6:20am

Sat July 30, 2011
Technology

What Will We Watch As Drones Evolve?

Every week it seems there are reports about U.S. drones — unmanned, remote-controlled aerial vehicles — tracking down suspected terrorists in remote, unreachable areas of Yemen, Somalia, Libya or Pakistan. Drone technology is becoming increasingly affordable and accessible, with new potential for everyday use in the United States — and new worries for national security.

Uses At Home

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6:20am

Sat July 30, 2011
America's Mayors: Governing In Tough Times

In Tough Times, Philadelphia Bucks The Trend

Part 3 of a 6-part series

More than two years after the recession officially ended, mayors across the country are still struggling to balance their budgets.

Philadelphia avoided the big public employee layoffs seen in other cities by bucking national trends and doing what many consider unthinkable: raising taxes.

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6:57pm

Fri July 29, 2011
Economy

House Poised To Vote On Debt Bill

Robert Siegel talks to NPR's David Welna live on Capitol Hill. Welna discusses what's happening with Speaker John Boehner's debt ceiling plan in the House.

6:55pm

Fri July 29, 2011
Economy

House Passes Debt Bill

The House passed Republican Speaker John Boehner's debt ceiling bill. Robert Siegel talks to NPR's Ron Elving for more.

6:30pm

Fri July 29, 2011
It's All Politics

Waiting Is Hardest Part: What To Look For From Congress Next

Waiting. Then more waiting. That's what Congress has in store for us this weekend, even as people across the country look to Washington for a solution on the debt ceiling deadlock.

Now that the House has done its work by passing Speaker John Boehner's (R-OH) plan — and Senate Democratic leaders plan to table the bill, effectively killing it — we take a look at likely next steps.

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5:00pm

Fri July 29, 2011
World

Debt Lessons From Around The World

Thousands demonstrate outside the Spanish parliament in Madrid last month in a protest against rampant unemployment and biting austerity measures.
Pedro Armestre AFP/Getty Images

As members of Congress spar over whether to raise the U.S. debt ceiling, they might consider the efforts of other governments to manage their own debt problems. Some have been successful — some not — but all their experiences are instructive, with lessons for Washington.

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4:01pm

Fri July 29, 2011
Economy

System Makes It Hard To Prioritize U.S. Bill Payments

It's not yet clear if the U.S. Treasury has the ability to pick and chose who gets paid and who gets stiffed if it the $14.3 trillion debt ceiling isn't raised and it runs out of credit.

The government doesn't have flexibility like the average household might, says Jay Powell, a former Treasury undersecretary under President George H.W. Bush and a fellow at the Bipartisan Policy Center.

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3:47pm

Fri July 29, 2011
The Two-Way

Judge Orders Nixon's Grand Jury Testimony Unsealed

A federal judge sided with a historian, today, ordering that secret grand jury testimony by Richard Nixon be released publicly. Nixon testified before a grand jury, after he resigned and after he was pardoned by President Gerald Ford.

Reuters reports:

U.S. District Judge Royce Lamberth granted a request by historian Stanley Kutler, who has written several books about Nixon and Watergate, and others to unseal the testimony given on June 23 and 24 in 1975.

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3:25pm

Fri July 29, 2011
Spotlight on Country

Ashton Shepherd: Country Music With Roots

Ashton Shepherd, whose new album is called Where Country Grows.
Danny Clinch Courtesy of MCA Nashville

In these days of downright citified, even glamorous, country music singers, Ashton Shepherd lives the life other country stars just sing about. Her new album, Where Country Grows, is her second, but Shepherd hasn't moved to a big spread outside Nashville. She still lives in Coffeeville, Ala. She sells vegetables out of the back of her pickup truck when she's not on tour.

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3:16pm

Fri July 29, 2011
Culture And Traditions

At 7 Days, Egyptian Babies Mark First Rite Of Passage

Originally published on Wed May 23, 2012 11:36 am

Israa Saad Diab lifts the cover from her son Hamza's face, while her husband, Ibrahim Muhammad, watches, after the traditional Sebou ceremony in Mansoura, Egypt, on May 27.
Holly Pickett for NPR

In Egypt, survival and the number 7 are inextricably linked. It's on the seventh day that a child's existence is first formally acknowledged to the world in a ritual that dates back to Pharaonic times.

But the ancient tradition — called the Sebou — has taken on new and not always happy turns since a revolution earlier this year ousted longtime President Hosni Mubarak.

Building An Infant's Character

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