairman of the Senate Finance Committee, and Kerry was the Democratic nominee for president in 2004 and, as his website describes, "holds senior positions on the Finance, Commerce, and Small Business Committees."

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9:51am

Thu August 11, 2011
The Two-Way

Markets Off To Another Volatile Start

At opening the markets opened low, then regained their steam on the good news we reported earlier about lower unemployment claims. Then, the stocks headed lower. All of that to say, it looks like it's going to be another dramatic day on Wall Street.

The European markets still dealing with fears about France's credit ratings could give us some indication of the type of up-and-down day we may be in for. Here's Dow Jones Newswires with what happened there:

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9:34am

Thu August 11, 2011
The Two-Way

Authorities Will Not Charge Gizmodo Over iPhone Prototype Purchase

If you remember the iPhone 4 frenzy back in 2010, then you remember Jason Chen, a writer for Gizmodo. He was the one who bought a prototype of the iPhone 4 that an Apple engineer left at a bar and then Chen published a story about it that revealed the new phone's new specs.

Probably because Apple is known to be so secretive, the story blew up. And a few days later Chen's home was raided by a law enforcement task force called the Rapid Enforcement Allied Computer Team.

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9:13am

Thu August 11, 2011
Opinion

New Republic: Four Steps To Avoid Global Depression

President Barack Obama, left, shakes hands Commerce Sec. Gary Locke, right, after announcing that Locke will be the next US ambassador to China, in the Diplomatic Room of the White House Wednesday, March, 9, 2011. Locke is replacing Jon Huntsman.
Pablo Martinez Monsivais AP

William Galston is a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution and a contributing editor for The New Republic.

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9:12am

Thu August 11, 2011
Opinion

Weekly Standard: Shaken (Not Stirred) Money Maker

A bartender mixes cocktails at a stand selling vodka at the Wine and Gourmet Asia show at the Venetian hotel in Macau on November 8, 2007.
Mike Clarke AFP/Getty Images

Victorino Matus is a senior editor at The Weekly Standard.

Unemployment once again has crept past 9 percent. GDP growth fell below 2 percent this last quarter. Inflation is up. Home values are down. There's talk of a double-dip recession. According to one market analyst, "We're on the verge of a great, great depression." But through it all, there is one constant, a commodity that has not only survived during these harsh economic times, but even thrived.

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8:57am

Thu August 11, 2011
Opinion

Foreign Policy: Britain's Young And Relentless

A jewelry store is damaged in Ealing, west London, Tuesday, Aug. 9, 2011, following unrest overnight. A wave of violence and looting raged across London and spread to three other major British cities Tuesday, as authorities struggled to contain the country's worst unrest since race riots set the capital ablaze in the 1980s.
Jonathan Short AP

Portia Walker is a freelance journalist.

Buildings are charred and shops barricaded closed. Helicopters circle low overhead. London's prison cells are all full. Police are flooding the streets of the capital. For four days now, mobs have run amok in multiple areas across this city, looting, brawling, and terrorizing people.

As a mob stormed through a warm Monday night on a west London street, restaurants locked their doors and diners headed home early.

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8:45am

Thu August 11, 2011
The Two-Way

New Unemployment Claims Drop To Four-Week Low

The Labor Department released a rare piece of good economic news, today: Its weekly unemployment claims report shows that this past week had saw lowest number of claims in a month.

For the week ending Aug. 6, the number of unemployment claims dropped by 7,000 to 395,000, the lowest number since the week that ended April 2.

Reuters reports:

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8:10am

Thu August 11, 2011
The Two-Way

In U.K.: Talk Of Banning Masks, Blocking Text Messages

This masked man walked past a burning car in London on Monday (Aug. 8, 2011).
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

The wave of violence that swept across cities in Britain over the past week has led to Prime Minister David Cameron saying that:

-- Authorities may block instant messaging services "when we know they are plotting violence, disorder and criminality."

-- The police have been given the power to order protesters to remove facemasks "under any circumstances where there is reasonable suspicion that they are related to criminal activity."

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7:24am

Thu August 11, 2011

6:58am

Thu August 11, 2011
Around the Nation

Chad Ochocinco Wants To Be A Fan's Houseguest

Football wide receiver Chad Ochocinco is new to the New England Patriots. The former Cincinnati player hasn't found a permanent home. So he told reporters he intends to spend the first few weeks of the season living with a football fan. The fan must have the Internet and Xbox.

6:49am

Thu August 11, 2011
Strange News

Balloon Dresses Are Time Sensitive

A Japanese balloon artist has twisted hundreds of balloons into transparent minidresses. An English artist wove 5,000 into a dress inspired by Kate Middleton's wedding gown. The latex creations can only be worn once — after 24 hours, the balloons start to deflate.

6:44am

Thu August 11, 2011
Business

Is There A Band Width Shortage?

Movie and video streaming are Internet gas guzzlers. They account for a huge growing amount of traffic on the Internet, and service providers are struggling to keep up with demand. CNET Senior Writer Maggie Reardon talks to Steve Inskeep about whether consumers are facing a bandwidth shortage.

6:35am

Thu August 11, 2011
Europe

Massive Police Presence Helps Quell British Riots

The streets of London and other British cities were mostly quiet Wednesday night amid a massive police presence that has helped stop the wave of violence and looting that's wracked Britain since the weekend. Courts there worked through the night to process some of those arrested. Parliament is meeting for an emergency session after Prime Minister David Cameron recalled members from their summer break.

6:31am

Thu August 11, 2011
Politics

Congress Fills Seats On Bipartisan Debt Committee

Congressional leaders have announced their appointments to the so-called "supercommittee." The panel's job is to find deeper deficit reductions and a long-term plan for the federal government's spending.

4:00am

Thu August 11, 2011
NPR Story

European Market Pressures Move To France

The European debt crisis is being blamed for a run on the shares of French banks. The stocks tumbled on the Paris stock exchange yesterday, amid fears the country's "Triple A" credit rating was under threat. Government officials and the banks said the fears were based on speculators spreading rumors.

4:00am

Thu August 11, 2011
NPR Story

'Hidden Billionaires' Profiles Under-The-Radar Rich

Bloomberg Markets Matthew Miller spent months scouring the globe for billionaires who control big parts of the economy, yet have managed to fly under the radar. He talks to Renee Montagne about his article "Hidden Billionaires."

4:00am

Thu August 11, 2011
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

Steve Inskeep has the Last Word in business.

4:00am

Thu August 11, 2011
Business

Business News

Renee Montagne has business news.

4:00am

Thu August 11, 2011
Economy

France Snared In Debt Crisis Crossfire

Investors have been witnessing big swings on Wall Street as well as Asian and European exchanges. And now France is the latest country caught up in the debt crisis plaguing Europe and the United States. Jonathan Loynes, the chief European economist at Capital Economics in London, talks to Steve Inskeep about the latest financial market movers.

4:00am

Thu August 11, 2011
Sports

NCAA Devises Rescue Plan For Tarnished Sports Programs

Ohio State, Auburn, USC — the NCAA has been faced with violations at a number of big-time college sports programs. NPR's Tom Goldman reports on efforts to remake the enforcement system.

12:05am

Thu August 11, 2011
Energy

Energy Panel Wants Answers On Gas Fracking

Originally published on Thu August 11, 2011 12:01 am

A Department of Energy panel hopes new recommendations — if implemented — will restore the public's trust in hydraulic fracturing or "fracking" for natural gas.

In the last few years, fracking has brought new life to old gas fields around the country. Most of the increasing production comes from dense layers of shale deep underground. By pumping huge deep underground amounts of water, along with smaller amounts of chemicals and sand, drillers can force gas out of shale.

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12:01am

Thu August 11, 2011
Business

In Shift To Streaming, Netflix Customers Find Holes

It seems like Netflix is on top and it's everywhere. Users can watch it on their computers, game consoles, smartphones, or Internet-connected TV. Netflix boasts some 25 million subscribers, which is more than big cable companies like Comcast and Time Warner.

Although the company started as a mail order DVD service, these days it does the lion's share of promoting for its online streaming service. The company says it's the place to "watch instantly."

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12:01am

Thu August 11, 2011
Economy

What's Spooking Investors?

Economists and financial executives gathered for a retreat in Grand Lake Stream, Maine, last weekend. The annual event coincided with mayhem in the stock market and the downgrade of U.S. Treasuries.
Chris Arnold NPR

While Wall Street experiences the biggest stock sell-off in years, some very successful investors don't appear to be concerned. They're out buying stocks while everybody else panics.

Top executives are also downplaying the perceived crisis.

"We don't run the business based on what happens in the market in a day," Jamie Dimon, CEO of JP Morgan Chase, said Wednesday on CNBC. Bank stocks like his have been getting hammered in recent days.

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12:01am

Thu August 11, 2011
Politics

President Gets Big Megaphone, But May Be Tuned Out

President Obama walks away from the podium Monday after speaking about the debt downgrade in the State Dining Room of the White House.
Chip Somodevilla Getty Images

On Monday morning, U.S. markets opened for the first time since Standard & Poor's downgraded America's credit rating. Stocks went over the edge like an Olympic diver.

A few hours later, President Obama stepped in front of a microphone at the White House to proclaim his confidence in the U.S.

"No matter what some agency may say, we've always been and always will be a AAA country," he said.

He left the podium, and the financial plunge continued.

So, does having the biggest megaphone in the country do the president any good?

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12:01am

Thu August 11, 2011
Around the Nation

Officials In Phila. Plan Curfews To Curb Teen Violence

Days of rioting in England are capturing international attention. In the United States, cities are also dealing with mob attacks, though on a smaller and less destructive scale. Earlier this week, Philadelphia officials announced their plan to fight mob violence, which has escalated in recent months.

Outside Philadelphia City Hall earlier this week, a small group of teens sat on the ground.

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12:01am

Thu August 11, 2011
Arts & Life

World Art Managers Find New Funding Models In D.C.

Kennedy Center fellow Reem Kassem recently used her Kennedy connections to help organize an outdoor arts festival in Alexandria, Egypt.
Kennedy Center

Cultural diplomacy usually comes in the form of a traveling art exhibit or a celebrity visit to a war-torn country. But there's a deeper kind of diplomacy taking place at the Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. For the past four summers, arts managers from around the world have been coming to D.C. for training on how to improve their organizations back home.

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12:01am

Thu August 11, 2011
Author Interviews

Discworld's Terry Pratchett On Death And Deciding

Terry Pratchett began writing the novels of his Discworld fantasy series in 1983. Snuff is the 39th book in the collection.
Peter Macdiarmid Getty Images

If you've read the Discworld novels by popular fantasy writer Terry Pratchett, you've surely encountered Death. He's an actual character — a skeleton in a black hood who's portrayed as not such a bad guy after all.

So maybe it's not so surprising that at 63, Pratchett — who has been diagnosed with early-onset Alzheimer's — speaks openly about causing his own death.

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12:01am

Thu August 11, 2011
The Record

Country's New Guard Gets Back To Basics

Originally published on Tue February 26, 2013 5:10 pm

Eric Church, whose Chief topped the Billboard 200 album chart last week and is joined in the top 10 this week by three other country albums.
John Peets Courtesy of Capitol Records

7:48pm

Wed August 10, 2011
The Two-Way

Who Are The London Rioters And Why Are They Rioting?

A rioter throws a rock at police in Clarence Road in Hackney on Tuesday in London.
Dan Istitene Getty Images

So who are the British rioters and why are they doing it? It seems like an easy question, but it's been fairly hard to ascertain. In some ways, two distinct portraits of rioters have emerged. In some ways, they're typified by two videos that have made the rounds online.

One is of a disaffected youth that's underemployed and has nothing to lose. It is typified by a video of Pauline Pearce, a 45-year-old grandmother, who was walking through the streets of Hackney and confronted rioters with some blunt speech. Here's the video, but be warned there is some strong language in it:

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6:30pm

Wed August 10, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

For Stroke Prevention, A New Alternative To Warfarin

A new drug called rivaroxaban may not require as many blood tests for patients with atrial fibrillation than the current drug on the market.
Libby Chapman iStockphoto.com

A common form of irregular heartbeat called atrial fibrillation can cause blood clots, putting people at increased risk of stroke. The anticoagulant drug warfarin is used to reduce that risk, but since people respond to it very differently, it requires careful monitoring to avoid the risk of heavy bleeding. Now, researchers say a new drug called rivaroxaban looks to be as good as warfarin in preventing strokes.

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