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12:31pm

Mon August 29, 2011
The Two-Way

NASA: International Space Station May Have To Fly Solo

Originally published on Mon August 29, 2011 1:46 pm

The International Space Station and the docked space shuttle Endeavour, flying at an altitude of approximately 220 miles, on May 23, 2011.
Paolo Nespoli NASA

The International Space Station may have to fly solo this fall. All of the astronauts, NASA said today, might have to leave the station in late November if Russian spacecrafts can't make trips to the station.

The AP reports:

If Russian Soyuz rockets remain grounded beyond mid-November, there will be no way to launch new crews before the current residents are supposed to leave.

A Russian supply ship was destroyed during liftoff last week. The rocket is similar to what's used to launch astronauts.

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12:00pm

Mon August 29, 2011
The Two-Way

Before And After Irene, Ron Paul's No Fan Of FEMA

Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX), at the 2011 Republican Leadership Conference in New Orleans on June 17, 2011.
Justin Sullivan Getty Images

Rep. Ron Paul (R-TX) said before Hurricane Irene rolled over the mid-Atlantic and up through New England that the Federal Emergency Management Agency does more harm than good because "all they do is come in and tell you what to do and [what you] can't do" and add billions of dollars to the federal deficit.

Plus, he added, the agency did not perform well after Hurricane Katrina pummeled New Orleans' levees six years ago — devastating that city.

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11:18am

Mon August 29, 2011
The Two-Way

Wisconsin Town Bars Republicans From Labor Day Parade

Wisconsin politics — which hasn't been pretty of late — has made its way into a local Labor Day parade. The organizers of the Wausau Labor Day parade announced they would not let Republican lawmakers take part in the Sept. 5 display. The parade is organized by 30 local unions.

The Milwaukee Journal-Sentinel reports:

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10:40am

Mon August 29, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Pediatricians Put The Kibosh On Boxing For Kids

Time for kids to take the gloves off, pediatricians say.
Lori Sparkia iStockphoto.com

Whatever you think about the merits of boxing as a sport for adults, pediatricians say children have no place in the ring.

Citing the risk of injuries, including concussions, the American Academy of Pediatrics and its Canadian counterpart, the Canadian Paedeatric Society, have come out in opposition to boxing as a sport for children and adolescents.

Pediatricians should strongly discourage parents from letting their kids box and suggest sports "that do not encourage intentional head injuries," says a new policy statement from the two national groups for pediatricians.

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10:30am

Mon August 29, 2011
The Two-Way

VIDEO: Firefighters Save Couple From Flooded SUV In Vermont

Among the many photos and videos taken by people up and down the East during and after Hurricane Irene passed through are three clips taken Sunday in Mount Holly, Vt., as local firefighters rescued a couple from their vehicle.

WPTZ-TV of Plattsburgh, N.Y., has them posted here. It says they were taken by "u local contributor Melody Bothers Katrobos."

"Part III" shows the successful conclusion.

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10:27am

Mon August 29, 2011
Monkey See

Why Did I Watch Fourteen Hours Of The Weather Channel? I'm Not Sure.

Originally published on Mon August 29, 2011 11:49 am

In this handout image provided by The Weather Channel, Jim Cantore reports on Hurricane Irene from Battery Park on Sunday.
Getty Images

If you follow me on Twitter, you already know that I spent all day Saturday watching The Weather Channel. It started very early in the morning when I woke up nervous and headed out to the living room. The hurricane hadn't even made landfall yet, but they already had a guy on the beach who had been assigned to watch over a wooden pier to see if it would collapse. "I appreciate The Weather Channel's nonstop coverage of America's Pier," I said to practically nobody, since practically nobody was awake.

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9:50am

Mon August 29, 2011
The Two-Way

Happy Feet, The Lost Penguin, Is Headed Home

Safe journey, little guy: Happy Feet in his container aboard the research vessel Tangaroa earlier today.
Hagen Hopkins Getty Images

Two months after he showed up 2,000 miles from home, Happy Feet the three-year-old Emperor Penguin is on a ship that will give him a big head start on his way from New Zealand to Antarctica.

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9:05am

Mon August 29, 2011
The Two-Way

Consumer Spending Rebounds; Obama Chooses New Economic Adviser

Consumer spending rose 0.8 percent in July from June, the Bureau of Economic Analysis just reported. The increase came as personal income rose 0.3 percent.

Spending had dipped 0.1 percent in June from May. That had raised concerns about whether consumers — who buy about 70 percent of all goods and services — might pull an already weak economy down further.

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8:55am

Mon August 29, 2011
The Two-Way

What's Got Folks Talking? Beyonce's Baby Bump

Originally published on Mon August 29, 2011 9:26 am

Beyonce during her performace Sunday.
Kevin Winter Getty Images

Our pal Linda Holmes over at Monkey See knows much more about these types of things than we do, but we do want to take a quick break from natural disasters and other heavy news to note that megastar Beyonce Knowles apparently stole the show at Sunday's MTV Video Music Awards by cleverly revealing to the world that she and Jay-Z are expecting a child.

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8:15am

Mon August 29, 2011
It's All Politics

Powell Isn't Sure He'll Support Obama In 2012 Race

Originally published on Mon August 29, 2011 8:19 am

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell during his appearance Sunday on CBS News' Face the Nation.
Chris Usher CBS News via Getty Images

It was a big story when former Secretary of State Colin Powell, a Republican, endorsed Democrat Barack Obama during the 2008 presidential campaign.

So it's news that this weekend on CBS-TV's Face the Nation, Powell said he hasn't decided if he will vote for the president in 2012.

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8:15am

Mon August 29, 2011
The Two-Way

Powell: Cheney's Taking 'Cheap Shots'

Originally published on Mon August 29, 2011 8:55 am

Former Secretary of State Colin Powell during his appearance Sunday on CBS News' Face the Nation.
Chris Usher CBS News via Getty Images

Colin Powell isn't a fan of Dick Cheney's new memoir.

On CBS News' Face the Nation this weekend, former Bush administration secretary of state Powell said that Bush-era vice president Cheney takes some "cheap shots" and "overshot the runway" in the book that goes on sale this week.

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7:45am

Mon August 29, 2011
The Two-Way

New Leader Set In Japan; Gadhafi Still On Run

Good morning.

Residents from North Carolina up through New England are beginning the long process of recovering from Hurricane Irene, which we followed through the weekend and earlier today.

We'll keep an eye out for more stories about the storm and its aftermath. Meanwhile, other major news of the day includes:

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7:26am

Mon August 29, 2011
Around the Nation

School Superintendent Gives Himself A Big Pay Cut

Larry Powell is superintendent of 325 schools in Fresno County, Calif. Powell is giving back $800,000 over the next three years. He wants to preserve education programs from budget cuts. He'll work his final three years before retirement making less than a starting teacher's salary.

7:20am

Mon August 29, 2011
Around the Nation

Baltimore's Mayor Inadvertently Wakes Up The City

Some Baltimore residents were getting robocalls from the mayor around 4 a.m. Saturday reminding them that Hurricane Irene was on the way. The city's automatic phone calls were supposed to stop by 9 p.m. Friday, but a glitch kept them going through the night.

7:15am

Mon August 29, 2011
The Two-Way

Irene: Not A Monster, But Lots Of Damage

Originally published on Mon August 29, 2011 7:27 am

Flooding Sunday in Waitsfield, Vt.
Sandy Macys AP

Hurricane Irene is gone, but she won't be forgotten anytime soon.

As NPR's Larry Abramson said today on Morning Edition, "Irene did not turn out to be the storm of the century" and many beach towns "were stunned by how lucky they were."

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4:09am

Mon August 29, 2011
Around the Nation

Irene: Wet, Deadly And Expensive, But No Monster

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:29 am

A surfer in Long Beach, N.Y., passes heavy machinery Monday that was removing the remnants of a lifeguard shack that was knocked off its footing during Irene.
Craig Ruttle AP

The remnants of Hurricane Irene moved north Monday into Canada, leaving behind a path of destruction after raking the mid-Atlantic and northeast, where residents faced damaging floods triggered by hours of torrential rains.

While Irene's maximum wind speed might not compare with other legendary hurricanes, the storm had tremendous reach. A couple of days after it beat up on North Carolina, it still had enough strength to pummel Vermont and other parts of New England.

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4:00am

Mon August 29, 2011
Africa

Libyan Loyalists Keep Fighting For Moammar Gadhafi's Regime

In Libya, the tide has turned against Moammar Gadhafi and his supporters. And that has left an uncomfortable question for the new rebel authority: What to do with his loyalists and supporters?

4:00am

Mon August 29, 2011
NPR Story

India's Government, Anti-Corruption Crusader End Deadlock

An aging anti-corruption crusader in India has ended a two-week fast. He and the government reached a compromise on dealing with officials and politicians who demand bribes. Millions were riveted by the standoff.

4:00am

Mon August 29, 2011
Business

Business News

Japan's finance minister moves to the prime minister's office after the country's ruling party voted him in Monday. Yoshihiko Noda is known as a fiscal hawk. Noda will be Japan's sixth prime minister in only five years.

4:00am

Mon August 29, 2011
Around the Nation

Not A Monster Storm, But Irene Still Packed A Punch

Hurricane Irene destroyed houses, flooded cities and caused billions of dollars of damage. But the destruction was less than expected because Irene turned out to be less powerful than forecasters predicted.

4:00am

Mon August 29, 2011
Business

The Last Word In Business

Originally published on Mon August 29, 2011 7:16 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, host:

Our last word in business today is tempest in a teapot. I know it's a cliche, but there is really no other way to describe the storm brewing over a change that the British tea maker Twinings made to its Earl Grey recipe in the UK. The distinctive flavor of Earl Grey comes from bergamot oil. Bergamot is a kind of orange, and Twinings recently jazzed up the 180-year-old recipe with some extra citrus flavor.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

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4:00am

Mon August 29, 2011
Analysis

Politics: Irene Is Not Just A Weather Story

Major storms like Hurricane Irene often bring with them political consequences. Over the last few days, politicians from the president on down to local mayors, have been showing up on the airwaves.

4:00am

Mon August 29, 2011
Around the Nation

Some Areas Stunned By Irene's Mild Touch

While Hurricane Irene did not turn to be the storm of the century, it did cause millions to lose power, forced hundreds of thousands to be evacuated and resulted in a number of fatalities.

4:00am

Mon August 29, 2011
Europe

Britain's Gang Violence Is Not A 'Quick Fix Issue'

David Greene interviews former LAPD and NYPD Chief William Bratton, who recently was tapped to be an adviser to the British government — as officials there try to reduce youth gang violence.

4:00am

Mon August 29, 2011
Around the Nation

Irene Spares Jersey Shore From Major Damage

Residents along the New Jersey Shore were expecting the worst from Hurricane Irene. Many there boarded up windows and put sand bags around front doors. But the region was spared all but minor damage.

4:00am

Mon August 29, 2011
Around the Nation

Washed Out Bridges Strand Vermont's Small Towns

Vermont became an unexpected casualty of Hurricane Irene. The storm dropped up to seven inches of rain Sunday — flooding streams and sending rivers crashing over their banks. In the state highway system alone, 12 bridges were washed out.

4:00am

Mon August 29, 2011
Around the Nation

Big Apple Reboots After Shutting Down For Irene

Originally published on Mon August 29, 2011 6:35 am

Transcript

DAVID GREENE, host:

It's MORNING EDITION from NPR News. Good morning Im David Greene. Renee Montagne is on assignment in Afghanistan.

STEVE INSKEEP, host:

And Im Steve Inskeep.

The nation's largest city works to return to business today after the flooding from Irene.

GREENE: New York took a direct hit from the storm. The destruction was not as awful in New York as some feared. Still, this is a metropolitan area of more than 19 million people.

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12:01am

Mon August 29, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Think You're An Auditory Or Visual Learner? Scientists Say It's Unlikely

iStockphoto.com

We've all heard the theory that some students are visual learners, while others are auditory learners. And still other kids learn best when lessons involve movement.

But should teachers target instruction based on perceptions of students' strengths? Several psychologists say education could use some "evidence-based" teaching techniques, not unlike the way doctors try to use "evidence-based medicine."

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12:01am

Mon August 29, 2011
Closing Walter Reed

Where Generations Of Soldiers Healed, And Moved On

Tyson Quink exercises at the National Naval Medical Center in Bethesda, MD. Quink, a former college football player, lost both of his legs three months into his deployment to Afghanistan.
Becky Lettenberger NPR

On a recent morning, John Pierce walked across the sprawling hospital campus of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center. On the lawn, he spotted people who have come to define the place in recent years.

"[They were] having physical fitness-type tests," Pierce says. "There were people with notebooks and things, like they record when you do your sit-ups and pushups — but these were a number of double amputees."

Pierce is the historian for the Walter Reed Society, which makes him an expert on the historic American hospital in Washington, D.C.

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12:01am

Mon August 29, 2011
Crisis In The Housing Market

'Land Bank' Knocks Out Some Foreclosure Problems

LaMont Rump of Fez Enterprises guides an excavator during the demolition of a house in Cleveland.
Mhari Saito for NPR

Cities have been tearing down crumbling, vacant houses for decades. The money for municipal demolition bills usually comes out of city budgets, but in Cleveland the housing crisis has started to change that equation.

Bill Beavers has lived on Cleveland's Dove Street since 1967. But on a frecent sunny morning, Beavers is sitting on a neighbor's front porch, watching something he has never seen on his block before.

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