11:31am

Mon April 18, 2011
Author Interviews

Jon Sarkin: When Brain Injuries Transform Into Art

Jon Sarkin was working as a chiropractor when he suffered a massive stroke. Afterwards, the 35-year-old became a volatile visual artist with a ferocious need to create, as his brain tried to make sense of the world at large.

"[My artwork is] a manifestation of what happened to me," Sarkin tells Fresh Air's Terry Gross. "I've learned how to visually represent my existential dilemma caused by my stroke."

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11:30am

Mon April 18, 2011
The Two-Way

Robots Peek Inside The Fukushima Nuclear Power Plant

Robots have started peering around inside the stricken Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant. That represents a major step toward stabilizing Japan's heavily damaged reactors, as Geoff Brumfiel reports:

The robots were built by the Massachusetts company iRobot and are usually used by the military to investigate bombs. They're small vehicles with a single claw for poking around. The ones that entered the reactor buildings are specially equipped with cameras and radiation detectors, which can give workers a better idea about conditions inside.

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11:28am

Mon April 18, 2011
Planet Money

S&P Warns: Fix The Deficit, Or Else

Standard & Poor's, a big ratings agency, is getting nervous about the United States' ability to pay its debt.

The agency lowered its outlook for the U.S. to negative this morning. That's essentially a warning.

It means that the U.S. is still a super-safe country to lend money to, in S&P's view. But if the U.S. doesn't get its act together in the next few years, that will change. (Here's a PDF of the full report from S&P.)

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10:43am

Mon April 18, 2011
Krulwich Wonders…

Carbon Goes Wild: The Global Warming Story

Well, it's that time of year. Friday is Earth Day, and this is the week that some of us pause to ponder the health of our planet (while others of us spend the week yelling at the people who are pausing to ponder the health of the planet). Being a pauser, not a yeller, I thought I'd spend this week sharing with you, especially the younger set of you, a series of cartoon essays about ... carbon. Why carbon?

"Water may be the solvent of the universe," writes Natalie Angier in her classic introduction to science, The Canon, "but carbon is the duct tape of life."

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10:43am

Mon April 18, 2011
Tiny Desk Concerts

Mount Kimbie: Tiny Desk Concert

  • Audio Only: Mount Kimbie's Tiny Desk Concert

Last fall on All Songs Considered, I shared a cut from one of my favorite acts of 2010, Mount Kimbie. When the show taped, I was in the middle of my love affair with Crooks and Lovers, a polished debut that felt both precise and spontaneous in its arrangements. Again and again, I wandered through the album's nuanced sounds: everything from unblemished pops echoing down winding tunnels to pitched-up samples of recent R&B. These were isolated, intimate listening sessions between my headphones and me.

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10:27am

Mon April 18, 2011
Life in Berlin

The 'Mottainai' Concept: A Buddhist Style Of Cooking In Neukoelln

"Share Your Food" is a new project in Berlin inspired by the way chef Taina Guedes cooks.

"You have to prepare everything to put your energy, your soul through the food. So you have to try mostly to make things without machines," Guedes says.

Guedes' vegetarian creations are a mix of Brazilian food and Japanese cuisine. The 32 year-old grew up in Sao Paulo and later became a chef in Japan.

She says she practices a Buddhist style of cooking.

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9:57am

Mon April 18, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Prominent Surgeon Resigns Post After Backlash Over Editorial

The American College of Surgeons, the leading group for the profession, will have a new president come this fall.

But it won't be Dr. Lazar Greenfield, a distinguished vascular surgeon who last year was honored by the group with an award for innovation and who was until this weekend the college's president-elect.

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9:55am

Mon April 18, 2011
Monkey See

The Sad, Beautiful Fact That We're All Going To Miss Almost Everything

The vast majority of the world's books, music, films, television and art, you will never see. It's just numbers.

Consider books alone. Let's say you read two a week, and sometimes you take on a long one that takes you a whole week. That's quite a brisk pace for the average person. That lets you finish, let's say, 100 books a year. If we assume you start now, and you're 15, and you are willing to continue at this pace until you're 80. That's 6500 hundred books, which really sounds like a lot.

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9:49am

Mon April 18, 2011
Go Figure

Updated Broadcast Ratings For NPR

In March, Arbitron released its national broadcast estimates for the Fall 2010 survey. National radio ratings are released twice a year and provide radio networks across the United States the opportunity to see how network shows are performing in terms of measured audience.

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9:17am

Mon April 18, 2011
The Two-Way

Lowe's Store Employees Save Themselves, Customers From Tornado

More on those tornadoes that hit the south over the weekend, killing at least 45 people.

The bright spot in the tragedy is the 100 or so customers and employees in a Lowe's Home Improvement store in Sanford, N.C., who managed to save themselves through quick thinking.

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