11:27pm

Thu April 28, 2011
Movie Reviews

Werner Herzog, Plumbing Time And 'Dreams'

He has had encounters with happy people, in the wild blue yonder and at the end of the world. Now Werner Herzog, our most blessedly batty cinematic explorer, has set his sights on the beginning of time — or as close as he can get. In Cave of Forgotten Dreams, he wangles his way into the notoriously well protected Chauvet cave system in southern France to film Paleolithic paintings that go back more than 30,000 years. The result is a journey to prehistory that's simultaneously wondrous and tedious, profound and completely nuts — which is to say, quintessential Herzog.

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11:26pm

Thu April 28, 2011
Movie Reviews

'Earthwork': On An Urban Canvas, An Artist's Eden

With bigger canvases come bigger artistic challenges; at least that's the case when the canvas can be measured in acres instead of inches or feet.

Stan Herd is a crop artist, a man who carves pictures out of the earth using soil, lumber, flowers and vegetables as his paint, in works so large they can only be properly seen from high above. That's a lot of effort and expense for art that can't get to a gallery, and that's seen by precious few people before being plowed under.

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11:24pm

Thu April 28, 2011
Movie Reviews

In Russia, Loving 'Raymond' Takes Serious Work

"My job was to create a family, a very specific family," says creator Phil Rosenthal of his immensely successful sitcom Everybody Loves Raymond, but he's only half-right. While it's true that Rosenthal and his collaborators, led by comedian Ray Romano, mined the domestic minutiae of a middle-class family for nine years, 210 episodes, and an ongoing eternity in syndication, Everybody Loves Raymond didn't exactly reinvent television.

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5:34pm

Thu April 28, 2011
The Guantanamo Papers

At Guantanamo, Big Threats Found In Small Clues

If al-Qaida could learn anything from the latest classified documents released by WikiLeaks, it would be this: Lose the Casio watch. More specifically, lose the Casio F-91W — either the black plastic or silver bracelet version.

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Larry Groce has been host and artistic director of West Virginia Public Radio's Mountain Stage since its beginning in 1983. His taste and personality have helped set the tone of this long running radio and television series.

Larry was born in Dallas, Texas, in 1948 and attended Adamson High School in the Oak Cliff section of that city. It was apparently fertile ground for aspiring singer-songwriters at the time as Michael Martin Murphy ("Wildfire"), Ray Wylie Hubbard ("Up Against the Wall Redneck Mothers") and the late B.W. Stevenson ("My Maria") attended along with Larry. Stevie Ray and Jimmie Vaughn and Edie Brickel also grew up in Oak Cliff.

5:26pm

Thu April 28, 2011
Mountain Stage

Hazel Dickens On Mountain Stage

On Tuesday, April 26, 2011, Hazel Dickens was laid to rest in Princeton, W. Va. If ever one voice captured the spirit of the hard-scrabble southern West Virginia coal fields, it was hers.

When you hear Hazel's voice and songs, many words come to mind: honest, weathered, plain, deep, country, bold, distilled and undiluted, rugged and maybe a bit ragged. May Hazel rest in peace as her songs live on in the hearts of many.

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5:21pm

Thu April 28, 2011
It's All Politics

Obama's Reshuffled National Security Team Has Familiar, Bush-Era Feel

Originally published on Thu April 28, 2011 5:35 pm

President Obama announces the reshuffling of his national security team, April 28, 2011.
SAUL LOEB AFP/Getty Images

Something to note about the members of President Obama's reshuffled national security team is that they should all be fairly easily confirmed by the Senate which has confirmed all of them for other key posts.

Something else to note is that at least when it comes to the national security experts who flanked him Thursday, partisanship really does seem to end at the waters' edge, at least with Obama.

Several of those named to new jobs on Monday played prominent roles on President George W. Bush's national-security team.

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5:12pm

Thu April 28, 2011
Three Books...

Three Books To Take To A Fistfight

I'm not a violent man by nature, but I've had my scrapes and I've seen more than a few and if there's one unassailable truth I know about a fist-fight it's this: it doesn't matter who strikes first, or most, but only who strikes last. In a fight, to endure is everything. I'm not sure you can ever say someone "wins" a fight, but the last one standing generally stakes that claim. In that vein, the following three books follow winners who endure the slaps and stomps and gouges of a hard life fought well.


Butcher's Crossing

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5:02pm

Thu April 28, 2011
Around the Nation

As Gas Prices Rise, Oil Company Tax Breaks Debated

Exxon Mobil said Thursday that its profits surged during the first three months of the year: The company said it earned $10.6 billion during that period — an increase of 69 percent.

These higher profits come at a time when gasoline prices are exceeding $4 a gallon in some states. So, in Washington, there's once again talk of eliminating some of the tax breaks the industry receives.

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5:00pm

Thu April 28, 2011
Movie Reviews

'Prom': A Teen Comedy, Hold The Sex And Rebellion

From the Walt Disney Company's wholesome-produce department, the pleasantly retro teen movie Prom comes bearing no offense. Which is nice for parents seeking healthy alternatives to, say, Glee or, worse, Pretty Little Liars — if slightly worrying to those of us who grew up on the necessity of youthful rebellion.

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