12:01am

Fri May 27, 2011
Research News

Of War And Kisses: How Adversity Shapes Culture

An Israeli Air Force cadet kisses his girlfriend before being sworn in for duty in 2003. A new study that measures the rigidity of a culture's social rules and standards — including when and where it's appropriate to kiss — found Israel to be culturally loose.
Marco Di Lauro Getty Images

Countries tend to have personalities just like people do. Researchers have set out to define those differences, using a scale that measures how tight the social rules and standards are. They find that cultural rules — as simple as when and where it's appropriate to kiss — are often shaped by a nation's experience with war, disease and other challenges.

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12:01am

Fri May 27, 2011
Hidden World Of Girls

Family History: The General, His Sisters And Me

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 12:24 pm

Military officials salute the casket of Gen. Vang Pao in Fresno, Calif.
Lianne Milton for NPR

As an American teenager, whenever I asked grown-ups about the Vietnam War, few wanted to discuss it. As an adult, it was just as hard to talk about the war. That's why I never told friends and neighbors about my family's history.

You see, the Vietnam War took place in my family's backyard. My family lived in northeastern Laos, in Nong Het, right on the border with Vietnam. When the CIA needed an ally, they found a charismatic, passionate young man not afraid to die.

That man was my great-uncle, the late Gen. Vang Pao.

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12:01am

Fri May 27, 2011
Asia

In Pakistan, Doubts Bin Laden Is Dead

We're on a crowded shopping street in Lahore, Pakistan, alongside the shrine to Data Ganj Baksh, one of the holiest places in the country. The shrine of a Muslim saint, it's a giant rectangle surrounded on all sides by giant white stone arches. This location was bombed last year. So we thought Thursday night, a very busy night at the shrine, would be a good night to ask people about what's happening in Pakistan.

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12:01am

Fri May 27, 2011
Politics

Consumer Agency: A Political Lightning Rod

Elizabeth Warren, assistant to the president and special adviser to the Treasury secretary on the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, testifies before a House Oversight Committee hearing on Tuesday.
Saul Loeb AFP/Getty Images

The Consumer Financial Protection Bureau will on July 21 officially become the nation's newest government agency — and the only one with the singular aim of looking out for the best interests of consumers. The agency is controversial, and at the center of it all is the woman whom President Obama asked to set it up: Elizabeth Warren.

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12:00am

Fri May 27, 2011
Kentucky Arts and Culture

Musical Monsters Mark Milestone at Opera House

To celebrate its anniversary the Lexington Opera House is turning itself over to some musical monsters.  Rich Copley, who’s an arts and cultural reporter with the Lexington Herald Leader, offers a preview of their 2011-2012 season.  He also looks ahead at the season planned for next year at the Norton Center for the Arts.

10:20pm

Thu May 26, 2011
NPR Story

Excerpt: 'To Do: A Book of Alphabets and Birthdays'

 

Alphabets and names make games and everybody has a name and all the same they have in a way to have a birthday.

The thing to do is to think of names.

Names will do.

Mildew.

And you have to think of alphabets too, without an alphabet well without names where are you, and birthdays are very favorable too, otherwise who are you.

Everything begins with A.

What did you say. I said everything begins with A and I was right and hold me tight and be all right.

Everything begins with A.

A. Annie, Arthur, Active, Albert.

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10:00pm

Thu May 26, 2011
StoryCorps

Army Couple Deploys To Iraq, But Only One Returns

Max Voelz and his wife, Kim, were both part of the 703rd Explosive Ordnance Detachment, based in Fort Knox, Ky.
StoryCorps

Max and Kim Voelz served together in Iraq in the same Explosive Ordnance Disposal unit — that's the Army's elite bomb squad.

The couple met on Valentine's Day in 1997 at EOD school. They married on June 12, 1999.

"We deployed in 2003. We were in the same unit. She ripped bombs apart by hand in Iraq just like I did," Max says. "There was no being scared, no doubt, no 'I might die' — we never talked about that."

One night in 2003, Max called in the location of an explosive and sent his wife to disarm it.

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6:29pm

Thu May 26, 2011
The Two-Way

Senate Approves Extension Of Patriot Act Anti-Terror Provisions

With a 73-23 vote, the Senate voted to approve a four-year extension of three controversial provisions of the Patriot Act.

The AP reports:

It extends two provisions of the 2001 USA Patriot Act, one allowing roving wiretaps, the other allowing searches of business records in the pursuit of terror threats. A third provision gives the government power to watch non-American "lone wolf" suspects with no certain ties to terrorist groups.

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6:20pm

Thu May 26, 2011
It's All Politics

Bill Clinton Retracted GOPish Debt-Ceiling Remark After White House Request

It was more than passing strange when former President Bill Clinton said Wednesday that the nation could endure a short default on its debt without a calamity ensuing.

His precise words at a fiscal summit hosted by the Peter G. Peterson Foundation were:

"If we defaulted on the debt once for a few days, it might not be calamitous. But if people thought we were literally not going to pay our bills anymore, then they would stop buying our debt."

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5:51pm

Thu May 26, 2011
The Two-Way

Libyan Government Proposes Cease-Fire, Says It's Ready To Negotiate

The AP reports that the Libyan government is pushing for a cease-fire and that Prime Minister Al-Baghdadi al-Mahmoudi told reporters in Tripoli that he was ready to talk to the rebels.

The AP adds:

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