11:02am

Mon August 1, 2011
All Politics are Local

Paper Slaps Beshear over "Snubgate"

The Louisville Courier-Journal concurred with Republican gubernatorial candidate David Williams in a weekend editorial, chastising Democratic Governor Steve Beshear for pretending to snub President Barack Obama during his recent visit to Kentucky.

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11:00am

Mon August 1, 2011
Eastern and Central Kentucky

Optimism over Berea's Fairness Ordinance

The Berea, Kentucky City Council will meet tomorrow. No discussion of two pending anti-discrimination laws is on the agenda, but gay rights activists say the panel is moving closer to passing measures protecting LGBT residents. The Louisville Fairness Campaign has been instrumental in supporting an ordinance that would make it illegal to discriminate on the basis of sexual orientation or gender identity in Berea. Last month, a proposal for a city Human Rights Commission was introduced but it did not include any language saying the commission would investigate discrimination against LGBT residents.

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10:57am

Mon August 1, 2011
Business and the Economy

Developers Cancel Museum Plaza

The proposed Museum Plaza project in downtown Louisville has been canceled. The tower at 6th and Main streets would’ve been the tallest building in Kentucky. It was put on hold three years ago when the developers could not find a suitable bond deal to finance the project. Hope for the $490 million project was renewed last yearwhen city and state officials announced their intention to seek a $100 million loan from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development. The loan required the developers to find matching funds in the private sector, which they could not.

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10:53am

Mon August 1, 2011
The Two-Way

Manufacturing Hits Lowest Level In 2 Years

The markets reacted positively to the debt ceiling deal this morning, but bad news on the manufacturing level sent them lower.

The Institute for Supply Management announced that manufacturing activity barely grew in July. The AP reports:

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10:52am

Mon August 1, 2011
Eastern and Central Kentucky

Worries Over Rural Post Offices

The post office in Wildie might be one of those targeted for closing by the U.S. Postal Service. More than 130 statewide might be shuttered, but not all under review will be closed.
Hannah Potes Lexington Herald-Leader

For shrinking rural communities in Kentucky, it's usually the local businesses that close first. Then the schools consolidate. And now, it seems, the local post offices in some of Kentucky's tiniest towns might be closing their doors. That's the plan, anyway, as the U.S. Postal Service considers shutting down 130 post offices across the state.

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10:49am

Mon August 1, 2011
Science/Health

Radon: Ignorance Kills

Alan New and Joey Weller of Sapper6 Inc. drill a hole for a radon mitigation system in a home in the Fox Fire subdivision in Elizabethtown.
Gina Clear The News-Enterprise

As the adage goes, “What we don’t know can’t hurt us.” According to local, state and national authorities on radon, lack of knowledge on the subject could, in fact, be killing us. “It’s astonishing, frankly,” said Professional Learning Institute Dean Steve Keeney, “but there’s nobody out there explaining the risk to the public.” According to the Environmental Protection Agency, exposure to radon in homes is responsible for an estimated 20,000 lung cancer deaths each year, second only to lung cancer caused by smoking. More people die from radon-related lung cancer each year than from gunshots.

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10:45am

Mon August 1, 2011
Eastern and Central Kentucky

Nicholas Sheriff on Trial

Nicholas County Sheriff Leonard Garrett.
Lexington Herald-Leader

In a trial that is likely to be watched closely by local residents, Nicholas County Sheriff Leonard "Dick" Garrett is scheduled to be tried this week on felony charges of theft and abuse of public trust. If convicted of the latter charge, Garrett, 48, could forfeit office and go to prison for five to 10 years. He is free on bond but has remained sheriff since he was indicted in October.

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10:39am

Mon August 1, 2011
Politics

Congress To Move Quickly On Debt, Spending Deal

Vice President Biden walks through the Senate Subway on his way to meetings at the U.S. Capitol on Monday.
Mark Wilson Getty Images

House and Senate leaders prepared for possible votes Monday on the tentative deal to raise the government's debt ceiling and prevent a U.S. default.

Both Senate Majority Leader Harry Reid (D-NV) and the office of House Majority Leader Eric Cantor (R-VA) said the votes could come as early as Monday evening, depending on the outcome of meetings with members. Cantor's office said the House would go first.

The agreement gained momentum in the Senate on Monday after months of partisan rancor.

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10:37am

Mon August 1, 2011
Kentucky Arts and Culture

Drive-ins Find New Popularity

On July 15, opening night of Harry Potter and the Deathly Hallows, Part 2, moviegoers arrived early at Winchester's Sky-Vue Twin Drive-In. First-run movies are the norm now at drive-ins.
Mark Cornelison Lexington Herald-Leader

While 3-D technology increasingly becomes the norm in mainstream films, theaters boast the latest and loudest speakers, and moviegoing has become a predominantly indoor pastime, some people still seem to prefer the simplicity of the past: the drive-in. It's a past that dates back almost 80 years, and it allows people to be essentially in their own private movie theaters, free to create their own experience. That nostalgia and experience are what have kept people coming back to drive-in theaters, even when there was a time it looked as if they could die out, fans say. "People don't go to the drive-in or a normal theater for just the movie. It's the experience," said Chris Erwin, manager of Judy Drive-In in Mount Sterling. "The drive-in experience is one that can't be duplicated no matter what's on screen. Its charm is that it's simple."

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10:37am

Mon August 1, 2011
The Two-Way

FBI Says It Has 'A New Suspect' In D.B. Cooper Skyjacking

Originally published on Tue August 2, 2011 12:41 pm

A 1971 artist's sketch released by the FBI shows the skyjacker known as 'Dan Cooper' and 'D.B. Cooper'. The sketch was made from the recollections of passengers and crew of a Northwest Orient Airlines jet he hijacked between Portland and Seattle.
Anonymous AP

Forty years after parachuting into folklore, the mysterious skyjacker identified as D.B. Cooper may soon be identified.

"We do actually have a new suspect we're looking at," says FBI spokeswoman Ayn Sandolo Dietrich in a story in the British newspaper, The Telegraph. "And it comes from a credible lead who came to our attention recently via a law enforcement colleague."

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