4:00am

Mon July 18, 2011
NPR Story

The Last Word In Business

Mary Louise Kelly and Steve Inskeep have the Last Word in business.

Allison Aubrey is a correspondent for NPR News. Aubrey is a 2013 James Beard Foundation Awards nominee for her broadcast radio coverage of food and nutrition. And, along with her colleagues on The Salt, winner of a 2012 James Beard Award for best food blog. Her stories can be heard on Morning Edition and All Things Considered. She's also host of the NPR video series Tiny Desk Kitchen.

Through her reporting Aubrey can focus on her curiosities about food and culture. She has investigated the nutritional, and taste, differences between grass fed and corn feed beef. Aubrey looked into the hype behind the claims of antioxidants in berries and the claim that honey is a cure-all for allergies.

1:00am

Mon July 18, 2011
The End Of The Space Shuttle Era

The Handmade Space Shuttle

Workers paint the shuttle's name onto its wing at the shuttle construction facility in Palmdale, Calif., on March 15, 1985.
Boeing

Many parts of the space shuttles were built and crafted by the hands of skilled workers. Below, see photos from the construction of the space shuttles and hear from some of the people who built and worked on maintaining the space ships.

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12:01am

Mon July 18, 2011
Author Interviews

Education Of An Interrogator: Questioning The CIA

Glenn Carle served for 23 years in the Clandestine Services of the Central Intelligence Agency.
Sally J. Carle

Glenn Carle's bosses asked him if he could go on a trip — one that would last somewhere between 30 and 60 days. His job? To interrogate a man suspected of being a top member of al-Qaida.

It was 2002 and, in the aftermath of the Sept. 11 tragedy, the U.S. was heavily engaged in its "War on Terror." Carle, a former CIA intelligence officer, was "surged" to become an interrogator and sent to one of the Agency's secret overseas facilities. He writes about his experience in his new book, The Interrogator: An Education.

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12:01am

Mon July 18, 2011
Health

Tinnitus: Why Won't My Ears Stop Ringing?

A doctor performs an ear exam.
iStockphoto

Ringing in the ears, or tinnitus, can be so annoying that a person with it can't sleep, think, or work. It's a common problem for veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan. But tinnitus can also start for no apparent reason. That's what happened to Mark Church.

He went to the dentist for a routine visit 11 years ago, and soon after had an annoying buzzing sound in his ears. The doctor said he had tinnitus.

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12:01am

Mon July 18, 2011
Politics

The Politics Behind New Voter ID Laws

A voter casts a ballot in a Democratic primary on July 12, 2011 in Wisconsin, one of seven states to enact voter ID laws this year.
Dinesh Ramde ASSOCIATED PRESS

Voters going to the polls next year — and even some this year — will encounter lots of new rules. Photo ID requirements and fewer options for early voting are among the biggest changes.

They're part of a wave of new laws enacted by Republican-controlled legislatures this year. Supporters say the rules are needed to ensure honest elections.

But Democrats say it's part of a concerted GOP campaign to suppress the vote. They say minorities, students, the poor and disabled — those most likely to vote Democratic — will be hurt the most.

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12:01am

Mon July 18, 2011
The End Of The Space Shuttle Era

Crafting Shuttles: Labor Of Love, Vanishing Art

A worker tests components on a model of the space shuttle before wind tunnel testing.
NASA

As space shuttle Atlantis orbits the Earth on NASA's last shuttle mission, it's worth remembering that key parts of this high-tech spaceship were handmade by people back here on Earth.

Five years ago, NPR profiled a few of the workers who make pieces of NASA's shuttles, using everyday tools like sewing needles and X-ACTO knives. With the shuttle program ending, NPR revisited those people to see how their lives are changing now that the shuttles will no longer need them.

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12:01am

Mon July 18, 2011
National Security

Terrorism Training Casts Pall Over Muslim Employee

In the first of two stories on counterterrorism training, NPR reports on one training session that turned a state employee into a suspect.

The man at the center of this story is a 59-year-old Jordanian-American named Omar al-Omari. He looks very much like the college professor that he is — all tweed jacket, button-down shirt, thick round glasses, drinking coffee. We met at a coffee shop near downtown Columbus, Ohio, where he laid out a series of events that ended with him being accused of having links to terrorism.

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12:01am

Mon July 18, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Rethinking Tinnitus: When The Ringing Won't Stop, Clear Your Mind

Originally published on Wed July 27, 2011 11:45 am

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction teaches simple techniques — such as using slow breathing — to focus your attention.
iStockphoto

Silence is a beautiful thing. But Robert DeMong has accepted that he'll likely never experience it again.

He's got a condition called tinnitus, which means a ringing sound travels with him everywhere he goes, including to bed at night.

It came on suddenly about five years ago. And he says it threw him into depression. "It was like an ugly monster inside my head," recalls DeMong. "I couldn't sleep at night."

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12:01am

Mon July 18, 2011
Economy

AARP Finds Toll On Family Caregivers Is 'Huge'

iStockphoto.com

A new study by the AARP estimates that for the more than 40 million Americans caring for an elderly or disabled loved one, the value of their work is $450 billion a year.

That's a good deal for society. But for the family members doing the work, the study finds they need a lot more help.

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