NPR News

Pages

7:43am

Wed August 24, 2011
Business

Old Navy T-Shirts Rile Grammarians

Old Navy is out with a new line of T-shirts. The shirts read: Lets Go!! Because of the contraction, it should be Let's Go!! An apostrophe is needed.

7:35am

Wed August 24, 2011
The Two-Way

Irene Likely To Be 'Major Hurricane Later Today;' Mid-Atlantic Bracing

Here she comes. A National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration satellite photo of Hurricane Irene, taken Tuesday (Aug. 23, 2011). Cuba and Florida are to the left.
AFP/Getty Images

Hurricane Irene "continues to strengthen as it pounds the southeastern Bahamas," the National Hurricane Center reports, and "will likely become a major hurricane later today."

Irene is a "category two" hurricane at this moment. The Hurricane Center expects it will be upgraded to "category three," with winds of more than 111 mph, today.

Read more

7:00am

Wed August 24, 2011
The Two-Way

Gadhafi Vows To Fight; Irene Strengthens; East Coast Picks Up After Quake

Originally published on Wed August 24, 2011 7:06 am

Opposition fighters flashed the V-sign for victory during celebrations in Tripoli's newly named Martyrs Square, formerly known as Green Square, on Tuesday (Aug. 23, 2011).
Filippo Monteforte AFP/Getty Images

We'll have more on each of these topics shortly, but first we want to quickly pass on the main headlines related to the day's three major stories:

-- Libya: "From Hiding, Gadhafi Tells Libyans To Free Tripoli."

Read more

5:30am

Wed August 24, 2011
Law

NYPD Intelligence Unit Seen Pushing Rights Limits

Since the attacks of Sept. 11, 2001, the New York Police Department has become one of America's most aggressive gatherers of domestic intelligence. Its intelligence unit, directed by a retired CIA veteran, dispatches undercover officers to keep tabs on ethnic neighborhoods — sometimes in areas far outside their jurisdiction.

Read more

4:36am

Wed August 24, 2011
Africa

From Hiding, Gadhafi Tells Libyans To Free Tripoli

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:31 am

A Libyan rebel stands with his weapon at the Bab al-Aziziya compound in Tripoli a day after it was captured by rebel forces.
Patrick Baz AFP/Getty Images

Libyan loyalists launched counteroffensives throughout the capital on Wednesday, seemingly taking their cues from leader Moammar Gadhafi, who called on them from hiding to drive the "devils and traitors" from Tripoli.

Clashes erupted in a neighborhood next to Gadhafi's Bab al-Aziziya compound a day after the sprawling command-and-control center was overrun by thousands of rebel fighters. Pro-regime fighters attacked with shells and assault rifles in the Abu Salim area, which is home to a notorious prison and thought to be one of the last remaining regime strongholds in Tripoli.

Read more

4:00am

Wed August 24, 2011
Business

Business News

Renee Montagne has business news.

4:00am

Wed August 24, 2011
Around the Nation

Va. Town At Earthquake's Epicenter

Mineral, Va., was very close to the epicenter of Tuesday's 8.5 earthquake. It was the largest quake felt on the East Coast in 70 years.

4:00am

Wed August 24, 2011
Business

Swiss Banking Giant UBS To Cut Thousands Of Jobs

Swiss bank UBS announced yesterday it is cutting thousands of jobs around the world, but it will keep a minimum of two-thousand employees at its U.S. headquarters in Connecticut. Craig Lemoult of member station WSHU reports that leaves 15-hundred Connecticut workers uncertain about their future with the bank.

4:00am

Wed August 24, 2011
Africa

Gadhafi Vows To Fight On Against Libyan Rebels

The regime of Libyan leader Moammar Gadhafi continues to crumble. On Tuesday, rebels stormed Gadhafi's compound in the center of the capital Tripoli.

4:00am

Wed August 24, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

David Greene has the Last Word in business.

4:00am

Wed August 24, 2011
Business

Competitors' Apps Sour BlackBerry Users

Research In Motion has seen its once-dominant share of the smart phone market eaten away by the iPhone and Android. Bloomberg technology reporter Rich Jaroslovsky talks to Renee Montagne about RIM and the new BlackBerries.

12:01am

Wed August 24, 2011
Sweetness And Light

The Goal(post)-Oriented Pilgrimage

On his 56-year quest, Dick Wessels visited all the stadiums of all the Division One college football teams.
David Lee iStockphoto.com

All right, so the University of Miami's been caught in a humongous football scandal following Ohio State, North Carolina, Tennessee, Oregon, and, as the King of Siam used to say: "Etcetera, etcetera, etcetera."

What's more to add? The sport is totally out of control, and neither the college presidents nor the NCAA can do anything but make dopey, empty promises. So why bother? Let me, instead, tell you a nice college football story.

It is about a quest.

Read more

12:01am

Wed August 24, 2011
Planet Money

What Is Bitcoin?

The U.S. has the dollar. Japan has the yen. Now some people are trying to invent a new currency that's not tied to any country or government. It's called bitcoin.

Bitcoin is a lot like cash — for the online universe. It doesn't actually exist in the physical world. You can't hold bitcoins in your hand because they just live on computers and the Internet.

Read more

12:01am

Wed August 24, 2011
Music

The Muppets: Still Pulling Strings In The Music World

Kermit and the other Muppets get the all-star treatment on the newly released tribute Muppets: The Green Album.
Courtesy of Walt Disney Records

Muppets: The Green Album is an all-star tribute to the titular characters, featuring 12 classic Muppet songs reinterpreted by contemporary artists. One of them is Andrew Bird, who contributes a cover of Kermit the Frog's signature song, "Bein' Green." Bird says the meaning of the lyrics has evolved for him as he has grown older.

Read more

12:01am

Wed August 24, 2011
Asia

After Quake, Japanese Fishing Port Remains At Risk

Most of Kesennuma's large fishing boats either survived the tsunami or have been repaired. But many do not move from the dock, because most of the city's fish-processing factories still lie in ruins.
Frank Langfitt NPR

At first glance, the Japanese fishing port of Kesennuma looks like it's making a comeback from last March's devastating tsunami. A half-dozen fishing boats arrive one morning in this city of 70,000 and unload tons of bonito onto a partially rebuilt port.

The fish roll down a conveyor, beneath a fresh-water shower, and splash into plastic bins filled with ice water. Mitsuo Iwabuchi, a wholesaler bidding on the catch, says the port is improving, but the infrastructure that drives it, including scores of fish-processing and ice-making factories, still lies in ruins.

Read more

12:01am

Wed August 24, 2011
Around the Nation

Ala. Businesses Riled By State's New Immigration Law

The dispute over immigration policy is being fought in an Alabama federal court Wednesday.

The state's Republican leaders say they passed the toughest immigration bill in the country to preserve jobs for Alabamians. But critics say the law goes too far, criminalizing all kinds of contact with undocumented residents and putting an extra burden on small business.

Read more

7:07pm

Tue August 23, 2011
The Two-Way

Legendary Women's Basketball Coach Pat Summitt Diagnosed With Alzheimer's

Pat Summitt, college basketball's winningest coach, said in an interview that she had been diagnosed with early onset dementia, Alzheimer's type.

The legendary coach, who has 1,071 career victories and eight national championships as the University of Tennessee's women's basketball coach, also said she would continue coaching.

Read more

6:08pm

Tue August 23, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Medicare Trying Bundled Payments To Save Money, Improve Care

iStockphoto.com

For all those who say there's nothing in the Affordable Care Act that could reduce health care spending, this one's for you.

Medicare officials have unveiled the latest initiative to spring from last year's overhaul, and it's one some health economists have been lusting after for years: Bundling payments so that hospitals, doctors, and even post-hospital caregivers all have the same financial incentive to both work together and provide cost-effective care.

Read more

5:51pm

Tue August 23, 2011
The Two-Way

Why A Quake In Virginia Isn't As Rare As It Sounds

Nelson Hsu NPR

The earthquake that rattled the East Coast Tuesday afternoon, from its Virginia epicenter to Washington and the islands off Massachusetts, was, indeed, rare, geologists say.

But only because of its size; at a magnitude of 5.8, it was the largest temblor to hit Virginia since 1897, when the largest quake on record, a 5.9 quake, struck.

"Earthquakes in central Virginia are not very unusual," says David Spears, Virginia's state geologist. "We have them every few years, but they're usually in the two-to-four magnitude range."

Read more

5:45pm

Tue August 23, 2011
The Two-Way

After Quake, Rush To Phone Loved Ones Overwhelmed Networks

People reach for their cellphones outside the courthouse in Manhattan after an earthquake rattled the East Coast on Tuesday.
Nicholas Kamm AFP/Getty Images

After an earthquake shook the East Coast on Tuesday, many people reached for their cellphones and tried to call loved ones. And many couldn't get through — but it wasn't the earthquake's fault.

No damaged cell towers or wires were reported by the major mobile carriers following the quake, which struck just before 2 p.m. EST and registered a magnitude of 5.8 at its epicenter in Virginia.

So what caused the problems?

Read more

5:00pm

Tue August 23, 2011
The Record

Nick Ashford, Songwriter And Singer, Has Died

Nickolas Ashford and Valerie Simpson on stage in New York around 1978.
Richard E. Aaron Redferns

Nick Ashford's songs are so ingrained in American culture they almost seem to have written themselves — songs such as "Ain't No Mountain High Enough" and "You're All I Need to Get By." Ashford was married to his songwriting partner, Valerie Simpson, for over 30 years. Ashford died Monday at the age of 70.

Ashford and Simpson wrote "Ain't Nothing Like The Real Thing" for Marvin Gaye and Tammy Terrell, "Reach Out and Touch (Somebody's Hand)" for Diana Ross and "Solid as a Rock" for themselves.

Read more

4:57pm

Tue August 23, 2011
Africa

A New Obstacle To Normal Relations For Sudan, U.S.

Sudan's President Omar al-Bashir speaks of the capital Khartoum on July 12. Sudan says it should be taken off the U.S. terrorism list, but Washington says it is concerned about new fighting in the south of the country.
Ashraf Shazly AFP/Getty Images

When Sudan allowed South Sudan to become an independent nation last month, it hoped this would put an end to years of friction with the United States.

More specifically, Sudan desperately wanted to be removed from Washington's list of state sponsors of terrorism and get out from under the many sanctions that come along with that designation.

But now the U.S. and the United Nations are raising concerns about fighting, and possible atrocities, near the border between Sudan and South Sudan.

Read more

4:53pm

Tue August 23, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Eating More Nuts And Soy May Help Beat High Cholesterol

Got high cholesterol? Soybeans might help.
iStockphoto.com

If you've got high cholesterol, you know the diet advice: Go easy on foods high in saturated fat like red meat and cheese, and eat lots of fiber and whole grains.

The message still holds up, but researchers say it's time to tweak the message.

Read more

4:53pm

Tue August 23, 2011
Law

Clergy Sue To Stop Alabama's Immigration Law

Alabama's new immigration law gets its first test in federal court Wednesday.

The Justice Department and civil rights groups are suing to stop what's considered to be the toughest illegal immigration crackdown coming out of the states.

But the law is also being challenged from a Bible Belt institution.

'It Goes Against Tenets Of Our Christian Faith'

At First United Methodist Church in downtown Birmingham, clergy from around the city take turns leading a prayer service called in response to the new immigration law.

Read more

4:40pm

Tue August 23, 2011
Africa

A New Libyan Leadership Could Recover Billions

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:31 am

A young Libyan in Benghazi celebrates Tuesday over news that Moammar Gadhafi's rule appears to be at an end. The U.S. says it is prepared to unfreeze Libyan assets quickly and make them available to a new government.
Alexandre Meneghini AP

The United States wants to give Libya its money back.

The U.S. froze some $30 billion worth of the country's assets after leader Moammar Gadhafi launched a harsh crackdown on his opponents earlier this year. With Gadhafi's rule now near or at its end, U.S. officials and their European counterparts are prepared to quickly unfreeze those funds for a new Libyan leadership.

Read more

4:29pm

Tue August 23, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Feds Launch App Contest For Facebook 'Lifelines' In Health Emergencies

The first thing East Coasters did when the ground began to shake this afternoon wasn't duck under their desks, but to turn to their smartphones.

The 5.8 magnitude earthquake that was felt from Durham, N.C., to Toronto was documented instantly through social media like Facebook and Twitter.

Read more

3:53pm

Tue August 23, 2011
The Two-Way

VIDEO: White House, Capitol As Earthquake Hits

The AP has just provided this video of the White House and the Capitol as the 5.8 magnitude earthquake hit the East Coast. Make sure you watch the roof closely as the security detail reacts to the rumbling:

Update at 4:17 p.m. ET. Earthquake Interrupts DSK Press Conference:

Here's another video of the earthquake interrupting a press conference with Dominique Strauss-Kahn's lawyer:

Read more

3:00pm

Tue August 23, 2011
NPR Story

Rebels Storm Gadhafi's Tripoli Compound

Libyan rebels stormed Moammar Gadhafi's Tripoli compound Tuesday, after loyalist troops relented. NPR correspondent Lourdes Garcia-Navarro entered the compound after them and tells Robert Siegel about scenes of jubilant anti-Gadhafi fighters ransacking the barracks.

3:00pm

Tue August 23, 2011
NPR Story

Why Do Middle Eastern Dictators Love Scuds?

Libyan government forces fired a Scud missile Monday near Sirte. It's at least the second time the Scud has been used in the conflict. Ousted Egyptian President Hosni Mubarak also had Scuds in his arsenal. Brian Palmer gives Robert Siegel a brief history of the Soviet-made missile and tells us why Middle Eastern dictators love the Scud. Palmer writes the Explainer column for Slate.com.

3:00pm

Tue August 23, 2011
NPR Story

Letters: Greek Yogurt; Summer Sounds

Robert Siegel and Melissa Block read emails from listeners.

Pages