4:16pm

Mon August 1, 2011
Science And Medicine

Stigma Hinders Treatment For Postpartum Depression

Dorothy Mwesiga with her third child. Mwesiga was treated with antidepressant drugs and talk therapy for her postpartum depression.
Joanne Silberner for NPR

When Heidi Koss picks up her daughter Bronwen from middle school in a Seattle suburb, it's completely routine: They chat about kickball and whether Bronwen ate the muffin her mother packed for breakfast.

But 10 years ago when Bronwen was born, things were anything but ordinary, says Koss.

"I felt nothing toward my baby," says Koss. "One day I woke up and I didn't care about her."

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4:03pm

Mon August 1, 2011
Economy

Despite Deal, Credit Downgrade Still A Possibility

Congress' tentative deal to raise the nation's debt ceiling calls for more than $2 trillion in spending cuts, far short of the $4 trillion in deficit reductions proposed earlier in the process.

And that keeps the doors open to a potential downgrade in the country's credit rating. Of the three major ratings agencies, Standard & Poor's toed the hardest line on a possible downgrade to U.S. debt.

Last month, S&P said there was a 50 percent chance the U.S. could lose its top AAA rating if Congress failed to come up with a "credible agreement to reduce the debt."

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4:01pm

Mon August 1, 2011
Eastern and Central Kentucky

Three Kentucky Mines Cited by Feds in June

The federal Mine Safety and Health Administration has cited three Kentucky mines for safety violations. They were among 14 nationwide with a history of compliance problems targeted in MSHA’s special impact inspections. The mines cited were the Cheyenne Mining Company’s Number 11 mine in Pike County, D&C Mining Corporation’s mine in Harlan County and North Fork Coal Corporation’s Mine Number 4 in Letcher County. Together they received a total of 45 orders and citations.MSHA began the special impact inspections after the explosion last year at the Upper Big Branch Mine in West Virginia killed twenty-nine miners. Since then, the agency says it’s conducted nearly 300 impact inspections, which have resulted in more than 5,000 citations.

3:59pm

Mon August 1, 2011
America's Mayors: Governing In Tough Times

Redondo Beach: Unusual Leadership Dodges Red Ink

While much of California is struggling financially, the city of Redondo Beach has managed to stay out of the red.
The City of Redondo Beach

Part 4 of a 6-part series

The wall in the hallway outside the Redondo Beach Mayor's Office kind of says it all: There is row after row of smiling faces. Almost all male. All pale. Some blond, some gray. All very indicative of what many Americans still think of when you say "California beach city," until the last photo in the last row.

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3:42pm

Mon August 1, 2011
The Two-Way

S.C. Loses Civil Rights Legend Judge Matthew Perry

In 2004, the federal courthouse where U.S. District Judge Matthew Perry worked was named after him. Here, Perry speaks at the dedication ceremony.
Lou Krasky AP

The state of South Carolina has lost a leading light of its Civil Rights transformation, as U.S. District Judge Matthew J. Perry died this past weekend. Perry, who spurred social and educational integration, would have celebrated his 90th birthday this week.

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2:46pm

Mon August 1, 2011
Asia

China Aims To Renew Status As Scientific Superpower

Originally published on Wed August 3, 2011 5:32 pm

A researcher works at the Wuhan National Laboratory for Optoelectronics in central China's Hubei province on June 9. Beijing's spending on research and development has increased over the past few years in an effort to re-establish the country's scientific prowess.
AFP/Getty Images

First in a three-part series

China was probably the world's earliest technological superpower, inventing the plow, the compass, gunpowder and block printing. Then, science in the Middle Kingdom languished for centuries.

Until 1893, the Chinese didn't even have a word for "science." That was when a Japanese term originally made its way into the Chinese language, a symbol of just how much of a latecomer China was to modern science.

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2:33pm

Mon August 1, 2011
The Two-Way

Dawn Spacecraft Begins Exploring Asteroid Belt

NASA's Dawn spacecraft obtained this image of the giant asteroid Vesta with its framing camera on July 24, 2011. It was taken from a distance of about 3,200 miles.
NASA

NASA's Dawn spacecraft has started beaming back pictures of the second largest body in the Asteroid belt that's between Mars and Jupiter. The images are the first of the asteroid Vesta, which is about the size of Colorado, and they are stunning:

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1:53pm

Mon August 1, 2011
All Politics are Local

State Whistleblower Alleges Intimidation

A veteran state employee has alleged in a letter delivered to Kentucky Attorney General Jack Conway’s office Monday that some government workers were threatened with termination if they did not contribute to Democratic Governor Steve Beshear’s re-election campaign.

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1:51pm

Mon August 1, 2011
The Two-Way

Colleges For Partying, Eating, And Learning (If You Must)

Originally published on Mon August 1, 2011 2:16 pm

College students aid a colleague as he performs a keg stand in this file photo. Princeton Review released its new list of top party schools in America Monday.
Joe Raedle Getty Images

For the second year in a row, two universities in towns named Athens are at the top of the Party Schools rankings put out by the Princeton Review. But this year, Ohio University topped the University of Georgia for the No. 1 spot.

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