4:00am

Wed June 1, 2011
Europe

Mladic Tried To Show He Was 'Tough Military Guy'

Former Bosnian Serb military commander Ratko Mladic is in the Hague to face war crimes charges. He was captured last week and a Serbian court rejected an appeal to delay his transfer. For some insight on Mladic, Mary Louie Kelly talks to veteran U.S. diplomat Christopher Hill.

4:00am

Wed June 1, 2011
Law

Del. Trial Begins Soon For Ex-Pediatrician

Jury selection has been postponed until next week in Delaware for the criminal trial of Earl Bradley. The former pediatrician is accused of sexually assaulting more than 100 children he treated over a 10-year period. That's left parents and others in the small town of Lewes wondering why it took authorities so long to intervene.

4:00am

Wed June 1, 2011
Middle East

Bahrain Prepares To Lift State Of Emergency

The government of Bahrain today is expected to lift a state of emergency that was declared at the height of the anti-government protests in March. Mary Louise Kelly talks to NPR's Kelly McEvers about the situation in Bahrain.

4:00am

Wed June 1, 2011
Asia

Another Pakistani Journalist Is Killed In Pakistan

Morning Edition's Steve Inskeep reports from Pakistan on the death of another prominent Pakistani journalist. Saleem Shazhad, who had been critical of the government, had been tortured. Inskeep also talks to Pakistani journalist Najam Sethi about attitudes in Pakistan now that Osama bin Laden is dead.

4:00am

Wed June 1, 2011
Asia

After Crises Japanese Lose Faith In Their Government

In Japan, public distrust of the government is growing following the earthquake, tsunami and nuclear crisis. The country's prime minister is expected to face a vote of no confidence tomorrow.

4:00am

Wed June 1, 2011
Afghanistan

Why Regional Neighbors Should Help Stabilize Afghanistan

Osama bin Laden's death has put more pressure on the United States' strategic partnership with Pakistan, and its ongoing commitment to the war in Afghanistan. Thomas Barnett, chief analyst of Wikistrat, an online community for global strategists, tells Renee Montagne that the U.S. relationships with Pakistan and Afghanistan aren't worth the effort.

2:09am

Wed June 1, 2011
Education

Spelling Bee Pregame: Why Are Some Words So Hard?

When Words Go Wild: Nathan J. Marcisz of Marion, Ind., thinks about an answer during last year's Scripps National Spelling Bee. Contestants often stumble over foreignisms that have silent vowels or odd roots, says Ben Zimmer.
Alex Wong Getty Images

The Scripps National Spelling Bee is under way outside Washington, D.C., and over the next few days, 275 kids from ages 8 to 15 will put their spelling skills to the test.

"These kids are spending sometimes a few hours a day going through word lists" to learn the most difficult words in English, linguist Ben Zimmer tells NPR's Renee Montagne. "Very often, they are coming from immigrant families that really prize learning English as part of becoming assimilated into American culture. So, my hat's off to all of these young spellers."

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12:01am

Wed June 1, 2011
Business

Yacht Maker Now Navigating Wind Power Industry

Engineers and workers at Tiara Yachts have found similarities between building boats and making wind turbines like this one.
Pedro Armestre AFP/Getty Images

The recession forced many small manufacturers to adapt to survive, especially in the industrial Midwest. In Michigan, a yacht-building company started a new venture in the wind-energy industry to keep its factory open.

In 2005 and 2006, Tiara Yachts was operating at full capacity, turning out about 400 yachts per year, with most of them going for around $1 million each. To keep up with demand, the company nearly doubled its manufacturing space in Holland, Mich.

A Fateful Decision To Expand

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12:01am

Wed June 1, 2011
Latin America

El Salvador Fears Ties Between Cartels, Street Gangs

Originally published on Thu June 2, 2011 9:52 am

Barrio La Victoria Ciudad Delgado in San Salvador, El Salvador, is controlled by the Mara Salvatrucha gang. A gang leader says he sees the group as a social organization — one that provides services, like water, and protects "civilians."
Jason Beaubien NPR

Last of a three-part series. Read Part 1 and Part 2.

The drug war in Mexico is having ramifications throughout the hemisphere, as Mexican cartels seek new markets and smuggling routes for their products.

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