8:00am

Sat September 17, 2011
Education

Shrinking Budgets Put School Support On The Block

Across the country, a group of education administrators, known as regional superintendents, are seeing their budgets shrink. These administrators are involved in providing services like teacher certification and other support for school districts. In Illinois, the state's 44 regional superintendents have been working without pay since the governor zeroed out their funding in July. Maria Altman of St. Louis Public Radio reports that the issue of whether or not these officials are needed at all is coming to a head.

7:02am

Sat September 17, 2011
Economy

Median Male Worker's Income Lower Than In 1973

Tuesday the government's annual poverty and income report revealed that the earnings of male workers in the middle of the income ladder are lower today than they were almost 40 years ago.

In 1973 the median male worker earned just over $49,000 when adjusted for inflation, while in 2010 that worker made about $1,500 less. Yet, in the same period, the output of the economy has more than doubled, and the productivity of workers has risen steadily.

What Has Changed

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6:28am

Sat September 17, 2011
Around the Nation

Irene Aftermath: When It Rains, It Spores

Black trumpet mushrooms are among the 24 varieties of mushrooms that Pat McDonagh of Northampton, Mass., eats. She says that there are more than 1,000 varieties in the woods — and there's been an abundance since Hurricane Irene tore through the Northeast.
Anne Mostue for NPR

When Hurricane Irene tore through the Northeast last month, it caused severe flooding and damage to homes, trees and power lines. But it also left behind something rather delicate — mushrooms.

Foragers say they've seen more fungi in the past few weeks than ever before.

On a recent weekday morning in Northampton, Mass., three 50-something adults wander into the woods. The oak leaves fall alongside the pine needles, and the tall maple trees are just starting to show color.

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6:10am

Sat September 17, 2011
Around the Nation

'On The Edge' In Mississippi: Residents Cling To Land

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:23 am

Occasional flooding is part of life on the batture, between the Mississippi River and the levee.
Kevin O'Mara

In the netherworld of the batture between the levee and the Mississippi River near New Orleans, there is a small community built on stilts. Locals call them "camps": a dozen eccentric structures — some rundown, some handsome, all handmade — clinging to the river side of the great dike.

One man has been fighting for years to claim this land, which he says belongs to his family, but those living on the batture don't seem too worried about losing their homes.

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5:29am

Sat September 17, 2011
World

U.S. Underwhelmed With Emerging Powers At U.N.

It's the time of year when world leaders converge at the United Nations headquarters in New York. And this year, there will be a lot of talk about multilateral diplomacy — a priority for the Obama administration since it came to office.

Obama's team has courted the world's rising powers, even publicly backing India's hopes to one day be a permanent member of the U.N. Security Council. But now that India, along with South Africa and Brazil, have rotating seats on the council, U.S. officials and many human rights activists complain they're not living up to expectations.

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3:45am

Sat September 17, 2011
Making Babies: 21st Century Families

A New Openness For Donor Kids About Their Biology

Originally published on Sat September 17, 2011 9:52 am

Tina and Patrick Gulbrandson, with their daughter, Waverly.
Marisa Penaloza NPR

First in a two-part report.

Women inseminated with a donor's sperm used to be advised to tell no one. Go home, doctors said, make love to your husband and pretend that worked. But in a trend that mirrors that of adoption — from secrecy to openness — more parents now do plan to tell such children how they were conceived and are seeking advice on how best to do that.

Tina Gulbrandson understands the temptation of secrecy. She felt stigma and pain when she needed to use another woman's eggs to get pregnant.

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8:35pm

Fri September 16, 2011
Animals

Glowing Kittens Fight AIDS

Mayo Clinic

Here's an experiment: turn off your lights. Shine a blue flashlight on the cats in the room. Look for the ones that turn neon green, like a glow stick.

That's how scientists at the Mayo clinic identify cats that they've successfully treated against the feline immunodeficiency virus.

The AIDS epidemic is well-known amongst humans. Less known is that every year, millions of cats suffer and die from the infection.

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7:40pm

Fri September 16, 2011
Economy

Economist: U.S. Skating On Thin Ice

iStockphoto.com

Last year economist Lakshman Achuthan said he thought the United States had emerged from the depths of a recession, but today the picture looks a bit more grim. Unemployment is hovering above 9 percent and there were no new jobs created in August. On top of that, consumer confidence is at its second-lowest level of the year.

"We are skating on very thin ice," Achuthan tells Guy Raz, host of weekends on All Things Considered.

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5:55pm

Fri September 16, 2011
The Two-Way

NY Cabbies Win Right Veto Racy Ads On Vehicles

Some New York cab drivers have complained that the companies they work for were putting racy ads — for strip clubs, for example — on their cars. And those ads were embarrassing and tested their ethical and religious beliefs.

Yesterday, the city's Taxi and Limousine Commission voted unanimously to allow cab drivers who own their cars to veto the ads put on top of their vehicles.

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5:26pm

Fri September 16, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Doctors Call For Pullback On Narcotics For Chronic Pain

In a bracing call to action, three doctors from California are telling their peers to think twice before prescribing potent narcotics for patients with chronic pain.

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