2:06pm

Wed August 3, 2011
The Two-Way

Chinese City Bans Dogs, Telling Owners To Turn Them In

A sign reading "No Entry For Dogs" is posted near the Confucius Temple in a file photo from Nanjing, China. The city sought to remove stray dogs in 2007, prompted by fears of rabies.
China Photos Getty Images

Officials in Jiangmen, China, are banning residents from keeping dogs, in a move that will take effect at the end of August, according to Chinese media. In one week, owners can begin taking their dogs to drop-off centers, where they will be either adopted by residents of rural areas or euthanized.

The ban targets dogs in densely populated sections of Jiangmen, a city with a population of 3.8 million. Any owners who wish to keep their dogs must apply for a license, reports China Daily.

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2:05pm

Wed August 3, 2011
Asia

Plagiarism Plague Hinders China's Scientific Ambition

Helen Zhang's University of Zhejiang scientific journal was the first in China to use CrossCheck text analysis software to scan for plagiarism. She discovered that over a two year period, 31 percent of all papers showed unreasonable copying or plagiarism. The results are a symbol of the country's uphill battle to become a global leader in innovative scientific thought.
Louisa Lim NPR

Last in a three-part series

For a decade, Helen Zhang has had a dream: to run an international scientific journal that meets international standards. So she was delighted to be appointed journal director for Zhejiang University in the eastern Chinese city of Hangzhou.

In 2008, when her scientific publication, the Journal of Zhejiang University-Science, became the first in China to use CrossCheck text analysis software to spot plagiarism, Zhang was pleased to be a trailblazer. But when the first set of results came in, she was upset and horrified.

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2:00pm

Wed August 3, 2011
History

The Long, Hot Road To Modern Air Conditioning

A nurse adjusts the air conditioning for the comfort of the patient in a hospital room during the 1950s. By 1953, over 1 million air conditioning units had been sold in the U.S.
Three Lions Getty Images

For some inventions, say the light bulb, everyone knows who invented it.

But at the U.S. Capitol on a hot July day, no one seemed to know who invented the air conditioner. Even as the statue of a man many call the air conditioner's inventor stood just down the hall.

After an hour or so of searching, Mike Veselik, from Chicago, came close to knowing.

"I know that a doctor from Florida came up with it, trying to stop people from having fevers I think it was," Veselik said.

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1:56pm

Wed August 3, 2011
The Two-Way

Justice Department Charges 72 In Connection With Major Child Porn Ring

The Justice Department announced today that it had made 52 people and charged 72 in connection with an international child pornography ring with members in countries from the United States to Serbia.

U.S. Attorney General Eric Holder said the operation was the largest of its kind and took almost two years to complete.

NPR's Carrie Johnson reports:

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1:35pm

Wed August 3, 2011
The Commonwealth

Corbin City Manager Pays Tax Debts

A week ago, Corbin City Manager Bill Ed Cannon owed over $4,500 in unpaid property taxes to Knox County, but officials confirmed Tuesday that all of that debt, some of it a decade old, has now been paid in full. The move came after the publication of an investigative report in the News Journal July 27 that revealed Cannon owed roughly $4,561 in back taxes on three separate properties in Knox County.

1:32pm

Wed August 3, 2011
The Commonwealth

Bowling Green Temporarily Bans Fireworks

In a rare 11th-hour move, the Bowling Green Board of Commissioners voted 5-0 on the first reading of an ordinance to temporarily ban fireworks for the next three months, through Oct. 31. The move follows numerous citizen complaints about July 4 fireworks.

1:32pm

Wed August 3, 2011
Space

Early Earth May Have Been Orbited By Two Moons

This artist's illustration shows a collision between the moon and a companion moon. Scientists say the collision could be responsible for the moon's asymmetric shape.
Martin Jutzi and Erik Asphaug Nature

The early Earth had two moons instead of just one — our familiar moon, as well as a smaller companion moon that also rose and set in the sky for tens of millions of years.

That's according to a new theory that says this smaller moon eventually went careening into our moon and is still there, in the form of mountains on its far side.

Scientists have long puzzled over those mountains, and the fact that the two sides of our moon are very different. The near side has flat lowlands, while the far side is high and mountainous.

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1:28pm

Wed August 3, 2011
Kentucky Arts and Culture

WWII Aircraft Fly Into Lexington Friday

Three World War II-era military planes will be flying into Lexington this Friday, giving the public a glimpse at two rare bombers and a Mustang fighter plane.  It's one thing to see WWII planes locked away at a museum; it's another to crawl inside them.

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1:24pm

Wed August 3, 2011
National Security

White House Unveils Counter-Extremism Plan

Originally published on Thu August 4, 2011 11:56 am

The White House unveiled its strategy to counter radicalization today, ending months of speculation about how President Obama intends to tackle the problem of violent extremism in this country.

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1:19pm

Wed August 3, 2011
It's All Politics

Obama, Democrats 'Pivot' To Jobs But May Be Hamstrung

What Washington was worried about and what many Americans have been haunted by has seemed out of synch in recent weeks.

The fiery Washington debate was about the debt-ceiling, while the concerns of millions of Americans was about jobs, either finding or keeping one.

For Washington Democrats, the debt ceiling debate was a distraction from the jobs message they view as key to their re-election efforts.

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