12:01am

Mon July 18, 2011
Shots - Health Blog

Rethinking Tinnitus: When The Ringing Won't Stop, Clear Your Mind

Originally published on Wed July 27, 2011 11:45 am

Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction teaches simple techniques — such as using slow breathing — to focus your attention.
iStockphoto

Silence is a beautiful thing. But Robert DeMong has accepted that he'll likely never experience it again.

He's got a condition called tinnitus, which means a ringing sound travels with him everywhere he goes, including to bed at night.

It came on suddenly about five years ago. And he says it threw him into depression. "It was like an ugly monster inside my head," recalls DeMong. "I couldn't sleep at night."

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12:01am

Mon July 18, 2011
Economy

AARP Finds Toll On Family Caregivers Is 'Huge'

iStockphoto.com

A new study by the AARP estimates that for the more than 40 million Americans caring for an elderly or disabled loved one, the value of their work is $450 billion a year.

That's a good deal for society. But for the family members doing the work, the study finds they need a lot more help.

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6:59pm

Sun July 17, 2011
The Two-Way

U.S. Women Lose To Japan, In A Title Game Of Many Chances

Members of the U.S. women's national team look on after losing the FIFA Women's World Cup Final against Japan. The Americans lost on penalty kicks after overtime expired with the teams tied, 2-2.
Joern Pollex Getty Images

The FIFA Women's World Cup final between the U.S. and Japan had a familiar feel to it, as the American squad once again found themselves being pushed to the brink. But the confidence, skill and resourcefulness that propelled them past Brazil and France weren't quite enough Sunday, and the U.S. women lost despite never trailing Japan in 120 minutes of play on the field.

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4:59pm

Sun July 17, 2011
Religion

How Bible Stories Evolved Over The Centuries

A scholar at the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary examines early Greek manuscripts of the New Testament.
Bill Warren Center for New Testament Textual Studies

Many Christians believe that the words of the New Testament are set in stone. But scholars at the New Orleans Baptist Theological Seminary are chronicling just how much those words have evolved over time.

For 11 years, they've combed through the earliest Greek manuscripts of each book in the New Testament and found more than 17,000 pages of variations. Their ultimate goal: the world's first comprehensive, searchable online database showing how the New Testament has changed.

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3:00pm

Sun July 17, 2011
Europe

Murdoch Aide Arrested In Hacking Scandal

The former editor of Rupert Murdoch's tabloid "News of the World" was arrested Sunday in connection with the phone hacking scandal. Also Sunday, London's top police official resigned over the scandal. Andy McSmith, a senior writer at Britain's Independent newspaper, offers his insight.

3:00pm

Sun July 17, 2011
Sports

Japan Defeats U.S. In Women's World Cup Final

Japan became the first Asian nation to win the Women's World Cup on Sunday, beating the United States in a penalty shootout after both sides were level at 2-2 after extra time. The Japanese denied the U.S. team the chance to become the first nation to lift the cup three times.

3:00pm

Sun July 17, 2011
History

Through The Static, The Voice Of History

This battered tin cylinder record was found in the 1960s in a desk belonging to Thomas Edison's secretary. But no one could play it until recently.
National Park Service

The voice on the little antique cylinder record is tinny, scratchy, barely audible through storms of static. But if you listen closely, you can just hear a young woman reciting a nursery rhyme: "Twinkle, twinkle, little star."

This is the oldest known commercial recording. Made by Thomas Edison late in 1888, it's a prototype for a line of talking dolls Edison hoped to bring to market. But no one had been able to play the little cylinder in decades.

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2:56pm

Sun July 17, 2011
Politics

GOP's Return To The Right Goes Too Far For Some

Twenty-four. That's the number of bills President Obama has signed into law since the swearing in of the 122th Congress this January. That's about a quarter of the amount that the president signed during the same period last year.

Certainly, productivity slips when Congress is split, but the trickle of bills passed this year suggests a new kind of logjam.

What may make this period more challenging — and not just for Obama, but even for some congressional Republicans — is a group within the party that sees compromise as a four-letter word.

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2:54pm

Sun July 17, 2011
The Two-Way

U.S. Women Face Japan In World Cup Title Match

Players of the USA (R) and Japan stand in a line prior to the FIFA Women's Football World Cup final match of Japan vs USA on July 17, 2011 in Frankfurt/M., western Germany.
John MacDougall AFP/Getty Images

The U.S. women's national team tries to take its first World Cup title since 1999 Sunday, facing a Japanese team that has become a sentimental favorite in Germany, the host nation.

We'll be updating this post with highlights from the game. You can watch also follow the live action at ESPN3.com.

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2:52pm

Sun July 17, 2011
Business and the Economy

Tourism Gains Down the Track

New railroad ties await installation in downtown Midway
Stu Johnson Weku

Repairs to a railroad which cuts through the heart of a scenic central Kentucky town is sure to cause some disruption.   But, it’s the view ‘down the track’ which excites business owners who cater to tourists. Railroad crossing repairs along four streets in Midway is expected to snarl traffic over the next couple of weeks.  Each crossing will be impassible for a couple days while it’s upgraded.  It’s inconvenient, but Mary Thoresen of Damselfly Gallery says it’s important to look at the big picture.

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