9:10am

Wed July 13, 2011
Opinion

New Republic: McConnell Waves White Flag For GOP

Republicans and Democrats are locked in a debate over the nation's deficit but some believe the GOP is ready to surrender.
iStockphoto.com

Jonathan Chait is a senior editor at The New Republic. He writes the magazine's TRB column. He is also the author of The Big Con: Crackpot Economics and the Fleecing of America. He has worked at The New Republic since 1995.

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9:00am

Wed July 13, 2011
Eastern and Central Kentucky

Last of the ‘Country Correspondents’

Clarice Floyd, a weekly correspondent with The Casey County News since the late 1950s, enjoys a moment in the home that she has shared for 71 years with her husband, Aaron, in the Mt. Olive community of Casey County.
Larry Rowell Casey County News

A once-loved tradition where community news and events appeared weekly in the local newspaper is being kept alive, at least on a part-time basis. Up until about 20 years ago, nearly every small community in Casey County had a resident who collected local news and sent it each week to The Casey County News. Clarice Floyd was one of about 20 correspondents who did this, but as the years progressed, the correspondents faded away. Floyd, a spry and lively 92, is the last correspondent who still periodically gathers the news of her friends and neighbors in the Mt. Olive community. She became a correspondent in the late 1950s.

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8:53am

Wed July 13, 2011
Science/Health

Kids Especially Susceptible to Summer Heat

FRANKFORT – The Kentucky Cabinet for Health and Family Services is urging the public to take steps to avoid injury and illness during this period of extreme heat, particularly dangers associated with leaving children in vehicles. According to Safe Kids, 49 children in the U.S. died last year from heat stroke while unattended in vehicles. From 1998-2010, at least 494 deaths are known to have occurred nationally. In Kentucky, there have been 13 deaths attributed to vehicular hyperthermia during the same time period and one death every year since 2004.

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8:51am

Wed July 13, 2011
Business and the Economy

Officials Downplay Rival Zip Lines

Work started this week on the new zipline at the Black Mountain Off-Road Adventure Area. The $200,000 project represents a major investment for the Harlan County Outdoor Board Authority, and recently the board learned about the opening of a competing zipline in eastern Kentucky. A private developer has opened a zipline attraction at Red River Gorge in Wolfe County, but representatives of the outdoor board downplay the significance of that opening on their project

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8:50am

Wed July 13, 2011
The Two-Way

Yankees Fan's Good Deed Could Prove Taxing

Originally published on Wed July 13, 2011 8:52 am

New York Yankees' Derek Jeter, right, and Christian Lopez at a news conference on Saturday (July 9, 2011) at Yankee Stadium.
Bill Kostroun AP

The feel-good story of last week about the young New York Yankees fan who very willingly gave back the home run ball that shortstop Derek Jeter clobbered to get his 3,000th career hit took a predictable but still somewhat depressing turn yesterday.

The New York Times reported that: "No Good Deed Goes Untaxed (Perhaps)."

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8:41am

Wed July 13, 2011
Eastern and Central Kentucky

New Taxi Regs Would Increase Competition

Lexington resident Carmen Davis has dreams of running a small business. She and a friend have been researching the possibility of opening a taxi cab company. Davis' efforts came to a screeching halt when she saw Fayette County's current taxi requirements. "I believe I started looking at the ordinance in early June and it was kind of overwhelming because to buy 25 vehicles at one time is a huge investment for a small business owner." 

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8:38am

Wed July 13, 2011
Kentucky Arts and Culture

Orchestra's Labor Trouble Continues

Members of the Louisville Orchestra’s musicians union say they will reject the latest contract offer from the Orchestra. The Orchestra proposal, which outlines specific expectations for rehearsal and performance attendance, was delivered last week. It names tomorrow as the deadline for members to respond. If they don’t, the orchestra says it  “will be treated as a voluntary refusal to work and the Louisville Orchestra will take whatever steps are legally appropriate to fill your position.”

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8:35am

Wed July 13, 2011
Sports

Latest NBA Attempt Could Lawyer's Last

As the NBA lockout nears the two week mark, players, managers and owners are no longer in talks about their franchises. For over thirty years, Louisville attorney J. Bruce Miller has been in talks to bring an NBA franchise to the city. But his latest attempt will most likely be his last. Bruce Miller’s law office is a hybrid of two of his fascinations: Greek culture and professional basketball.  Behind his desk sits a model of the Parthenon. Strewn around his office he has basketball jerseys and other basketball paraphernalia.  Miller has white hair and speaks with a slight southern twang. When I spoke to him, he was wearing an NBA lapel pin on his suit.

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8:10am

Wed July 13, 2011
The Two-Way

U.K. Lawmakers Unite To Oppose Murdoch Bid For Broadcaster

There's a lot happening right now in the expanding scandal in the U.K. over allegations that newspapers owned by Rupert Murdoch's News International illegally obtained private information — sometimes by paying police — about thousands of people, from members of the royal family and a former prime minister to victims of the 2005 London bombings and the 9/11 attacks.:

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7:34am

Wed July 13, 2011
Around the Nation

Mistake Found In North Dakota's Constitution

North Dakota became a state in 1889. Now, 122 years later, a flaw has been found in the state's constitution. Historian John Rolcynski noticed it doesn't say the governor has to take an oath of office, as required by Article VI of the U.S. Constitution.

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