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7:44am

Sat August 1, 2015
Middle East

Kurdish Militias Appear To Be Sidelined By U.S.-Turkey Military Deal

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 11:31 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

7:44am

Sat August 1, 2015
Middle East

Kerry Aims To Repair Relations With Egypt

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 11:31 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

7:44am

Sat August 1, 2015
Energy

Winds Of Change? Rhode Island Hopes For First Offshore Wind Farm

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 11:31 am

The first foundation jacket installed by Deepwater Wind in the nation's first offshore wind farm construction project is seen next to a construction crane on Monday, on the waters of the Atlantic Ocean off Block Island, R.I.
Stephan Savoia AP

Aboard a ferry off the coast of Rhode Island, state and federal officials take a close look at a steel structure poking out of the ocean. It's the first foundation affixed to the seafloor for a five-turbine wind farm off the state's coast.

It's a contrast to what's happening off the coast of Massachusetts. Developer Cape Wind has spent more than 10 years and millions of dollars there on a massive wind farm that it may never build.

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7:44am

Sat August 1, 2015
History

Edison's 'Little Monsters' Restored To Their Original Freakishness

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 11:31 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

A word of caution now. You're about to hear the old nursery rhyme "Little Jack Horner" in the creepy voice of one of the world's first talking dolls.

(SOUNDBITE OF TALKING DOLL)

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7:44am

Sat August 1, 2015
Asia

Some Kazakhs Celebrate The Loss Of The 2022 Winter Olympics

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 1:57 am

Boosters of Kazakhstan's bid for the 2022 Winter Olympics rally in Almaty as they wait for word of whether their city won. It didn't, forcing Kazakhstan back to the drawing board for ways to achieve international recognition.
Corey Flintoff NPR

There was a moment of drama in global sports on Friday, when the International Olympic Committee chose Beijing to host the 2022 Winter Games.

The loser was Almaty, Kazakhstan, a major city in an oil-rich central Asian nation that's trying to raise its profile on the international scene.

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7:44am

Sat August 1, 2015
Politics

SuperPac Filings, Candidates' Forums: The Week In Politics

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 11:31 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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7:44am

Sat August 1, 2015
Africa

Zimbabwe May Give Land Back To Some White Farmers

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 11:31 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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7:44am

Sat August 1, 2015
Europe

France Refuses To Sell Two Warships To Russia

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 11:31 am

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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7:44am

Sat August 1, 2015
Around the Nation

Police-Community Collaboration Has Helped Kept Peace In Cincinnati

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 11:31 am

Copyright 2015 WXXI Public Broadcasting. To see more, visit http://www.wxxi.org/.

Transcript

SCOTT SIMON, HOST:

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7:03am

Sat August 1, 2015
Goats and Soda

How Sierra Leone's Most Famous Journalist Helped NPR Get The Ebola Story

Umaru Fofana
Ben de la Cruz NPR

It's an open secret among journalists: When reporting a major news story in an unfamiliar country, it's great to have a "fixer."

That's the catch-all term we use for our local guides to language and logistics — the people who can translate documents, interpret during interviews and generally help you figure out the most efficient and the safest way to get from one location to the next.

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7:03am

Sat August 1, 2015
Shots - Health News

No Shame, No Euphemism: Suicide Isn't A Natural Cause Of Death

Keith Negley for NPR

Beware the mention of natural causes, as in my mother's obituary:

"Norita Wyse Berman, a writer, stockbroker and artist ... died at home Friday of natural causes. She was 60."

Sixty-year-olds don't die of natural causes anymore. The truth was too hard to admit.

Fifteen years on, I'm ashamed of my family's shame. Those attending her funeral and paying shiva calls knew the truth anyway. People talk.

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5:35am

Sat August 1, 2015
NPR Ed

Coding Camp to Baltimore Schools: Bring Us Your Bored!

Middle-school boys participate in the Minority Male Makers summer program at Morgan State University in Baltimore.
Elissa Nadworny NPR

On the second floor of Morgan State University's engineering building, Jacob Walker, 12, is putting the finishing touches on a ruler he's just created.

Not yet an actual ruler. One he's designing on the computer. He just needs to add his initials — then it's time to produce it on a 3-D printer.

Jacob starts seventh grade in the fall and has big dreams. Building this ruler is all part of the plan.

"When I was a child," he says, "I loved to play with Legos, and it inspired me to be an engineer when I get older."

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4:03am

Sat August 1, 2015
The Two-Way

Israeli Officials Promise To Find Arsonists Who Killed Palestinian Child

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 1:38 pm

Palestinian Prime Minister Rami Hamdallah inspects a home that was badly damaged from a suspected attack by Jewish extremists in the West Bank village of Douma. An 18-month-old child was killed and other family members seriously injured.
Prime Minister's Office APA/Landov

Israeli leaders vowed to find the suspected Israeli extremists behind an arson attack that killed a Palestinian toddler early Friday.

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5:48pm

Fri July 31, 2015
The Two-Way

Zimbabwe Official Calls For Extradition Of American Lion Hunter Walter Palmer

Zimbabwe is seeking the extradition of Walter Palmer, the American dentist who killed a famous lion named Cecil, which was being tracked in a university study.

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5:47pm

Fri July 31, 2015
The Two-Way

Decades Of Limbo Ends For Some Indians, Bangladeshis Along Border

At the stroke of midnight, tens of thousands of Indians and Bangladeshis living near the border between the two countries got their own country for the first time in 70 years.

As part of an agreement between the two nations, the fate of just under 15,000 people living in 51 Bangladeshi enclaves inside India and more than 37,000 in 111 Indian enclaves in Bangladesh has finally been determined. Most will stay where they are, but change their nationality. Some are moving, and some of them are leaving behind family members.

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5:43pm

Fri July 31, 2015
Environment

As Beijing Prepares To Host Winter Olympics, Where Will It Get The Snow?

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 7:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

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MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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5:43pm

Fri July 31, 2015
Goats and Soda

Ebola Vaccine Hailed As 'Game Changer' In Fight Against The Virus

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 7:53 pm

A woman receives the rVSV-ZEBOV Ebola vaccine at a clinical trial in Conakry, Guinea. The vaccine appears effective after only one shot.
Cellou Binani AFP/Getty Images

Doctors Without Borders is calling it a "champagne moment." The World Health Organization says it's a "game changer."

In a small trial, an experimental vaccine protected 100 percent of participants who were at high risk for the virus. Although the results are preliminary, they offer new hope of finally stamping out the virus in West Africa — and preventing the next epidemic.

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5:43pm

Fri July 31, 2015
Law

Juvenile Justice System Failing Native Americans, Studies Show

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 7:53 pm

Sgt. Barbara Johnson and Corrections Lt. Robbin Preston run the Tuba City Juvenile Detention Center on the Navajo Nation.
Laurel Morales NPR

State courts are twice as likely to incarcerate Native teens for minor crimes such as truancy and alcohol use than any other racial and ethnic group, according to the Tribal Law and Policy Institute. And juvenile detention facilities around the country have a disproportionately high number of Native American youth, according to an Indian Law and Order Commission report.

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5:26pm

Fri July 31, 2015
It's All Politics

Hillary Clinton Releases 8 Years Of Tax Returns

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 7:16 pm

Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton at a campaign event in Iowa earlier this week.
Scott Olson Getty Images

This post was updated at 6:45 p.m. ET

Democratic presidential hopeful Hillary Clinton released eight years worth of tax returns Friday, showing that she and her husband Bill Clinton earned $139 million since 2007. They paid nearly $44 million in federal taxes during that period. The couple's effective federal tax rate ranged from 25 percent in 2007 to 36 percent last year.

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4:45pm

Fri July 31, 2015
The Salt

Pesticide Drift Threatens Organic Farms

Originally published on Sun August 2, 2015 1:23 pm

Organic farmer Margot McMillen holds a grape leaf damaged by pesticide drift on her farm, Terra Bella Farm, in central Missouri.
Kristofor Husted Harvest Public Media

Chert Hollow Farm sits nestled between rows of tall trees and a nearby stream in central Missouri. Eric and Joanna Reuter have been running the organic farm since 2006. That means they don't plant genetically modified crops and can only use a few approved kinds of chemicals and fertilizers.

"We've traditionally raised about an acre and a half of pretty intensively managed produce, so it's a very productive acre and a half," Eric Reuter says.

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4:42pm

Fri July 31, 2015
NPR Ed

The Plan To Give Pell Grants To Prisoners

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 7:53 pm

Education Secretary Arne Duncan (second from left) speaks with inmate Terrell Johnson, a participant in the Goucher College Prison Education Partnership.
Patrick Semansky AP

Education Secretary Arne Duncan and Attorney General Loretta Lynch made a rare joint appearance on Friday — in prison.

They visited a state-run facility in Jessup, Md., to announce a new plan meant to help some of the 700,000 inmates who are released each year.

It's a pilot program to give prisoners access to federal Pell Grants that would pay for college classes behind bars.

"The cost-benefit of this does not take a math genius to figure out," Duncan said. "We lock folks up here, $35-40,000 every single year. A Pell Grant is less than $6,000 each year."

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4:36pm

Fri July 31, 2015
Planet Money

Letting Go Of The Wheel: How Google Is Easing People Into Self-Driving Cars

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 7:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

AUDIE CORNISH, HOST:

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4:36pm

Fri July 31, 2015
Europe

As Migrants Attempt Trip To The U.K., Many Who Make It Are Minors

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 7:53 pm

Copyright 2015 NPR. To see more, visit http://www.npr.org/.

Transcript

MELISSA BLOCK, HOST:

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3:55pm

Fri July 31, 2015
The Two-Way

U.K. Officials Instructed To Grant Ai Weiwei's Original U.K. Visa Request

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 5:20 pm

Ai Weiwei's original application for a six-month business visa was denied.
Miguel Villagran Getty Images

Dissident Chinese artist Ai Weiwei, who was originally granted only a 20-day visa to visit Britain, will now receive the six-month visa he applied for. A spokesperson for the U.K. Home Office explains that the head of the department, Theresa May, was not consulted over the staff's decision to allow only a shorter stay.

"She has reviewed the case and has now instructed Home Office officials to issue a full six-month visa," the spokesperson says. "We have written to Mr. Ai apologizing for the inconvenience caused."

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3:42pm

Fri July 31, 2015
The Two-Way

Judge Says Virginia Can Refuse To Issue Confederate License Plates

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 4:55 pm

Close on the heels of a U.S. Supreme Court decision that granted Texas the right to refuse to issue Confederate-themed license plates, a federal judge has effectively vacated a state injunction in Virginia that kept officials there from similarly blocking such plates.

Judge Jackson L. Kiser will issue a separate written order on whether the 1,700 Confederate license plates that have already been issued can be recalled by the state.

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3:35pm

Fri July 31, 2015
The Two-Way

Alan Cheuse, Novelist And Longtime NPR Contributor, Dies At 75

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 5:10 pm

Alan Cheuse, the novelist, teacher and longtime literary commentator for NPR, has died at the age of 75. His daughter, Sonya, confirmed that he died Friday of injuries sustained in a car accident in California two weeks ago.

"On behalf of the family, we are in deep grief at the loss of our beloved father, husband and grandfather," Sonya Cheuse told NPR. "He was the brightest light in our family. He will always remain in our hearts. We thank everyone for the outpouring of love and support."

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3:19pm

Fri July 31, 2015
It's All Politics

Hillary Clinton's Doctor Says She's Healthy Enough To Be President

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 6:21 pm

In a health care statement released Friday, a New York doctor wrote that Hillary Clinton "is in excellent physical condition and fit to serve as President of the United States."
Getty Images

The State Department's latest dump of Hillary Clinton's emails may dominate the news cycle in the coming days, but her campaign also released another crucial document on Friday — a clean bill of health for the Democratic front-runner.

The confirmation comes from Lisa Bardack, a New York-based doctor who has been Clinton's physician since 2001. In a letter, she declares Clinton "a healthy-appearing female," saying that Clinton exercises regularly, eats plenty of vegetables and fruits, doesn't smoke, and "drinks alcohol only occasionally."

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2:44pm

Fri July 31, 2015
The Salt

Cheetos, Canned Foods, Deli Meat: How The U.S. Army Shapes Our Diet

Originally published on Sat August 1, 2015 1:14 am

The U.S. military's need for longer-lasting rations led to the invention of many modern processed foods.
Library of Congress

Many of the foods that we chow down on every day were invented not for us, but for soldiers.

Energy bars, canned goods, deli meats — all have military origins. Same goes for ready-to-eat guacamole and goldfish crackers.

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2:33pm

Fri July 31, 2015
The Two-Way

Dylann Roof Pleads Not Guilty To Federal Hate Crime Charges

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 4:01 pm

Dylann Roof, 21, charged with murdering nine worshippers at a historic black church in Charleston, S.C., in June, listens during court proceedings earlier this month.
Randall Hill Reuters/Landov

Updated at 4 p.m. ET

A judge entered pleas of not guilty to 33 federal hate crime counts against Dylann Roof, the white suspect accused of gunning down nine parishioners at a black church in Charleston, S.C., last month.

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2:20pm

Fri July 31, 2015
The Two-Way

Federal Court Places A Stay On Order Compelling NCAA To Pay Athletes

Originally published on Fri July 31, 2015 3:01 pm

One day before a district court ruling was to go into effect that would force the NCAA to allow colleges to pay student-athletes $5,000 per year, the 9th U.S. Circuit Court of Appeals has placed a stay on that order.

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